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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

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No. 34,651 


Paris, Wednesday, July 27, 1994 


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U.S. Planes 
Reach Zaire 
With Aid for 
Cholera Fight 

Purification ofWater ; 
Gets Highest Priority, 
Death Toll Now ffifiOQ 

By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

With no sign of a letup in the cholera 
epidemic among more than. 1 nriffion 
Rwandan refugees in Zaire, U.S. aircraft 
shipped water purification, units into the 
area on Tuesday, giving aid workers their 
first effective tool in fighting the highly 
infectious disease. 

Along with the purification plants and 
‘dther heavy equipment, the transport 
planes brought in two fire trucks to pump 
water from Lake Kivu to the plants. - 

The biggest purification plant is capable 
of treating 24,000 gallons (91,000 liters) ail 
hour, and will provide the first clean water 
since 1.2 milli on refugees began moving 
across the border to the eastern Zaire town 
of Goma nearly two weeks ago. - 

More U.S. planes, were scheduled to ar- 
rive late Tuesday as part of an operation 
that officials said could involve up to 2,000 
U.S. troops in Rwanda and eastern Zaire.. 

Until now, the refugees have been 
scooping polluted water from Lake.Kivu, 
leading to a cholera epidemic that is killing 
thousands every day. Aid workers said that 
clean water was the highest priority in 
checking both cholera and dysentery, 
which are raging .through encampments 
that lack any kind of sanitation. 

Aid workers estimated that 20,000 peo- 
ple have died of cholera, dysentery, malar- 
ia, starvation and other causes in the past 
week. 

Although desperately needed by aid 
workers, the U.S. water plants will not be 
able to handle the total water require- 
ments, estimated at five liters a person a 
day. 

Using explosives, French troops Masted 
six mass graves in hard volcanic rock to 
bury thousands of bodies have piled 
up along the roadsides and in the squalid • 
1 Refugee encampments. 

David Rawson, the US. ambassador to > 
-iUa&ub, asked the new goyanment in. 
Kigali, the capital, to authorize the sending . 
of U.S. troops and eqmpmentlo the coun- 
try to hdp refugees return to their homes. 

“Our only objective is to get hdp to the 
suffering people as quick as possible and 
by any means,” Mr. Rawson was quoted as 
saying by The Associated Press. 

President Bill Clinton ordered the mili- 
tary buildup last weekend as part of the 
international response to the worst refugee 
crisis in memory. Brigadier General Jack 
Nix flew to eastern Zaire on Tuesday to 
spearhead the U.S. operation^ 

U.S. and French troops succeeded in 

See RWANDA, Page 6 


Berlusconi’s Grasp Grows Shakier 


By Alan Friedman 

■' International Herald Tribtate 

The admission . by a senior executive of 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s Finin- 
vest business empire that he bribed tax 
inspectors, followed by accusations that 
Mr. Berlusconi cannot distinguish .be-, 
tween his ides as company owner and 
government head, have left ItalyVH- 
week-old coalition looking distinctly' 
shaky. _ 

- Although, the prime minister’s loyal- ‘ 
is is insisted on Tuesday that the confli ct- 
of-interest issue would soon go away, 
Mr. Berlusconi’s credibility appears to 
have been seriously damaged by his sec- 
ond political crisis in less than 'a. week. 


What is most striking is that Mr. Ber- 
lusconi — who upon taking office 
pledged to create a wind trust and keep 


pledged to create a blind trust and keep 
his $7 billion-a-year Fininvest business 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

empire separate from politics — may 
lave no one to Marne but himself. 

In a humfliatmg about-face last week, 
the prime minister hastily withdrew a 
controversial emergency-decree law that 
would have sharply curtailed the powers 
of the prosecutors leading Italy’s 30- 
month anti-corruption probe. 

At the time, Mr. Berlusconi bristled at 
suggestions that he had pushed the law in 


order to protect against the possible ar- 
rest of ms brother, Paolo, who is under 
investigation, or of senior executives of 
Fininvest who are accused of paying 
bribes to the Guardja di Finanza, Italy's 
financial police. 

But the move, which was condemned 
by the anti-corruption magistrates in Mi- 
lan, galvanized public opinion against 
Mr. Berlusconi and brought harsh criti- 
cism from both of his coalition partners, 
the neofascist National Alliance and the 
Northern t 

Then, on Sunday night, 24 hours after 
the magistrates ordered the arrest of two 

See ITALY, Page 7 







• • IU 1 ** Ccvoih*' Reusers 

ISRAELI EMBASSY HIT ■ — A car bomb in London nearly obliterated the vehicle, damaged the Israeli Embassy 
and mtmded 13 people Tuesday. In Argentina, a man was detained in last week’s attack at a Jewish center. Page 2. 

Bosnian Serbs to Reimpose Sarajevo Siege 


... . • By John Pomfret - 

’ Washinptm Past Service 

SARAJEVO^ "Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
The . Bosnian Serbs said Tuesday they 
would shut Sarajevo’s only roads to the 
outride world in a defiant gesture toward 
.the international community that will ef- 
fectively rrimpose a siege. • 

In a letter to the United Nations com- 
mand in Sarajevo, Radovan Karadzic, the 



leader of the Bosnian Serbs, said be was 
ordering his forces to shut the three links 
Wednesday for the foreseeable future be- 
cause, he claimed. Bosnia's mostly Muslim 
government was using the arteries to 
snuggle weapons into the city. 

UN officials denied Tuesday that the 
Muslims were sneaking in guns. 

Mr. Karadzic's move is the bluntest and 
most aggressive yet in a series of maneu- 
vers designed to show both the interna- 
tional community and the Bosnian govern- 1 
ment that there is little they can do to alter 
the course of Bosnia's war without the 
express permission of the Bosnian Serbs. 

last week, UN officials charged that 
Serbian gunners fired than 20 bullets into a 
UN plane, in effect shutting Sarajevo's 
airport and grounding the airlift that kept 
this city alive for almost two years. Over 
the weekend, Serbian forces twice used 
heavy weapons around the Muslim enclave 
of Gorazde in violation of a NATO ultima- 
tum threatening air strikes. 

In shutting down roads that have been 
open since late March, the Serbian ploy is 
tuned for maximum effect On Saturday, 


Joint Pledge of Peace 
But Goals That Differ 

Recognizing Rabin Appears 
An Inevitable With Hussein 
Reconciliation In Congress 


foreign ministers from the United States, 
Russia, Germany, Britain and France are 
scheduled to meet to decide how to react to 
the Serbs’ rejection of a peace plan those 
nations drew up. According to that plan, 
the Serbs, who hold 72 percent of Bosnia, 
would have to surrender about one-third 
of their holdings to a federation of Mus- 
lims and Croats, who possess the remain- 
der. 

Under terms of the peace proposal, the 
international community has said it would 
consider increasing pressure agains t the 
Serbs if they reject the proposal. New pres- 
sure might come by tightening economic 
sanctions against Serbia, the mentor of the 
Bosnian Serbs, by belter protecting Mus- 
lim enclaves in eastern Bosnia or finally by 
lifting an international arms embargo 
against Bosnia’s Muslims. 

As such, UN officials said, the Serbs’ 
belligerent behavior is crafted to show that 
pressure is a two-way street and that there 
is not much the international community 
can do to significantly bend their will. 

See BOSNIA, Page 7 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — There is a saying in 
the Talmud that the Messiah will come 
when he is no longer needed. Peace be- 
tween Jordan and Israel is coming because 
it already exists. 

King Hussein of Jordan and Prime Min- 
ister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel did not need 
much coaxing to sign a declaration Mon- 
day ending the state of war between their 
countries. They based (heir diplomatic 
breakthrough on a recognition of their 
mutual setf-interest and the comfort that 
what they were doing was endorsed by 
their people. 

The ceremony at the White House was 
different from the high-anxiety encounter 
last September between Mr. Rabin and 
Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian leader. That 
was a forced marriage between two life- 
long foes who had beat wishing each other 
dead for years. 

By contrast, the event Monday was 
more like a sedate engagement between 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

longtime neighbors who knew they had a 
lot m common, had secretly cooperated for 
years and now, in this new era in the 
Middle East, could finally allow their rela- 
tionship to flourish in the light of day. 

Israel and Jordan have more or less 
coexisted in a cold peace since the 1967 
war, when the Israelis captured the Sinai 
Peninsula from Egypt, the Golan Heights 
from Syria and the West Bank and East 
Jerusalem from Jordan. King Hussein con- 
cluded that the war had been a disaster for 
the Arab world, and in 1973, when Syria 
and Egypt moved against Israel, he sent a 
symbolic army divirion out of Arab soli- 
darity. but mud) too late to make a differ- 
ence. 

The euphoria on Monday was palpable. 
There at the White House stood Mr. Ra- 
bin, who was chid of staff of the Israeli 
Army when it defeated the armies of 
Egypt, Syria, and Jordan in 1967, along- 
side King Hussein, a descendant of Mo- 
hammed who had lost the holy places of 
Jerusalem to Israel in that war. 

At one point. President Bill Clinton told 
his aides how struck he was “by the per- 
sonal warmth between them and how they 
couldn’t talk enough together.” 

It took the peace agreement between the 
Israelis and the Palestinians both to free 
King Hussein and to force him to acceler- 
ate the pace of his peacemaking with Isra- 
el 

Suddenly, the Palestinians were making 
peace on their own. The king, whose coun- 
try's population is 80 percent Palestinian, 
was freed from the responsibility for the 
fate of the Palestinian people and their 
claim to Israeli-occupied land. 

He was also confronted with the pros- 
pect that the Palestinians would reap the 
benefits of peace in the Israeli -occupied 
territories without him. President Hafez 
Assad of Syria was holding back, but other 
Arab leaders were moving forward to re- 
ceive Israeli cabinet aides and beginning to 
negotiate joint economic projects. 

What finally impelled the king was his 
concern about economic security. 

He saw the value of the Jordanian dinar. 

See MIDEAST, Page 6 


Now, Whitewater as the Ultimate Insider’s Game 


By Howard Schneider 

Wa shin g t on Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — From the start it 
had the ring of a Beltway extravaganza, 
replete with weighty philosophy wrapped 
deep in bureaucratic prose, a few pew 
turns of phrase, and the inevitable partisan 
sparring. 

Nevertheless, a crowd packed into the 
House Banking, Housing and Urban Af- 
fairs Committee room on Tuesday to hear 
seemingly endless discussion of such ob- 
tuse issues as “recusals," “regulatory over- 
sight,” “redactions,” and “statutes of limi- 
tations.” 

The dissection of government minutiae 
went on so long that at one point Repre- 
sentative Maxine Waters, Democrat of 
California, deemed it “boring, uninterest- 
ing and uninformative.” 


“I’m sorry that we must spend our time 
here,” she said. The sentiment seemed 
shared by many. 

The most enticing of the thousands of 
government documents turned over for the 
congressional Whitewater hearings were 
excerpts of the private diaries of the Trea- 
sury chief of staff, Joshua Steiner, a young 
official so unaccustomed to Washington’s 
ways that be wrote about a secret White 
House meeting in a now-publicized love 
letter to a girlfriend. 

And even the diaries were dull, filled 
with agonizing over whether Mr. Steiner’s 
boss, Roger C Altman, should recuse him- 
self and what scoops he might read in The 
New York Times. 

This was, after all, a hearing on 
Whitewater’s “Washington phase”, as op- 
posed to file yet-to-come "Arkansas 


phase” that will deal with possible savings 
and loan fraud and involve a meticulous 
reconstruction of Bill Clinton’s personal 
finances. 

And as the committee ch a i rm a n , Henry 
B. Gonzalez, Democrat of Texas, rang the 
opening bell on this summer’s main event, 
it was dear that, for now, the hearings will 
be the ultimate insider’s game. 

Has the White House ^employed obfus- 
cating redaction techniques? ” Represen- 
tative Jim Leach, Republican of Iowa, 
asked in his opening statement, using col- 
lege words to ask what is really the central 
question of this set of hearings: Did the 
white House lie about a series of meetings 
between the Treasury Department and 
White House staff? 

The other central issue — whether the 

See HEARINGS, Page 6 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — King Hussein of 
Jordan and Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
of Israel vigorously reaffirmed before Con- 
gress on Tuesday their pursuit of peace in 
the Middle East. 

“I consider myself to be a soldier in the 
army of peace," Mr. Rabin declared. 

“The state of war between Jordan and 
Israel is over," King Hussein said, bringing 
the Senate and House to their feet, their 
applause echoing through the chamber. 

But their warmth and rapport, a day 
after they signed a landmark accord for- 
mally ending 46 years of hostility between 
Israel and Jordan, did not disguise that 
their political goals were not entirely paral- 
lel. 

“For our part, we will never forget Pal- 
estine," the king said, while also asserting 
that only God could ex erase sovereignty 
over the M uslim, Christian and Jewish 
holy sites in Jerusalem. 

Mr. Rabin, for his part, offered an emo- 
tional reminder of Israel's struggle for Je- 
rusalem and said that the city was “the 
heart of the Jewish people.” At the conclu- 
sion, he donned a yarmulke, the Jewish 
prayer cap, and intoned the ancient He- 
brew blessing to “our Lord who has pre- 
served us and sustained us and enabled us 
to reach this time." 

In the galleries sat Israelis who had lost 
family members in wars with the Arabs. 
Mr. Rabin read their names, and they 
stood and were applauded. 

Witnessing the historic event, the first 
occasion when two world leaders had ad- 
dressed a joint session of Congress at the 
same time, were cabinet officers, foreign 
ambassadors and Justice Ruth Bader 
Ginsberg of the Supreme Court. 

The two leaders later issued a sharp 
condemnation of recent terrorist attacks 
that threaten Middle East peace. Standing 
between them at a White House news 
conference, President Bill Clinton also de- 
nounced the bombings as the likely work 
of terrorists opposed to Middle East peace. 

S tanding between the leaders at a White 
House news conference, Mr. Clinton also 
denounced the bombings as the likely 
work of terrorists opposed to Middle East 
peace. “We will not, we must not, allow 
them to disrupt the peace process." he 
said. “We cannot allow the enemies of 
peace to prevail.'' 

King Hussein said Arabs and Israelis 
had to “live as members of one family” 
and denounced as “enemies of hope, ene- 
mies of security” those responsible for the 
bombing next to the Israeli Embassy in 
London on Tuesday. 

Mr. Rabin lashed out at “radical Islamic 
terrorists" he said were committed to 
blocking peace in tire region through vio- 
lence, including the London bombing and 
another of a Jewish community center in 
Buenos Aires. 

The declaration signed by the two men 
Monday was one of nonbelligerency, a 
step short of a formal peace treaty. The 
two leaders pledged in it “to bring an end 
to bloodshed and sorrow.” 

The immediate target of cooperation be- 
tween Israel and Jordan is bolstering the 
region’s economy by sharing scarce water 

See PEACE, Page 6 


Kiosk 


Hamas Offers 
Deal for Sheikh 

GAZA (Reuters) — The militan t 
Islamic movement Hamas offered to 
hand over the remains of an Israeli 
soldier killed five years ago in return 
for the release of its leader. Sheikh 
Ahmed Yassin, from an Israeli jail, a 
statement said Tuesday. The state- 
ment set a deadline later on Tuesday. 
The Israeli Defense Ministry had no 
immediate co mmen t 


Book Review 

Crossword 

Weather 


Page 7. 
Page 22. 
Page 22. 




Long-Distance Pom: Very Wrong Number for Parents 


A French nurse 
^rave in Zaire s 


ihA Ddn|iiiufRnnm 

, Rwandan boy Hiesday after he was puBed from a mass 
before be wonM hare been buried alive by baBdazers. 


Newsstand Prices 

Andorra 9.00 FF Luxembourg »L.Fr 

Antilles ...11^0 FF Morocco.....^..l2 Dh 

SSSSuM^ Qatar 

Egypt ....E-P-5000 R6onton....ll.2DFF 
Pronce 9.00 FF Saudi 

Gabon MOCFA Senegal ...-JOCFA 

300 Or. Spain 200PTA5 

IwrvCoast . 1 . 120 CFA Turkey ..T.L3&M0 

i JD U.A.E 830 Dim 

Letanon ...USS 1 SO U.S. Mit. (Eur.) *!-«_ 


m Down 

H &16 

I* 3735.66 

The Dollar 

Nbw Ymu~ _ 
PM ' 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


M 113.68 


1.583 

1-5244 

S&25 

5.4098 


By Elizabeth Kastor 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — At first. Bob assumed that the 
pricey long-distance calls an his June phone bill were to 
some small town in Ohio. Perhaps his live-in baby-sitter 
had been calling home. 

He was wrong. 

Moldova is not in Ohio. I: is a former republic of the 
Soviet Union, and the number that attracted more than 
$250 worth of calls from his house is not anybody’s 
home. 

“Hi, there,” the breathy female voice answered, via 
recording, when the Washington father called the inter- 
national numb er to check it ouL “Am I glad you called 
the hottest sex service available today! Whateve- your 
Vink, we can give you exactly what you’re looking for. 
For our notorious hot phone sluts, press 1." 


Bob chose not to select an option, but he began to 
thmk his 1 1 -year-old twin boys probably had. 

International phone sex ones are just one of the 
ingenious methods that the pornography industry has 
developed to separate callers from their money. This 
separation happens at $2.25 for the first minute and 
$112 for each additional minute, if you happen to be 
calling Moldova. 

The Federal Communications Commission and all the 
major phone carriers have received complaints about 
such international calls, and the number of complaints is 
rising . 

“We get parents saying, 'I've got a bill of $800 and 
$900 a day — 16, 17 calls a day. I didn’t call Zimba- 
bwe!* ” said Carol Aarhus, a spokeswoman for MCI. 
“When we inform the parents that it’s their children, 
oftentimes they are very embarrassed.” 


Most of the international calls to sex lines reach 
services in small places like Suriname, SIo Torn* or the 
Azores. Some countries allow the addition of hefty sur- 
charges to international calls, boosting the cost* even 
higher than the regular long-distance tariff. 

The international numbers are advertised in publica- 
tions such as Rolling Stone. Although the numbers 
include the international prefix of 01 1, many customers 
apparently do not recognize it or associate it with high 
charges. 

Both MCI and AT&T arc planning efforts to alert 
consumers about the sex lines. 

D onna T jim peri senior policy adviser to the common 
carrier bureau of the Federal Communications Commis- 
sion, said the agency was also monitoring complaints 

See SEX, Page 6 


t 








Car Bombing Near Israeli Embassy in London Wounds 13 world b biefs 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

Not York Times Seme c 


LONDON — A car bomb exploded next 10 
the Israeli Embassy in London on Tuesday, 
wounding 13 people and bringing warnings from 
Israeli officials of an international terrorist cam- 


paign by radical Islamic groups opposed to the 
’ East 


Middle East peace process. 

The bomb went off at 10 minutes past noon in 
Kensington district, across from Kensington Pal- 
ace on a gated street where cars must be cleared 
by the police to enter. 

The police said the car. a gray Audi sedan, had 
been parked in front of a small apartment braid- 
ing next to the embassy a few minutes before the 
explosion. They said the bomb appeared to have 


been made of 20 to 30 pounds (9 to 14 kilograms) 
of explosives stashed in the car’s trunk. 

There was no immediate claim of responsibil- 
ity for the explosion, followed by eight days a 
car bomb explosion at a Jewish community 
center in Buenos Aires, killing at least 96 people. 
A Lebanon-based Islamic group, the Partisans of 
God, took responsibility for that bombing. 

The London explosion also followed by one 
day the agreement in Washington by Israel and 
Jordan to end hostilities between their countries. 

In Washington, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
said Israelis and Jews all over the world faced 
“an international pail’' from radical Islamic 
opponents of Israel. 

^There is no doubt in my mind we face a wave 
of extreme Islamic radical terrorist movements 


in the Arab Muslim countries,” Mr. Rabin said 
in an interview with NBC “They have infra- 
structure all over the world — in the United 
Stales, in Europe, in Latin America.' 1 

Hie police in London offered no explanation 
as to how the car got past the security gate on the 
street, which is lined with about a dozen embas- 
sies. But at a news conference, Commander Da- 
vid Tucker, the head of the police's anti-terrorist 
squad, said the driver, whom he described as a 
woman between 55 and 60 years old, “Mediter- 
ranean” in appearance and carrying a Harrod's 
shopping bag, had been seen walking away from 
the car before the blast and was being sought for 


age to the embassy. But the most serious injury 
was a broken arm, a spokesman for Charing 
Cross Hospital said. 

“When we heard the explosion we immediate- 
ly laid down on the floor,” said Amir Maimon, 
the second secretary at the embassy.' “Right 
afterward we evacuated people from the embassy . 
to Hyde Park and sent people home. There was 
no panic. Everything is under control, and thank 
God we are all alive.** 


questioning. 
The expw 


explosion ripped open the front of the 
apartment building and caused extensive dam- 


Palace, several hundred yards 
away on the other side of the street, is home to a 
number of members of Britain’s royal family. ■ 
Several windows there were blown out by the 
explosion; Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth 
l Ts sister, was in the palace but sot hurt 


Gambia Coup Leader Appoints Aides 

BANJUL, GambMAITJ 

seized power in a coup m cSurOsa last weefc oni ueoa j a-™ 

hhnsdfiteS of state jW®** and 
Lieutenant Jammeb, 29, named a team 

he would organize electron as ^ nation. Sir 

Dswda Ka&aba Jawara, was ousted m a bloodless nwiimy 
on Friday. 

Indonesia Threatens New Censorship 


A 


Van Owner Is Held 
In Argentine Blast 


R ewers 

BUENOS AIRES — Argen- 
tine police have detained the 
owner of a delivery van believed 
to have been used in the bomb- 
ing of a Jewish community cen- 
ter here. President Carlos Saul 
Menem said Tuesday. 

At least 96 people were killed 
in the attack July 18 against the 
headquarters of the Delegation 
of Argentine Jewish Associa- 
tions. 

The investigation “is advanc- 
ing quickly," Mr. Menem told a 
radio interviewer. 

An Israeli general who took 
part in the rescue ef fort here 
said he believed a suicide 
bomber drove a Renault van 
packed with hundreds of 
pounds of explosives right up to 
the door of the building. 

“We’ve found parts of a vehi- 
cle with a corpse inside, which 
could be the driver’s," the gen- 
eral, Zeev Ltvne, told the daily 
Pagina/12. 

Mr. Menem did not identify 
the detained man, but said he 
would be questioned by Judge 
Juan Jose Galeano, who is 
heading the investigation. 

Judge Galeano returned late 
Monday from Caracas, where, 


according to local newspapers, 
he interviewed a former Iranian 
diplomat said to have informa- 
tion on the attack and the 1992 
bombing of Israel’s embassy in 
Buenos Aires. 

Israel suspects that Iran and 
Hezbollah, a fundamentalist 
guerrilla group based in Leba- 
non and supported by Iran, had 
a hand in both attacks. 

However, another group 
based in Lebanon, calling itself 
the Supporters of God, claimed 
responsibility for the bombing 
of last week. 

The Lebanese foreign minis- 
ter said in Beirut that there was 
no such group. 


Group damitt Air Crash 


U.S. and Panamanian inves- 
tigators have concluded that a 
bomb caused a plane crash in 
Panama last week that ltified 21 
people, most of them Jewish, 
the Panamanian president, 
Guillermo Endara, was quoted 
as saying Reuters reported. 
The Supporters of God group 
has claimed responsibility for 
the plane crash, as well as for 
the bombing of the Jewish com- 
munity center in Argentina. 



The warning came as Indonesian xnuaoans 

24Wmri?ma rattan al frjajaran Unwrap ■? ,be 

nn Tuesday to protest the media ban. An official 


oiweooy rorum 

Shopkeepers Riot in Central Lagos 

i agos rAFPl — Many people were injured in central Lagos 
on I TSy tfter a street® 

divided ova a. four-weefc-oki stoke aimed at bringing down 

"j- 

knives and cudgels, looters ransacked stores in the at/s commer- 
cial district, witnesses said- 


London police officers sweeping up the nibble cansed by the car bomb that exploded Tuesday 


D«wCMlkia/Tbe AMOchud Pk» 

the Israeli Embassy. 


UN Monitoring Stops Iraqi A - Weapons, but Saddam Survives 3S 


U.K. Newspaper Names New Editor 

LONDON (Renters) -—Britain's Independent newspaper, vio- 

tini of die cross fire in a vicious newspaper pru» war, appomted a 

middle of next month. .. . 

The Independent has been pushed to the sidelines m the battle 
between^^Rupert Murdoch of The Times and Conrad 
Blnckof TheDaiWTdaraph to grab arcnlatren by cutting pnees. 
Mr. H arg reave s said The independent would persevere through 
the price war but would uot say if it would cut its own price. 

EU Predicts Eradication of Rabies 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Cases of rabies havef alien dramatically 
ia the European Union, and die deadly disease may soon disappear 
from it entirely, the European Commission said Tuesday. 

The number of cases has detained fcy about 70 percent since 
1986, and only Germany, France,.Belgiuin, Luxembourg and Italy 
arc .now affected by the disease ^ can be confidently expected 
that rabies win be era&catortroai the European Union in the 
near future," the comn n ss roo said; ' 

China to Hasten Tibet Development 

BONG KONG (AFT) —Oana’s top leaders have decided to 
speed up the development of Tibet, exploiting its na t ural re- 
sources and introdnemg “potiticaHy reliable cadres," the official 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Times Service 

BAGHDAD — The video image flickering in 
a United Nations office here indicates that the 


monitoring system imposed on Iraq's industry is 
achieving its aim of preventing President Sad- 


dam Hussein from building weapons of mass 
destruction. 


But it also means that the oB embargo and 
other sanctions placed on Iraq after its invasion 
of Kuwait are closer to being lifted without 
having achieved their unstated aim — in the eyes 
of the United States and some other countries — 
of removing Mr. Saddam from power as welL 
A little green line, constantly expanding and 
contracting at the bottom of the screen in the UN 
office, means that the picture is bong relayed live 
from a camera trained on equipment on a factory 
floor somewhere in Iraq. 

The camera is part of a sophisticated system, 
requiring 20 tons of sensors and other electronic 
equipment, which the United Nations is install- 
ing in 30 key plants and which is designed to 
guarantee that Iraq does not develop nuclear, 
chemical or biological weapons or long-range 
rockets. 

Meanwhile, the second floor of the UN office 


A 90-meter (300-foot), red and white tower has 
just been completed to receive signals from all 
the remote-control cameras and sensors installed 
in factories around the country. The same tower 
will transmit radio signals from the control cen- 
ter to inspectors in the field. 

“This is the most sophisticated and intrusive 
industrial monitoring system ever devised," said 
Guy Martelle, an American engineer working on 
the project, which he said he expects to be fully 
operational by September. 

All this equipment, together with the regular 
checks that UN inspectors will make on some 
150 industrial sites that could be used to develop 
prohibited weapons, represents a political turn- 


Earlier this month, when the council last re- 
viewed the embargo, Rolf Ekeus, the Swedish 
head of the special commission, said the first part 
of his task was almost complete. 


Some documents relating to weapons pro- 

said he 


mg point in Iraq's troubled relations with the 
UN Secur 


Security CounriL 
As part erf the terms for ending the Gulf War 
in 1991, the council created the UN Special 
Commission and ordered it to eliminate Iraq’s 
of mass destruction and ensure that 
never acquired them again. When this 
has been done to its satisfaction, the council said, 
the embargo on Iraqi oil sales will have “no 
further force or effect." 


is being ripped apart as a high-security control 
isbufltfo 


center is built for an 80-person team that expects 
to be monitoring Iraqi industry for years to 
come. 


After first trying to hide his secret znSittuy 
programs and then obstructing the arms inspec- 
tors sent to ferret them out, Mr. Saddam now 
appears to be cooperating fully with the special 
commission in the hope that the council will lift 
the oil embargo early next year. 


grams are still ™ssmg - But Mr. Ekeus 
hoped to report “shortly that the full account 
of Iraq’s programs winch the council 
has been completed.” - 
The council must still adopt a resolution re- 
quiring companies selling equipment with mili- 
tary potential to Iraq to report such sales in the 
future so the UN monitors can ensure that it is 
not used in arms development 
But after a probationary period to make sore 
the monitoring system works — Mr. Ekeus sug- 
gested six months — the fecial commission now 
believes that it win be in a position next March to 
report that Iraq has complied with the Security 
Council's disarmament trams, indi c at i n g that die 
embargo should be lifted. 

All the evidence now- suggests that Iraq is 
determined to ensure that tire monitoring Systran 
works wefl. 

Last November, Mr. Saddam formally agreed 
to it In December, Iraq decreed that tampering 
with the monitoring system was “a major crime. 8 
And Mr. Ekeus said in a recent interview that he 
believed that Mr. Saddam had personally or- 
dered fun cooperation with the UN commission 
in May. 


“Cooperation is excellent," said JaakoYfitalo, 
the Finnish head of the UN team. "The Iraqis 
have created a special authority to work with us, 
and we have hundreds of them helping install die 
system.” 

But two major difficulties may still make the 
Security Council reluctant to lilt economic sanc- 
tions when the commission finds that Iraq has 
complied. • 

The first is Iraq's continuing attitude toward 
Kuwait, the Gulf emirate that Iraq annexed and 
invaded in 1990. While Iraq's nibber-stamp Par- 
hameut officially annulled the annexation after 
die Gulf War, the following year, dm govern- 
ment-con trofled news media m Baghdad contin- 
ue to refer to Kuwait as part of Iraq. 

The second difficulty is the attitude of. the 
Clinton administration, which appears to be fol- 
lowing in die footsteps of its predecessor, argu- 
ing that Iraq cannot 6c trusted to behave so long 
as Mr. Saddam remains in power. ‘ 

Referring to the UN commission by its diplo- 
matic shorthand, W. Anthony Lake, President 
BUI Clinton’s national security adviser, wrote in 
Foreign Affairs magazine in April: “There is 
plenty of evidence to suggest the only reason die 
Iraqi regime is beginning to cooperate with 
UNSCOM is to secure the bftingof on sanctions. 
Once the oH starts flowing again, Washington 
must assume Saddam wifl renege on long-term 
monitoring and begin rebuilding his weapons of 
mass destruction program.” 


at a national conference on Tibet in Beijing last week, 
president Jiang Zemin said that while die overall situation -was. 
stable, “there also exist some factors of instability in Tibet." He 
wanted, ’“Nbbody is pemritted to pursue independence or inde- 
pendence in disguised forms in Tibet.” * 


TRAVEL UPDATE 




UJ£* R^StrikeRiiB^ 


LONDON (ReutenT— Brifisb&nmratere faced three days of 
travel chaos as railroad signal workers began a strikeon Tbesday. . 

The strike, which will affect moist erf the nation's rail network, 
was due to nm until noon Thursday. It followed a series of six one- 
day stoppages. Thetfisputc involves pay and management propos- 
als to increase productivity through changes in work roles. 

The Gramm state of Haase reposed thp nation's first poDution- 
tinked meed Emits Tuesdayin an effort to lower the hot-weather 
levels or harmful ozone in the air. Drivers were told to stay at a 
maximum of 90 Iritaneters per hour (55 miles an hour) on the 
freeways. The speed finals wrae. to last at least 24 hours. (Reusers) 
The Greek minister of transportation, Theodoras Pangalos, 
accused air-traffic controllers in Athens who arc invoNed in a 
wonk-to-rale protest erf “sacfistic behavior” toward travelers. 
“People arc tortured for hours inside planes,” he said. “Flights are 
not only late, but the delays arc given after the passengers have 
boarded.”. (Reuters) 

China and Sotrih Korea have ^reed to open regular air routes 
linkin g Seoul to. Bajing and four other Chinese cities, press 
reports in Seoul said. Toe agreement provides for direct routes 
between Seoul and Beijin& Shenyang, Qingdao. Tianjin and 1 
Dalian. (ytEP) 


j _ 


a 


Eager for Trade, EU Seeks Compromise With Asia 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribute 

BANGKOK — The Europe- 
an Union, which wants to gam a 
bigger share of the booming 
markets of East Asia, sought 
Tuesday to improve relations 
that have been strained over 
moves by Europe to link trade 
and aid to human rights and 
labor and environmental stan- 
dards. 


In & significant change, EU 
officials attending an annual 
meeting with foreign ministers 
from the Association of South 
East Asian Nations outlined a 
new approach to Burma that 
shifts Europe’s position away 
from ostracism and closer to 
ASEAN's policy of "construc- 
tive engagement,” 


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Klaus Kinkel, the German 
foreign minister, who took over 
the rotating presidency of the 
EU Council of Ministers earlier 
this month, said that Europe 
was prepared to follow 
ASEAN’s lead and hold talks 
with the Burmese military re- 
gime on ending political repres- 
sion and restoring democratic 
rule. 


Europe had previously criti- 
cized (lie ASEAN approach of 
seeking to open Burma more 
widely to outside influences, 


saying that it ignored serious 
human rights anuses. 

However, European officials 
said Tuesday that a meeting be- 
tween senior EU representa- 
tives and the Burmese foreign 
minister was likely to take place 
in September at the United Na- 
tions in New York. It would be 
the first such meeting since the 
Burmese military crushed pro- 
democracy demonstrations in 
1988. 

Mr. Kinkel said that the EU 
wanted to “enter into a critical 
dialogue” with the Burmese 
junta. However, he added that 
it was up to the leadership in 
Rangoon to “ensure, by making 
real progress towards democra- 
cy and respect for human 
rights, that this does not remain 
a one-off meeting.” 

EU officials also gave assur- 


ances to ASEAN that Europe 
licy link- 


did not have a firm policy 


xng trade and aid to noneco- 
nomic issues and was prepared 
to negotiate. 

ASEAN officials welcomed 
the EU moves to reduce Motion 
with the group. But one official 
warned that ties bad been seri- 
ously strained by persistent 
problems with the EU in the 
past few years over human 
rights and other issues. 

In a joint communique, the 
ASEAN foreign ministers ex- 
pressed serious concern that the 
linkage of worker rights, labor 
standards and environmental 
issues to trade might become “a 
new pretext for protectionism" 
that could undermine progress 
in liberalizing world commerce. 

Hie EU is one of Southeast 
Asia’s major markets. Two-way 
trade was worth more than 42 
billion Ecus ($51 million) in 
1993, and ASEAN exports to 


Europe have increased at an av- 
erage rate of 20 percent a year 
since 1986. 


Earlier this year, ASEAN 
was at the forefront of a cam- 
paign by developing countries 
to block attempts by the United 
States and Europe to indude a 
"social clause” in (he recently 
concluded Uruguay Round erf 
global trade talks that would 
have made trade conditional on 
observing minimum labor stan- 
dards. 

In the face of this opposition. 
Western nations shelved the 
plan bat insisted that it should 
be an item on the agenda of the 
new World Trade Organization. 

Hans van den Broek, the EU 
commissioner for external po- 
litical relations, told reporters 
that linkages between trade and 
other issues wrae still open for 
negotiation. 


Go That Fast? 
InThatCar? 
Not Possible 


Reuters 

LONDON 1 — A motorist 
was cleared of a speeding 
charge when experts con- 
vinced a court that his car 
could not have reached the 
velocity. 

Rowley, 27, was 
accused by the police in the 
southern English county of 
Surrey of racing down an 
expressway at 117 mfles 
(190 kilonieters)-an hour. 

But experts from the 
Automobile Association, .a 
British motoring organiza- 
tion, testified that it was 
“mechanically impossible” 
for Ms Fiafnpo to go that 
fast, the reports said. 

The speed limit on Brit- 
ish freeways is 70 miles an 
hour. 


7 More Arrests Made 
In Neo-Nazi Rampage 


“i* 


. . Reuters 

BERLIN t 1 The police, 
seized seven more suspects on 
Tuesday after neo-Nazis ram- 
paged at die former Nazi 
Camp at Buchoiwald, brin g in g 
die total of arrests to right. 

-Prosecutors in Erfurt, capital 
of the eastern state of Thurin- 
gia, said the seven umdentified 
suspects were being hdd on ar- 
rest warrants for disturbing the 
peace and in one case fra* 
t hrea te ning bodgy harm. 

. A gang of 22 young neo-Na- 
zis stormed through the camp 
memorial Saturday, threa tening 
to bum a woman supervisor to 
death, shooting “Sieg Hcfl” 
throwing stones at bufldk 
and giving the Hitler xafo t c 
Hie police had been criti- 
cized for releasing several sos- 


after detaining them 1 
j. Israel's ambassador to; 
Germany, Avi Primor, said he. . 
found it bard to understand# 


why perpetrators of such at-J ‘ Kw 
tacks were so often released. • . 


■ Aides’ Convictions Upheld; 

Germany’s high court oc 
Tbraday upheld the convictions; 
of three dose aides to the for-* 
mer East German leader, E richr 
Honecfcer, for ordering the kiH-! 
ing of people trying to flee 
through the Cold War border to] 
uie West, Reuters reported 
from Berlin. . • 

The court rgected appeals 
from former Defense Minister 
Heinz Kessler; his deputy. Frits 
Streletz, arid Hans Albrecht, * 
district Communist Party boss,' 
against thrir convictions for in- 
citing manslaughter. 


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* POLITICAL \on:s+ 


Children’s Healthcare: Who Can Say No? 

M y A ®®Np , rON — George J/_Mitt*eiL. DmK5crai of 
wuneand the Senate majority leader, says he win seek quick 
acuon to provide health insurance fair, most children who do 
not have it in the health care legislation he wiB offer to the 
Senate next week. 

While zn most respects his proposal would produce slower 
progr ess toward universal health coverage t ha n plan 
proposed by President BiU Chuton, Mr, Mitchell said that 
ThBB^one area where we are trying to accel erate impl emen- 

His bill would add several millio n chil dren to the insurance 
rolls . perhaps within a year or so. He did not spell out how this 
or other dements in his bill would be paid for. 

wbich he said he is still be working out, seems 
likely to give a political lift to the hill “I don’t know anybody 
who wants to be on the wrong side of *^ gT question,” said 
Sarntor Christopher J. Dodd,' Democrat of Connecticut and a 
leading children's advocate in the Senate. When he hears the 
idea discussed, be said, “I don’t hear the traditional hemming 
and hawing.” 

Die proposal is being worked oat in consultation with the 
White House, which issued a bland statement saying: “The 
administration is fighting for guaranteed health care covera ge 
for children and all other Americans. And as we previously 
stated, we are flexible about how universal coverage is phased 

_ A House leadership aide said the idea had not come up in 
discussions about the bill that Richard A. Gephardt of Mis- 
souri, the House majority leader, would offer. 

While most of the other concepts being pondered by Mr. 
Mitchell and. Mr. Gephardt haveheen under in tense discus- 
sion in one form or another for months, this idea has not. 

• •' - (NYT) 


Clinton Aide Faces Trtal Over Task Force 

WASHINGTON — Judge Royce C. Lamberth of u.s. 
District Court ordered the White House health care adviser, 
Ira C. Magazines:, and other administration officials to stand 
trial in a lawsuit over the administration’s secret Health Care 
Task Force. ' 

Judge Lamberth said holding a trial with witnesses nndw 
oath was die only way he could learn the truth about the 
membership and structure of a working group and .several 
subcommittees that did the legwork for President Bill Clin- 
ton’s now-disbanded task force, 

U I cannot determine at tins stage of the proceedings who 
can be believed,” the judge said during a hearing in a lawsuit 
brought by three groups in 1993 to open die task force’s work 
to the public; 

The witnesses in. a trial would include Mr. Magazine? and, 
possibly, Hillary Rodham Clinton, who led the task force. 

The Federal Administrative Procedures Act allows only ■ 
“groups comprised wholly of full-time federal officers or 
employees of the federal government” to meet in secret 
Kent Mastcrson Brown, an attorney, said his investigation 
showed that at least 357 people who worked the groups 
were not on the government’s payroll. The judge put off ruling - 
on a reguest to Bold Mr. Magazmer in contempt of court for 
saying m sworn court documents that the panels were highly 
organized and comprised of government employees and then 
later painting a picture of a. more chaotic, looser process. 
Lawyers for the Association of American Physicians and 
Surgeons Inc., the American Council for Health Care Reform 
and the National Legal A Policy Center daimed victory. 
Mark Stem, a Justice Dep artm ent lawyer, declined comment, 
saying, “The order speaks for itself.” (WP) 

N>w Top Economist for Labor Secretary 

WASHINGTON — A Princeton University economist, 
Alan Krueger, has been recruited bythe Clinton adrtiinistra- 
tiort to serve as chief eccmomist and asenickr poBcy adviser at 
the Labor Department. ... 

Mr. Krueger, a professor of economics and public affairs, 
will replace Larry Katz, who is returning to Harvard Univer- 
sity after a two-year leave of absence. Both Mr. Katz and Mr. 
Krueger are in their cady 30s and considered firing academic 
stars in the field of labor economics. 

As chief economist, Mr. Krueger win assume a major policy 
role at the department for Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich. 
Department officials described Mr. Katz as one of Mr. 
Reich's top palicy advisers during the past years and predict 
ed a similar role for Mr. Krueger, who has worked with Mr. 
Reich before. Mr. Krueger mil start his new job Aug 72. 

. . (WP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Senator Jesse Helms, the North Carolina Republican, com- 
menting on a performance partly financed by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, of whose activities he has often been 
critical: “Calling thin perverse, filthy and revolting garbage 
art doesn’t make it art. It’s still filth.” (AP). 


Away From Politics 


• Exxon Corp. bos agreed to pay $20 million to 3^00 Alaskan 
native villagers who alleged in a federal lawsuit that the 
Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989 had ruined their hunting 
grounds. The agreement affects roughly a quarter of the 
residents and fishermen who are seeking billions of dculars 
from Exxon. The settlement must be approved by a federal 
district judge. 

• John BobMtt, whose penis was diced off by Ms wife, Lorma, 
last year, has pleaded not guilty in Las Vegas, Nevada, to a 
charge of battering a former girlfriend, Knstina Hfiott. He 
said he was “absolutely 100 percent not gri}ty, -. echoing the 
words that O.J. Simpson used in pleading not .guuty^ to 
murdering his ex-wife and a friend of hers. He said he bad 

chosen the words because when he was growmgiqi m rarffelo. 

New York, Mr. Simpson, then a r unnin g bade for the Buffalo 
Bills in the National Football League, was his hero. 

• The Reverend Jesse L. Jackson has accused television 

networks of “institutional racism” and has encouraged view- 
ers to boycott those that refuse to schedule programs with 
positive "»hnic images or that do not place nun on ties m 
dedsion-malting positions. NTT.APiLAT. Reuters 


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Simpson Prosecutors Con Begin DNA Testing on Blood 


La Angela Tones Service 
LOS ANGELES — Prosecutors in the 
O J. Simpson murder case have won the 
right to begin subjecting blood samples 
to DNA tests that may be able to show 
whether Mr. Simpson was at the murder 
scene and whether any of the victims’ 
blood ended up at his estate. 

Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito 
made his ruling after a contentious hear- 
ing where prosecution and defense at- 
torneys argued over procedures for try- 
ing to establish the source of bloodstains 
found near the bodies of Nicole Brown 
and Ronald L. Goldman, as 
l as other stains found in and around 
Mr. Simpson’s Brentwood mansion. 

Mrs. Sinmson, Mr. Simpson’s former 
wife, and Mr. Goldman, a friend of hers, 
were found slashed to death on June 12. 
Mr. Simp son, accused in both killings, 
has pleaded not guilty. 

At the end of the hearing Monday, 
Judge Ito said government experts could 


begin conducting their tests on Thurs- 
day. He also ruled that a defense expen 
could attend the testing and could re- 
serve 10 percent of each sample for pos- 
sible further testing 

■ DNA Teste’ Pros and Gins 

Each of the two DNA tests at the 
center of the sparring between prosecu- 
tors and Mr. Simpson’s defense team 
has strengths and limitations. The New 
York Times reported. 

The more conclusive of the two tests, 
used to determine whether two tissue 
samples came from the same person, is 
known as RFLP, for restriction frag- 
ment length polymorphisms. It exam- 
ines regions of the genetic material — 
from blood, saliva, tissue or a hair folli- 
cle — where particular, small segments 
of DNA are repeated over and over 
again, a sort of molecular stutter. 

Different people have different num- 
bers of repeated segments. If one person 



OJF. Simpson listening to 
Judge Ito at the 


has a segment repeated, say, 300 limes, 
that would distinguish him or her from 
someone whose segment is repeated 100 
limes. 

But the test requires a relatively large 
sample, about 5.000 cells, or one-twenti- 
eth of a drop of blood. And the sample 
must be in good condition, said Dr. 
Robert E. Gaensslen, the director of the 
forensic science program at the Univer- 
sity of New Haven in West Haven. Con- 
necticut 

The second test a newer method 
known as the PCR test for polymerase 
chain reaction, can use as few as '50 cells, 
which could be found in a minute speck 
of blood, and the cells can be somewhat 
degraded. 

It can determine with certainty if a 
defendant's blood is not in die sample, 
but it is less definitive than the RFLP 
test in identifying whose blood is in the 
sample. In criminal cases, that often 
means the test is more definitive in prov- 


ing someone not guilty than in establish- 
ing guilt. 

The PCR test looks at several distinct 
genes with sequences that can vary 
slightly from person to person. Using an 
enzyme that copies each gene over and 
over again, investigators can build up 
enough copies of the genes to accurately 
ascertain their sequences. 

If the gene sequences in the tissue 
samples at the crime scene do not match 
a defendant's sequences, the cells could 
not have come from the defendant. If 
they do match the defendant's gene se- 
quences. there is a good chance that they 
are the defendant's cells. 

The RFLP test can make a positive 
match of two samples with the odds of 
an error ranging from one in tens of 
thousands to one in hundreds of thou- 
sands. When the PCR test indicates a 
match, however, the chance that the 
sample came from a different person is 
more like one in thousands. Dr. Gaenss- 
len said. 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


It’s Getting Tougher 
For a Boy to Be One 

Boys will be boys, Natalie; 
Angier writes in The New 
York Times. Boys will be noisy 
and obnoxious. They will tear 
around the house and break! 
things. “They will swagger and 
brag and fib and not do their 
homework and leave their! 
dirty underwear on the bath- 
room floor.” But when they 


fall down, theyTl get up with- 
out a whimper. They will be 
adventurous and brave. 

Today, Miss Angier la- 
ments, the world is no longer 
safe for boys. A boy being a 
shade too fidgety, impulsive, 
disruptive or easdy bored risks 
finding himself under the scru- 
tiny of parents, teachers, guid- 
ance counselors or child thera- 
pists. 

Perhaps he is suffering from 
attention-deficit hyperactivity 
disorder, or ADHD, the dis- 
ease of the hour and the most 
frequently diagnosed behav- 
ioral disorder of childhood. 
Does he prefer computer 
games and goofing off to 


homework? He might have 
dyslexia. 

“There is now an attempt to 
pathologize what was once 
considered the normal range 
of behavior of boys,” said Mel- 
vin Kounerof the departments 
of anthropology and psychia- 
try at Emory University in At- 
lanta. “Today, Tom Sawyer 
and Huckleberry Finn surely 
would have been diagnosed 
with both conduct disorder 
and ADHD” 

To be fair, many children do 
have genuine medical and psy- 
chological problems, and they 
benefit enormously from the 
proper treatment. 

Researchers say boys may 


be diagnosed with behavioral 
syndromes and disorders more 
often than girls because their 
brains are more vulnerable. As 
a boy is developing in the 
womb, his male hormones ac- 
celerate the maturation of his 
brain, locking a lot of the nerve 
pathways in place early on; a 
girl’s hormonal bath keeps her 
brain supple far longer. 

Short Takes 

A Pittsburgh judge disnassed 
a rape charge after the prose- 
cutor said a recent Pennsylva- 
nia Supreme Court r uling had 
invalidated the case because 
the woman had not fought 
back although she had repeat- 


edly said “no” to her attacker. 
The McKean County District 
Attorney. Charles J. Duke, 
also said a state law that de- 
fines rape as involving the use 
of physical or psychological 
force must be changed. 

“What police say, and what 
everyone m rape cases say's, is 
that if you are in the situation 
of bring raped, don’t resist,” 
he said. “That can only cause 
greater injury to oneself.” 

A bill now in the state legis- 
lature would make sexual in- 
tercourse without consent a 
crime. 

“The ultimate intimacy is an 
act so fraught and resonant 


that a couple probably 
shouldn’t do it before they 
have a candid and detailed dis- 
cussion," Judith Stone writes 
in The New York Tunes. “I 
mean, of course, renting a vid- 
eo together.” 

She suggests that the film 
industry start splicing hybrid 
films for couples who are 
hopelessly incompatible, such 
as ‘Terminators of Endear- 
ment,” “My Own Private Ben- 
jamin ” “Honey, I, Claudius, 
Blew Up the Kids,” “Pretty 
Woman Under the Influence” 
and “Scenes From a Mall and 
the Night Visitors." 

International Herald Tribune. 


North Korea Reported 
To Seek Pact With U.S. 


Spy Is Told by U.S. to Keep His Story to Himself 


Agatee France- Prase 

TOKYO — North Korea 
wants a security treaty with the 
United States to improve bilat- 
eral relations, according to a 
news report here Tuesday. 

Kyoao News Service quoted 
a source as saying in New York 
on Tuesday mat North Korea 
welcomes the UJS. presence in 
East Asia and wants a security 
pact with Washington as a mili- 
tary and political counter- 
weight to Japan and other na- 
tions. 

. .The : unidentified source in 
the United States is in frequent 
contact with the government of 
North Korea, the news service 
said. 

“A North Korean official of 
ministerial level has repeatedly 
told me about the country’s ex- 
pectation to conclude some 
kind of agreement” with the 
United States on security and 
defense, the source was quoted 
as saying. 

The united States maintains 
military forces in South Korea 
but has no diplomatic relations 
with North 


High-level talks between 
Washington and Pyongyang, 
suspended following the death 
of President Kim II Sung of 
North Korea on July 8, are ex- 
pected to resume in Geneva on 
Aug. 5. 

■ Shots Fell North Korean 

A North Korean soldier was 
presumed killed by shots fired 
on the northern side of the bor- 
der dividing Korea, Reuters 
quoted a Seoul Defense Minis- 
try spokesman as saying Tues- 
day. 

The spokesman said 30 to 40 
rounds were heard Monday 
morning while five North Kore- 
an soldiers were heading north 
from the Demilitarized Zone di- 
viding the Korean Peninsula. 

"One man fell down, three 
took him to a barracks and then 
took him away on a truck,” he 
said. “We presume a soldier was 
either killed while resisting or 
that he killed himself. 

The spokesman did not rule 
out the possibility of an at- 
tempted defection. 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Peer Service 

WASHINGTON — At the request of 
the Justice Department, the confessed spy 
Aldrich H. Ames has stopped giving inter- 
views to reporters, according to his attor- 
ney, Plato Cacheris. 

Mr. Ames was described last week by 
the CIA director, R. James Woolsey Jr., as 
a greater traitor than Benedict Arnold who 
was “trying to reinvent himself and will 
doubtless soon step into the media spot- 
light as an objective and veteran commen- 
tator on the intelligence game." 

Mr. Ames, who with his wife, Rosario, 
pleaded guilty in April to espionage 
charges, has given interviews in the Alex- 


andria, Virginia, jail to five □< 
reporters, met with a book writer, and held 
meetings with several television personal- 
ities, according to sources. 

Two weeks ago, after congressional 
aides protested to the Justice Department 
that they were not allowed to meet with 
Mr. Ames while reporters were, govern- 
ment lawyers considered filing a court mo- 
tion to prevent Mr. Ames from giving press 
interviews, sources said. They reached 
agreement last week with Mr. Cacheris 
that there will be no more sessions, at least 
until after Mrs. Ames's sen ten ring in late 
AtlgUSL 

Under his guilty plea agreement. Mr. 
Ames cannot disclose classified informa- 


tion he learned while he was a government 
employee. He is barred from profiling 
from any book or film “describing his 
work at the CIA, his espionage activities, 
or the facts and circumstances leading to 
his arrest and conviction." 

“We can’t stc 
press,” an ( 

sure he complies with the agreement” 

Until now, Mr. Cacheris has sat in on 
the interviews. In the future, a government 
lawyer said, “someone from the govern- 
ment may sit in or we’ll have a prepublicar 
tion review of any interview Ames partici- 
pates in to be sure no classified 
information is being released.” 


in’t stop him from talking to the 
i official said. “All we can do is be 


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In Memory of My Brother 
MOHAMMAD REZA PAHLAVI 
The Late Shah of Iran 


July 27, 1994 marks the 14th anniversary of the passing of my beloved brother Mohammad Reza 
Pahlavi, the late Shahanshah of Iran. With him passed the hope that brightened Iran's future and the spark 
that kindled the memory of its past glories. Iran has now become an unreal country, a land of phantoms, 
where the people are forced to fight over issues that have little to do with what creates power and 
opportunity in the real world. Everywhere the superficial is cast as the fundamental: women's dress is held 
to be more important than their spirit, their hair is considered more potent than their mind, the sound of their 
voice more threatening than the content of their speech. Women count for little. Men, too, have no rights 
except those the regime sees fit to grant them. Hopes are dashed, the future is bleak, and depression reigns. 

The economy is in a shambles. Over the years, the industrial infrastructure has eroded. The reserves 
in productive capability built before the revolution are now practically exhausted. A culture of brokers and 
meddlers has displaced the will for constructive work. Middlemen abound. Graft has become a way of life, 
a vital necessity in order to feed the children and the unemployed. To survive, honest people have had to 
become con-men, street-wise operators. 

As oil prices plummet and inflation soars, the Islamic Republic is caught in a dilemma. It can neither 
afford the subsidies that sustain the middle class and the poor nor cut them. Over the years, it has 
accumulated debt that has now proven difficult to manage, not because the debt is exorbitant, but because 
the regime is incompetent. It can neither pay its short term debt without foregoing future development, nor 
afford to reschedule payment in accordance with its announced development plans, since it needs to have 
ready access to foreign exchange in order to pay for staple goods that inflation has put out of people's reach 
and to satisfy the demands of its own illegitimate greed. The so-called moderates, the custodians of "political 
pragmatism" and economic planning, have now been shown for the sham they are. As pressure builds, the 
mullahs fall back on the original dogma, but to no avail. Fundamentalism is on the rise among the ruling 
clerics, but practically inoperative everywhere else. Nowhere in the Islamic world is fundamentalism less 
sought and more shunned by the people than across the Iranian plateau— geographically and socially. 

In the meantime, the poor and the middle class, particularly the women and children among them, 
suffer. They have no way out so long as this regime lasts. Not even the leaders keep up the pretense any 
more. As the population increases, political and technological isolation persists, infrastructure erodes, 
education continues to lack substance and relevance, and oil is depleted, all hopes wane. Unlike the years 
following Khomeini's death, when the Islamic Republic touted economic reconstruction and development and 
promised a future that brought to mind an image resembling Iran under the Shah, emphasis now has fallen 
back on the spiritual acceptance of poverty and deprivation. It is the ruling mullahs' way of misusing Islam. 
Iranians, however, have become wise to the chicanery of the clerics who sell religion for power and private 
gain. They no longer buy what the devil sells in God's name. 

As I ponder the fate of my country, I am reminded of the year when my father first took over the 
reigns of government Then, also, Iran was on the verge of disintegration. Power belonged to the reactionary 
and the bigoted. The clergy ruled the soul of the people. Women, imprisoned within the house and covered 
in black, particularly despaired. The first Pahlavi changed Iran’s history by setting the nation on a different 
course. Although forces beyond his control did not allow him to finish his work, he built a solid 
infrastructure on which my brother helped build a society that I know will withstand whatever adverse forces 
fate may unleash. I am now confident that what the Pahlavis built in Iran cannot be undone. The two kings 
moved with history. The second PahJavi, particularly, prodded time forward because he believed Iranians 
deserve and can achieve the best if they move with resolve and deliberate speed. The course he set for Iran, 
we now know, is the course we shall have to return to if we are to fulfill our destiny. 

God bless his soul. 

Achraf Pahlavi 
12 Avenue Montaigne 
Paris 75008 
France 

























I 


Page 4 



Ilcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TI.YIIfi' *NB THE WASHINGTON POST 


Filling In the Peace Map 

Next Syria and Lebanon 


Israel and Jordan moved the map of a 
peaceful Middle East a large step closer 
to completion on Monday when they 
agreed to end 46 years of forma] bellig- 
erency and begin normalizing their rela- 
tions. A peace treaty is still months 
away, but already the two countries are 
ready to resolve concrete issues like 
boundaries and water rights, open direct 
telephone communications across the 
Jordan and work together against what 
remains of the Arab economic boycott. 

President Bill Clinton rightly placed 
this Washington Declaration in the se- 
quence that began with the Camp David 
agreements with Egypt and included 
last September's accords with the Pales- 
tine liberation Organization. 

For the first time in Israel's history, 
most of its borders are peaceful. Only 
Syria and Lebanon remain without 
agreements, and progress on those 
fronts may not be far off. 

Israel’s accords with the FLO made it 
both possible and urgent for King Hus- 
sein to move ahead. It was possible be- 
cause Jordan, with a large Palestinian 
population of its own, cannot now be 
accused of dealing behind the back of 
the PLO. It was urgent to protect Jor- 
dan’s economic position in the West 


Rank and religious rights in Jerusalem 
Arab claii 


from rival Arab claims. 

Jordan’s Hashemite rulers have been 
more nuanced in their relations with 
Israel than Egypt under the late Presi- 
dent Gamal Abdel Nasser or the PLO 
before Yasser Arafat embraced diplo- 
macy and peace. Yet Jordanian armies 
fought Israel in 1948 and 1967. Now 
King Hussein, who claims descent from 
the Prophet Mohammed, and Yitzhak 


Rabin, who made his name as a soldier 
in Israel’s wars for survival, have openly 
taken the path to peace. 

Monday’s declaration is fresh evi- 
dence that the Middle East is adapting 
to the changed environment after the 
Cold War. Religious and territorial ri- 
valries may have been at the heart of the 
conflict, but superpower competition 
encouraged both sides to pursue mili- 
tary rather than diplomatic strategies. 

After the Gaza-Jericho agreement in 
May, Jordan felt that it could no longer 
afford to stay aloof. Peace for Israel 
with Syria and Lebanon will be harder, 
but Monday’s declaration will increase 
the pressure on President Hafez Assad 
of Syria, who speaks for both countries, 
to make a deal. 

King Hussein, who saw his grand- 
father murdered 43 years ago for deviat- 
ing from the solid Arab front against 
Israel, would not have taken the risks he 
now accepts unless he believed that Syr- 
ia and Saudi Arabia, for all their pro- 
tests about a “separate peace,” would 
not retaliate against Jordan. His country 
is financially and militarily vulnerable 
to outside pressure, all the more so after 
it alienated the United Stales, Saudi 
Arabia and their allies by opposing the 
forcible expulsion of Iraq from Kuwait. 

Any residual American coolness to- 
ward Jordan over that episode should be 
put to rest by Monday's declaration. 
Mr. Rabin himself will now urge Con- 
gress to approve the $700 million debt 
forgiveness measure for Jordan that the 
Clinton administration seeks. By heed- 
ing his plea. Congress can reinforce Jor- 
dan's initiative for peace and encourage 
Syria and Lebanon to complete the new 
map of Middle East peace, 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Jordanians for Peace 


The latest success of the step-by-step 
Middle East peace strategy followed by 
successive American presidents is Mon- 
day’s Hussein-Rabin handshake at the 
White House. First Egypt, then the PLO, 
now Jordan. Hie only other significant 
neighbor of Israel remaining outside the 
ring of prospective accord is Syria, which, 
when it r ’ ■’ 


Of Israel's neighbors, Jordan was 
ways the best candidate for reconcilia- 
tion. Not so mnch by intent or ideology 
as by a woeful series of historical and 
political miscues has the essentially mod- 
erate King Hussein lagged behind. For he 
needed Israel — needed it to offset Arab 
forces far more threatening to his country 
and rule. That made him the adversary 
likeliest to become an ally. 

Now finally circumstances are right 
Iraq is broken and Syria isolated. The 
PLO’s Yasser Arafat has committed to 
autonomy. Israel, having accepted the 
PLO as its West Bank interlocutor, no 
longer has trouble moving to normalize 
ties with Jordan. The king is the Muslim 
world’s leading exemplar of co-opting 
extremists; an “overwhelming majority” 
of his countrymen, he said proudly on 
Monday, favor peace. He has earned re- 
spect not just for his survival but for his 


governance. And now Jordan is free to 
spin with Israel a web of common inter- 
ests that must be broadened to include 
Palestinians, too. 

Bill Clinton inherited a Mideast out- 
look that promised to substitute a unify- 
ing resistance to extremism for a dividing 
Arab- Israeli dispute. To advance the un- 
doing of that dispute has been the special 
mission of Secretary of State Warren 
Christopher. The Clinton and Bush ad- 
ministrations could not have made a dif- 
ference, however, but for Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin’s determination to, as he 
put it on Monday, “take risks for peace.” 
Primarily this has mean t abandoning 

dreams of territorial expansion and enter- 
ing a realistic negotiation with the PLO. 

with Jordan, Israel has now formally 
ended a state of war. The next step is to 
exchange territory for peace with Syria. 
The supposedly shrewd President Hafez 
Assad has sat passively and “lost” not 
only the company of Egypt, Jordan and 
the Palestinians but also the patronage of 
the old Soviet Union. Israel has sent a 
double message, pressing a war against 
Syria's radical Hezbollah charges but of- 
fering a respectable peace as well. The 
United Stales can help out the process 
with diplomatic and material aid, but the 
hard choices now fall to Israel arid Syria. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Whitewater on the Hill 


President BBl Clinton was right to say 
that the start of Tuesday’s Whitewater 
hearings was not exactly the moment the 
nation had been waiting for. But the 
White House has it wrong when it sug- 
gests that this week’s bearings before the 
House and Senate banking committees 
are a waste of time and taxpayers' money. 

This initial phase of the Whitewater 
inquiry zeroes in on the propriety of 
contacts between White House and 
Treasury Department officials involving 
the Resolution Trust Corporation’s 


Mr. Fiske stayed away from the Ques- 
tion of whether Treasury or White 
House staff crossed any ethical fines 
when they conferred over the Resolu- 
tion Trust Corporation’s request for a 
criminal inquiry that had named the 
Clintons as “potential beneficiaries” of 
funds from the failed Madison. On this 
score, the roles of Deputy Treasury Sec- 


retary Roger Altman, Treasury General 
lel Jeai 


and Loan failure. A second phase, ad- 
dressing White House handling of Dep- 
uty White House Counsel Vincent Fos- 
ters papers after his death, will wait 
until the conclusion of independent 
counsel Robert Fiske’ s investigation, 
now reset for the end of August. 

The drctrmstances surrounding Mr. 
Foster's suicide will be examined by the 
Senate committee but not by the House 
committee, whose chairman. Represen- 
tative Henry Gonzalez, sees little cause 
for unnecessarily treading over painful 
ground without having evidence to chal- 
lenge Mr. Fiske’s conclusion that Mr. 
Foster died by suicide for reasons un- 
related to Whitewater. 

The independent counsel has already 
answered one important question that 
arose from revelations about White 
House and Treasury huddles. After haul- 
ing the key players before a special grand 
jury, Mr. Fiske concluded that there was 
“insifficient” evidence to bring a crimi- 
nal prosecution against anyone. 


Counsel Jean Hanson, former White 
House Counsel Bernard Nussbaum and 
even the Clintons loom large. 

Until more information about White 
House and Treasury meetings began to 
appear, Mr. Altman and the White 
louse had given the impression that 

k 


impr 

they were only tangentially involved in 


talks about the Resolution Trust Corpo- 
ration’s referral and possible civil fraud 
suits. Documents ana diaries maintained 
within the Treasury tell another story. 
They suggest that Treasury and White 
House staff were caught up in sophomor- 
ic political intrigue and a misguided ef- 
fort to protect the first family, and in- 
sinuated themselves into matters that 
were none of their business. At best, they 
politically embarrassed their president. 

The possibility that an official such as 
Mr. Altman, who was running the Reso- 
lution Trust Corporation at the time, 
was more involved than be let on in 
public, and was leas than candid with 
Congress about his White House con- 
tacts, makes him a central figure in this 
controversy. But he is not alone. Con- 
gress has much to son out. 

—THE WASHINGTON 'POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Cit'Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher S Chief Executive 
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Relief Repatriation , Protection 



•^ASHINGTON — How Rwanda 


became the worst h umani tarian di- 
saster in the world is a story to be dissect- 
ed after the refugee death rates begin to 
come down. Suffice it to say that there is 
plenty of blame to go around for failing 
to get involved earlier. For months the 
United States and the international com- 
munity let genocide play out in Rwanda. 
As In Bosnia, early action would have 
saved hundreds of thousands of lives. 

Now only the logistical capacities of 
the U.S. ana other militaries can save the 
almost 2 million refugees who have fled. 
After a somewhat hesitant White House 
start, the U.S. mflrtaiy is getting into high 
gear led by the e halrmar of the Joint 
Chiefs, General John SbafikashviU, with 
the san» gusto as when he commanded 
the rescue effort for the Kurds in 1991. 

Some Americans may ask why the 
United States is doing most of the rescue 
job. The answer is t hat the U.S. military 
has most of the world’s capacity to deliv- 


By Lionel Rosenblatt & « *H**f?± 

did quickly 



id over 
should be 

urging the NATO allies to commit their 
military machines to the operation. 
Countries not playing a direct role 
should help pay the freight. 

In the days ahead, Rwandans — refu- 
gees and internally displaced —will con- 
tinue to die in large numbers. The world 
should concentrate on making every hour 
count in saving them. But it must also 
look ahead to the next challenges. 

Beyond Coma, there are refugee flows 
to Bukavu and further south. United Na- 


tions and UJ5. forces should swiftly take 

cho! 


lent 


preventive action to head off 
there before it starts. 

The UN and U.S. forces should dy- 
namically encourage voluntary repatria- 
tion. Even as refugees are bong stabi- 
lized along the Zaire border, every effort 


UN should quickly move from 

Gama, Zaire, and Entebbe, Uganda, to 
Kigali and other points in Rwnda. In- 
centives to return would get refugees 
home so that they can harvest their crops 
before they rot Repatriation kits and 
UN monitors to aBay refugee security 
concents should be put in place. Now 
that radio broadcasts idling refugees to 
leave have ceased, there should be broad- 
casts to encourage them to return borne. 

The United States should supply 
transport, equipment and logistics sup- 
port to ensure early deployment of an 
expanded UN Assistance Mission force 
in<aA> Rwanda, which would help stabi- 
lize the situation and guarantee protec- 
tion for returning refugees. 

United Nations troops in Rwanda 
should ensure that the defeated Rwan- 
dan soldiers in Zaire are not permitted to 
return with retrieved weapons or re-. 


poop, and that thaw lespasiWe for 

toNc a "umb er of U S, agencies, Presi- 
dent KH CBnton should P 01 ® ^ zn ® r 
official m charge with fid! manned au- 
thority over aB US. components- 
The United Nations should, putn 
‘place an overall commander, or inter- 


national stature, to coradiaato 


shek- 
el State and other countries in this 

of the futureis tobuUd 
an international system to head*? 
humanitarian emagenaes before iney 
get cut of controL 


The writer, president rf Rnfug^s I *f er ~ 


NATO countries to mount a tmhtary res- 
cue operation. He contributed Vasco m- 
maittoihc International Herald Tribune. 


Russia: If We Can’t Beat Them, Maybe We Should Join Them 


^yASHINGTON — In April 


to a 


my wife called to tdl me 
that our apartment in Moscow 
bad been robbed. Everything was 
taken, including threadbare zatioo, 91 
clothing and wedding 
Just the day before, my wife 
had returned from America with 
many expensive things — a video 
recorder, a camera, clothing and 


By Nikolai Zlobin 


jewelry. There is no doubt that 
hertnpf 


r trip from Sheremetyevo Inter- 
national Airport to our apart- 
> follower 


this year by Public 

_ orgam- 
t of Muscovites 
ex p e ri ence fear in their daily fives. 

The victories of Vladimir Zhir- 
inovsky’s Liberal Democratic Par- 
ty Of the rVimmiTniRtc jq fast 
December’s parliamentary elec- 
tions were not surprising. Mr. 
Zhirinovsky’s claim that social 


meat was followed by profession- 
als. Most serious crimes in Russia 
now appear to be masterminded 
in this way, and the situation 
seems increasingly hopeless. 

While the police were malting a 
list of our stolen possessions, they 
were called three times about 
murders in the vicinity. 

As if in Dante’s inferno, Rus- 
sian crime appears to be orga- 
nized into three large circles. 

The first is characterized by 
street fighting and gangsterism. 
Russians run up against such 
crime nearly every day. According 


problems must be dealt with by 
force is 


welcomed by many, who 
recall safe streets and homes dor- 


second circle of crime is 
made op of well-organized groups 
who aim higher than street rob- 
beries and burglaries. They trade 
in arms, narcotics and raw mate- 
rials like plutonium and copper at 
home and abroad. These groups 
are not interested in eco nomi c 
and political stability. Anarchy is 
the key to their success. They 
want nothing more than a fast 
return on then investments. 

These operators often employ 


the cnmtnCTti c riminal < of The first 
circle. They also buy the support 
of low- to middle-rank officials. 

Although organized crime is 
not monolithic, and dashes be- 
tween various groups occur, a 
co mm on language ot thieves ex- 
ists among the new business en- 
trepreneurs, the traditional crinri- 
naf world and the bureaucracy. 

Is it posable to end this escala- 
tion of crime? More and more 
people believe that the solution 

S involve a third circle of crim- 
: a network of shady high- 
rolfing entrepreneurs, often re- 
ferred to as the Russian mafia, in 
league with corrupt officials who 
are genuinely interested in evolu- 
tion toward democracy and a free 
market economy. Although this 
group might sometimes employ 
the services of the other two, their 
goals are very different. 

Unlike members of the first 
two criminal aides, corrupt pofi- 
tidans and entrepreneurs are sot 


interested in 1 

mg of thdr country. Rather, they 
want to create an organized sys- 
tem from which they can control 
events and thus be in a strong 
position in the long ton. 

One p rin c ip le of Stalin’s bold 
on power was to replace regional 
leaders every two to three years. 
But Moscow no longer has that 
power. Regional authorities now 
understand that thdr strength fies 
in their own constituencies, and 
they depend on locaDy influential 
groups, indnduig the mafia. 

Even intdfigence and law en- 
forcement agencies find them- 
selves dependent on the coqpera- 
tionof the local mafia-connected 
eiite. Increasingly, Russia's politi- 
cal system is a democracy only 
insofar as it represents the inter- 
ests ttf this elites 

When it comes to control of 
individual companies, the come 
bosses’ methods are simpte. They 
approach the director of a hnstr 
ness and sagged a more manage- 
able and productive system mai' 


will provide everyone with certain 
guaranteed economic returns. 

For the director, noncoopera- 
tioa may mean unbearable oper- 
ating conditions, refusals of cred- 

it, delays in supply, wodarf** 
acadatis. missing payrolls — 
even death. Braking, transporta- 
tion and media organizations have 
all been infiltrated in this way. 

Many tear that one or the other 
of the various mafia factions will 


ons, a 


iKfity that is great 
‘ by the continuing 
of fire central govern- 
ment’s controL 

In f rot, they tatty already be 
dose redoing so. Last week, Ger- 
‘ national pofioe agency 
that a small amount of 
tatoainm adzed 
in M«ry near the Swiss border 
came from Russia. 

In case Boris Yeltsin's team 
cannot control tbe situation, 
which is entirely possible, the 
United States should not rule 
ont -dfrect contact with those 
who could — the corrupt politi- 
cians who have the real power 


Population: Women Will Be Taking More Control, ^ 

* ” ncctions, these pobticians could 

‘ be said to legitimately represent 
’'tteir regions and speak for the 


W ASHINGTON — “1 want to have just a 
few children — two or three. If l have 


By Perdita Huston 


tor. When I asked if she wanted 


too many I won't be able to send ray of them 
to school, and today, being educated is the 
only way out of poverty. 1 want my children 
to be belter off than I.** So spoke Ercilia 
Falco, a farm laborer’s wife, whom I met 
recently in Brazil. 

As we learn more about the Vatican’s 
denunciation of the proponents of the 
World Conference on Population and De- 
velopment, to take place in Cairo in Septem- 
ber, claiming that they impose foreign views 
of family and family planning on the world’s 
unsuspecting billions, it is enlightening to 
listen to Ercilia and her peers. 

Is it a question of cultural imperialism to 
worry about tbe millions of women who are 


denied basic human rights and dignity by the 

lack of r 


triple oppression of poverty, lack of health 
services and lack of reproductive choice? 

In the past year and a half, as I have 
listened to families in all regions of the 
world, it has been evident that there is a 
common desire for smaller family size. The 
riders tell of the burden of the laige families 
of the past and of frequent maternal mortal- 


notwiths tan ding, a culturally imperialistic 
plot. The early leaders of the family plan- 
ning movement were of diverse origin: Lady 
Rama Rau of India, Constance Goh Kok 
Kee of Singapore, Senator Shidzue Kato of 
Japan, and tne courageous Evangelina Ro- 
driguez of tbe Dominican Republic. 

They dared raise the issue of women’s 
reproductive health in public debates, to 
proclaim that safe motherhood entails hav- 
ing control over the questions of If and when 
to have a child. Their commitment raiders 
accusations of cultural imperialism absurd. 

Even the phrase “safe motherhood,” used 
in the Plan of Action for the Cairo confer- 
ence, are unacceptable to Vatican followers 
who say it implies acceptance of abortion. 

Isn’t it a shame that grown men continue 
to deny contraceptives to women in the 
name of religion, when in fact using oontra- 


dren, she began to cry. She said she 
wanted as many cfaudren 


ceptives appropriately is the best way to 
avoid the need for abortion? 


ity. The young aspire to have no more than 
-hfldren of 


three children of their own. 

This appears to be true in remote rural 
areas as well as in cities. Parents are motivat- 
ed by poverty and their personal aspirations, 
not by ideas imposed from afar. 

History also teBs us that the family plan- 
ning movement is not, Vatican assertions 


But these grown men, divorced as they are 
from the realities of women’s lives, from the 
fact that half a million women a year lose 
their lives in giving life, continue to say that 
the use of contraceptives is a sin. This con- 
demns many women to unwanted pregnan- 
cies and, yes, to the specter of abortion. 

On a recent visit to Jordan I met a young 
mother who had survived seven pregnancies 
without ever being allowed to consult a doc- 


dri£r 
^nor 

as had, that- 
they were poor, malnourished and unedu- 
cated. But, she explained, “my hnsbrad 
wants more children.” 

■ This is not an uncommon attitude. Many 
married women, like this Jordanian mother,, 
have liitie control over when ot how to have . 
sexual relations with their Husbands. They 
are simply expected, Ity custom and often 
aided by fear, to submit. 

To insist that “natural” family pbmnin&is 
the answer, as the Vatican propose^ is pre- 
posterous. If women have no controf over . 
when and whether to hove sexual relations, 
how are they “naturally” to prevent preg- 
nancy? This points again to the distance that 
remains between the Vatican and the real 
world erf women’s daily lives. 

I suspect that fear of women is one of the 
engines of Vatican policy. The heart of the 
matter is power, protecting the status quo. - 
If women were to have, more control over 
their bodies, and thus ova their lives, might 
they not challenge oppressive authority — 
those who deny them basic rights, the true 
moral imperialists? Tbe answer is 
And no matter what happens at the 
conference, they w3L 


interests of that constituents. 
The United States would be tm- 
~ wi se to' restrict its lines of com- 
ionsiCBtiOD to the Kremlin. „ 
Most Russians want continu- 
ing steps toward democracy and 


a market economy. They worry 
his powe 


The writer is preparing a book of interviews 
with diverse types of families m 12 countries 
around the world. She contributed ties comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. ■ 


Keep a 'Welcome’ Sign, and Help Teach the Rides 


p AR1S — Fretting about the 


numbers of children present 
and foreseen is awkward. Advo- 
cating empowerment for women 
is useful Past Malthusian pessi- 
mism has been discredited. Those 
three concerns tangle in today’s 
debate about world population. 
Consider them separately. 

Selective misanthropy is not 
new and wifi not go away. Fear of 
papist babies sired a generation 
of anti-birth campaigners in 
America not so many decades 
ago. Serbs want fewer non-Serbs 
in the neighborhood. Looking 
back, one can find the American 
roisode benign. Or one can think 
the ethnic cleansers of tbe bloody 
sort and of the daintily wishful 
sort to be related. The centwy has 
seen bigotry nun lethal too often. 

Tolerance is not optional. Suc- 
cessful communities are tolerant 
ones. Sirin color, in particular, has 
to be irrelevant. 

If whites really wanted to keep 
up their small representation on 
the planet, they would be haring 
more babies themselves. The im- 
polite fashion instead is to de- 
mand that non whites have fewer. 
The intention can be generous or 
it can be ugly. 

In the former case, is it wise!? 

Delight at life, commonly ex- 
pressed in the smiles that people 
show to infants and their moth- 
ers, seems healthy, one of human- 
kind’s saner ways; fear of life 
seems morbid. But pro-child sen- 
timent-at-a-distance angers wit- 
nesses of the real condition of 
children, women and men in a 
real world is which misery could 
be spared if births were averted. 

Tolerance again: the neighbors' 
procreative practice is their busi- 
ness, even if it does have social 
consequences. One cannot civilly 
deplore the life of anyone’s child. 

Dread of looming pauperiza- 


By Bob Donahue 


tion may be afoot, as if non- 
Westerners could eat and build 
and endure only in exchange for 
Western impoverishment Here is 
another old story — of bourgeoi- 
sie rad laborers, millionaires and 
ordinary people, and of the fanta- 
sy that the wealth of a Few, when 
dispersed far and wide, could do 
the many much good at afi. 

What has done good is school- 
ing, self-help rad civility, with its 
rights and duties and evolving po- 
litical institutions. How the citi- 
zens of today’s less developed 
countries might prosper in any 
other way is hard to see. 

In the West, schooling, self- 
and civility have their ups 
downs. The present moment 
is one of confoaon. We shall get 
it, buL neglected work will 
tve to be caught up with. A 
rolling up of the sleeves has be- 
gun. And awareness of the plan- 
et’s oneness keeps growing. 

Hence the concern for family 
welfare everywhere, and far wom- 
an's lot in particular. 

In family matters, too, ata time 
when Western advocacy is often 
resented as intrusive, non- West- 
erners can point to Western fail- 
ings. Men and women in the West 
do have a distance to go toward 
effectiveness together. Still* they 
have corns quite far enough to 
have earned the tight to warn 
against ignorant subservience, 
and actively to help Third World 
parents surmount it Sadr libera- 
tion affects birthrates. 

It affects tbe rates indirectly; 
lowering them is not tire direct 
object This is the j?ru dent course, 
and not only because families 
should lyianagp- theffisdves. The 
planet's innovative capacity to 
support its children is unmea- 
sured. Mai thus is still in court. 


Anyone who had Forecast a few 
generations back that the cades of 
the West would reach their pre- 
sent size in relative comfort 
would have been disbelieved. 
(Then as now, our schooling pre- 
pared us better for familiar pat- 
terns than for change.) The West- 
on countryside has emptied in 
similarly incredible proportions. 
This latter trend may be revers-. 
ibie. Certainly, one Western chal- 
lenge in the vast Third World 
today is to help make- country- 
sides hospitable. 

The United Nations 


or rather adult fecklessness. The 
right answer may be “both,” bat 
stressing one veals the other. 

More months to feed means 
more arms and brains for .work, 


a Washington conference on glob- 
al hunger last December: “As a 
proportion of the world popula- 
tion, there are fewer hungry peo- 
ple today than at any other time 
m history ." What would Malthus 
make of that? 

The words “too many people” 
are a mantra, interned as if to 
explain all manner of ills. We are 
assured, for instance, that “too 
many people” is one erase of the 
horrors of Rwanda. (We are never 
told that “too many people” is 
one cause of the prosperity of the 
Netherlands.) An explanation that 
explains nothing Mocks explana- 
tion, sometimes designedly. • . . 

. When people cause problems 
or suffer from them, there can be 
said to betoo maity people if ibe 
problem would be smaller were 
there fewer. (If America’s popular 
tion were smaller, there would be . 
fewer road deaths.) The point is 
important. Intractable pain is rou- 
tinely blamed oa overpop ulati on 

In a practical sense, it can seem, 
clear that fewer births are the . 
obvious remedy; realistically, 
nothing rise is going to wort 
Begged is* the core question of 
whether children are the proMan, 


is-tbe case that demand to depress 
birthrates is more ardent than de- 
mand to create jobs. Such is the 
Zeitgeist, and it can be deplored. 

We were once told to go forth 
and multiply. Tradition has inter- 
preted the commandment as less 
than absolute; good parents win 
try to be responsible. 

Anti-birth and pro-child ad- 
vocates ought to be able to agree 

that parents can and should 1>e 
helped to raise well the children 
they choose to have. 

International Herald Tribune. 


that to preserve his power Mr. 
Yeltsin may move away from de- 
mocracy and install a strict au- 
thoritarian regime. If . he is not 
successful in consolidating pow- 
cr, hcoooLd break with the con- 
stmxtionand turn authority over 
to the army. 

Tbit even the nrifitary leaders 
might prove unable to put firings 
back io order, and would begin to 
look for a civilian government to 
whom they could return power. 
Again tbe question would re- 
main: Who is able to control tbe 
situation, a situation that wfil un- 
donbtedty became worse? 

The fact is that in many ways 
control in Russia has already 
drifted to the new criminal net- 
work, which has replaced the Md 
Communist structure. 

After a transition, as the new 
leaders and entrepreneurs estab- 
lish themselves, they would pre- 
sumably have less and less need 
fra violent tactics and more in- 
vestment in con trolling anarchy. 

Paradoxically, this network 
could eventually stabilize society 
and redoce street crime and help 
make a place for Russia in the 
new wood order and in the iuter- 
n a tio na l business co mmu ni ty. 

Russians are used to firm con- 
trol from the top. If domination 
by a m afia bureaucracy offered a 
return to file relative order en- 


* 


many would embrace zl 
. As fra die Yeltsin government, 
it has not been able to protect me 
from criminals, nor punish them, 
nor compensate roefor my fosses. 
Should it now count on my con- 
tinued support and 




it on my can- IK. 

respect/ ™ 


Thcwnter is a visiting professor 
of history and political science at 
Tne A merican University. This, 
comment, prepared with the assis- 
tance of Timothy Scott, was con- 
tributed to The New Ynrir ThtuaL 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1394 & For Freer Trade 


NEW YORK - Tbe Herald to* 
day [July 26], discussing the tariff 
quetfion, says: “Is it not time that 
manufacturers should consider 
the advantages of Free. Trade? 
Obly Free Trade can now save 
America n agricu lt ure and coon- 
mace from miserable decadence 
arid rum. The country needs that 
the demands of the Protectionist 
be not only scotched but mortal- 
Iftfqunded.” Other papers con- 
tmne to poor sho t and shell into 
the Senate, demanding that it 
pa&tireTmiff B3L 


J*gffnanssetupinits place: The 
the Council follows the 
which Bda Ktm’s Han-. 
Syrian Red army began agains t 


South-eastern Europe for 
* grand offensive. 


1944c 


M9i 


PARIS — - The Council of Kv C 
hasseatimMsagetothi 
i^P«ge^dedaM|that the 

beuBCKrtakea till the Bc^Kon 

rfgune is overthrown and a stable 

goverameat representative of afi 


■“ ffrom our New 

Mattered German* 
nation dedared tonight [July 26} 

w>ukL be; movefi le 

gga&sr.'sr- 


Germans would 




amine* t t now Being usM 




■ i Ol . t*Cin 








jjl £j* l\S£> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


Page 5 


O P 1 N 1 O N 


Clinton’s Political Survival 
Is Now at Stake in Haiti 


By Richard Cohen 


YI7ASHINGTON — The other 

jy day Bob Dole made a joke 
about BUI Clinton. Referring to the 
number of seats the Republican Par- 
ty has to pick up to gain control of 
Congress, Mr. Dole threw out the 
number 47. “It’s not the number of 
positions President Clinton has had 
on Haiti,” the Senate Republican 
leader cracked. Jokes like that show 
that very soon Mr. Clinton will have 
no choice but to send the marines to 
Haiti to restore President Jean- Ber- 
trand Aristide. 

My bet is that General Raoul Ce- 
dras and his colleagues in the Haitian 
military are going to understand that 
they have overplayed their hand. The 
virtues of exile wfll then become 
clear. The economic boycott has 
kicked Haiti into what must be a new 
economic category — call it the 
Fourth World — and things are only 
going to get worse. The White House 
estimates that when it comes to fuel, 
the boycott is SO percent effective. 
It is going for 100 percent 

For Mr. Clinton, the stakes are 
almost as high as they are for the 
Haitian military. He cannot again 
alter course in Haiti without turn- 
ing his foreign policy into a staple 
of late-night comedic monologues. 
Already, the Clinton foreign policy 
is almost universally derided — de- 
spite how swimmingly things are 
going in the Middle East. It has 
been blamed for the decline of the 
dollar, and it exacerbates the per- 
ception that Mr. Clinton knows ev- 
erything but his own mind. 

There are good and sufficient rea- 
sons to question the use of force. 
When it comes to Haiti, one of than 
is that the United States has been 
there before — from 1915 to 1933. 
The results of that occupation woe 
not exactly stunning. The cycle of 
coups and revolts resumed, democra- 
cy never got off the ground and Haiti 
remained as poor as ever. But anoth- 
er U.S. effort may prove more suc- 
cessful. This time the aim would be to 
restore the popularly elected Father 
Aristide; arid not merely to ensure 
American interests. That distinction 
is not likely to be lost cm the Haitians. 

As for Father Aristide, he remains 
something other than the virtual 
voodoo priest his critics say he is — 
and something less than the stable 
statesman the White House would 
like. Incontestably, lie seemed to 
sanction “necklacing” (vigilantejus- 
tice via a burning tire around the 
neck) when he said: “It is beautiful 
It looks sharp. It is fashionable. It 
smells good.” Unfortunately, a vid- 
eo tape of that speech exists. It 
proves he’s guilty of horror-speak. 


The White House concedes the 
accuracy of those remarks but in- 
sists Father Aristide was merely re- 
proving judges who would not bring 
h uman rights abusers to justice. 

The administration says, more- 
over, that a vaunted CIA analysis 
of Father Aristide is replete with 
errors and misinterpretations. But 
Father Aristide is at minimum a 
religious mystic; in theological 
terms, a Catholic leftist. Still in 
two recent radio speeches to his 
homeland, he called for reconcilia- 
tion. (To have said otherwise, of 
course, would have been truly po- 
litically incorrect.) 

But the psychiatric nature of Fa- 
ther Aristide is beside the point. He 
is going home. The United States 
has staked its prestige on that out- 
come and it can really settle for 
nothing less. The Haitian junta, ap- 
parently unfamiliar with the Mon^ 
roe Doctrine, has thumbed its nose 
at the din ton administration. 

The Caribbean, above all, is sup- 
posed to be an American lake. Yet, 
when the USS Harlan County tried 
to dock in Haiti in November, it 
bad to reverse engines when a gang 
of thugs showed up at the dock. 
Teddy Roosevelt could not have 
fathomed the scene. 

In an odd way, the survival of two 
r eg imes is at stake in Haiti — the 
muitaiy junta's and Mr. Clinton's. 
The former is not worth the latter — 
and the quicker it is gone, the better. 
But the political dimensions of the 
Haiti dil emma cann ot be over- 
looked cither. Even loyal Democrats 
question Mr. Clinton's foreign poli- 
cy competence, and those qualms 
seep into the domestic arena. The 
American public may not give a 
da mn about foreign policy, but the 
various elites 5 

business) do. 
president, the judgment 
would not matter. But Mr. Clinton 
is far from wildly popular. His mar- 
gin for error is virtually nonexistent 

No better place than Haiti, then, 
for Mr. Clinton to show he means 
what he says. The United States does 
have interests there — maybe not 
vital but certainly considerable — 
and the regime is sufficiently despotic 
to justify military intervention cm hu- 

if the^OOO^jnericans living in Haiti 
were threatened, that would trigger 
an invasion.) Members of the Haitian 
junta ought to realize that they are 
standing in the most perilous position 
imaginab le: between Bill Clinton and 
his political success. If X were them, 
I would start packing 

Washington Post Writers Grmqt. 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


What Haiti Really Needs 

Regarding the report "U.S. Steps 
Up Threat to Use Force Against Hai- 
ti s Rulers ” ( July 18): 

Is Haiti a basket case? It would not 
be surprising if Heruy Kissinger 
thought so; but that Ren 6 Dumont, 
who has given most of his long life to 
helping the world's poor, should say 
as he did that Haiti is a “country with 
no hope” evokes pity and terror. 

If the United States were to be 
“stuck indefinitely with governing 
this poor nation” (see Lou Cannon's 
Opinion column of Jufy 18). who 
would benefit? Only the small class 
that for years has exploited and thus 
destroyed Haiti's once-rich re- 
sources of fisheries and farms, its 
coffee, bananas, cacao, sugar cane 
and mahogany — the class which, 
with U.S. complicity, has supported 
the Duvaliers, overthrown the Bas- 
tide government and consolidated 
its position by sponsoring the pre- 
sent triumvirate of (the State De- 
partment’s word) “brutes.” 

The restoration of ravaged forests 
and coastal waters, an end to long 
neglect of Haitians’ health and edu- 
cation, protection of human rights, 
the radical reform of an unjust eco- 
nomic system — these changes would 
allow Haiti's friends to take heart. 
But who will bring them about? 

DAVID DORRANCE 
Paris. 

Change in China 

Robert Elegant makes the alarm- 
ing assertion that “China is further 
from democracy than it was even 60 


years ago” (“To China From Germa- 
ny. a Lesson in UnrepresseJ Democ- 
racy." Opinion, July 12). But in 
1934, northeast China had just 
been occupied by Japan; ihe for- 
eign settlements in Shanghai and 
the administration of Chinese mar- 
itime tariffs remained under the 
control of foreign powers. 

I wish Mr. Elegant would recog- 
nize that China is becoming more 
open at a speed much greater than 
people usually think. 

EMILY YAO. 

Beijing. 

Soccer and Freedom 

In his July 5 article “A Game 
With a Conscience." Rob Hughes 
writes: "In 1978. Argentina used the 
World Cup and the euphoria it gen- 
erated to celebrate freedom from 
military repression. The curfew was 
lifted, and sport became the catalyst 
for liberty.” 

In 1978, while the Argentine team 
was scoring its triumphs, with the 
generals and Henry Kissinger on the 
very important bleachers, and later, 
when the populace was drunk with 
victory, people were being gassed, 
“disappeared" and tortured in se- 
cret jails. It was only four years later 
that the Argentines could celebrate 
liberty, and that not through the 
deeds of soccer players, but because 
of the British victory in the Falk- 
lands. No sir, spectator sports were 
never “a catalyst for liberty.” 

RICARDO NIREN BERG. 

Paris. 


How an 84- Year-Old Mom 
Got the Most Out of Paris 


By Susan Tiberghien 


Water With Care 

Visiting Paris recently, 1 saw spec- 
tacular floral displays everywhere. 
Houseboats and other vessels plying 
the Seine were filled with container 
plants and window boxes of ever- 
greens, flowering annuals and 
shrubs. American vessels back in the 
States should emulate this expres- 
sion of floral splendor. 

However, not everything is com- 
ing up roses. On manicured bent- 
grass lawns to the west of the Lou- 
vre, grass was severely discolored — 
not because the crew was scalping 
with the greens mower, but rather 
because of disease. Over-watering of 
poorly drained soil when air tem- 
peratures are between 75 and 95 
degrees Fahrenheit (24 to 35 degrees 
centigrade) causes pythium, a dis- 
ease also blown as cottony blight. 

The landscape crew should cut 
back substantially on morning irri- 
gation so the soil dries out. If water 
flows there, the beautiful lawn will 
be as brown as straw by this time 

next month. 

JACK EDEN, 
Garden Editor. 

The Washington Post. 
Washington. 

Testimony to Man’s Lunacy 

Regarding “ Moon Landing ? Don't 
Believe It, the Naysayers Say" (July- 
21) by Marc Fisher: 

Alas, the proof of the moon land- 
ing lies on its once pristine surface; 
a pile of trash. 

CHRISTINE S. FREMANTLE. 

London. 


G ENEVA — My mother, who is 
84, wanted to return to Paris, 
it would be a short second visit — 
two days. Mom said that was 
enough for the museums and may- 
be Montmartre. 

But we arrived on a day all the 
museums were dosed: the staff were 
on strike. So we headed for Mont- 
martre. Our hotel receptionist said 

MEANWHILE 

there was a direct subway, and the 
stop. Abbesses, was lovely. 

“There’re no muggings in Lhe sub- 
ways here?” asked Mom. 

Muggings? I said no. but double- 
checked with the receptionist. 

The weather on that spring day 
was windy, cold and wet We took 
off with one large umbrella. The 
subway was warm and clean. 

“Do" you know how deep we are?" 
Mom asked. 

I had no idea. 

“I was just wondering." 

We arrived at Abbesses and start- 
ed up the stairs toward street level. 
We climbed and climbed. A circular 
ramp went on forever. Finally we 
emerged from the underground. 
Mom called it Metro Abyss. 

But it was lovely outdoors. There 
was a little park, the trees were turn- 
ing green, the tulips were in bloom. 
The rain had stopped. Tourists were 
gathered cm the white steps leading 
up to Sacre Coeur. We took the 
funicular — the short, incline rail- 
way — and slowly Paris, sleek and 
shinin g from the rain, spread itself 
out at our feet. Mom looked for a 
r ailin g and 1 took her photo, hale 
and happy, hovering above Paris. 

We went to watch the artists at 
the village square. Mom thought an 
ice-cream cone would be fun — “but 
not if it’s over a dollar." 

1 wanted so much to say it was 
one dollar, but she unfailingly de- 
tects any attempt at slyness. 

“Susan, how much is it?" 

A bit more, 1 said. 

“How much more?” 

I said three dollars. 

She said she would wait until she 
got back to America. 

The square sparkled with color. 
More and more artists appeared, 
setting up their easeis, lining up 
their paintings. Sunlight dried the 
sidewalks. We moved slowly from 
one stand to another. 

“Do you want your portrait?" an 
artist asked, addressing Mom. 

‘Tell him he should pay me," she 
said. The artist laughed. 

“Why’d he laugh? Did he under- 
stand me?” 


“Mom. he was speaking English." 

“Well, it didn’t sound like it” 

The next day. the museums were 
open, but now the subways and bus- 
es were on strike. So off we went by 
foot io the Louvtc. Wind whi pped 
around us as we crossed the Seine. 
The I. M. Pei pyramid in the muse- 
um's counyard glowed. 

We wailed inside for tickets. 
Only the new Richelieu wing was 
open. There would be no second 
glimpse of Mona Lisa. Crowds 
were lining up behind us. We look 
the escalator to the covered court- 
yards filled with statues — gods 
and goddesses, wild animals. 

“Who are they?” asked Mom. 

“Each one?” 

“No. not all of ihem.” 

I was glad only one wing was 
open. 

By the time we got up to the 
Flemish paintings on the top floor 
and looked back down to the pyra- 
mid. a line circled the square. 

1 wondered whether to risk such a 
line at the Musee d’Orsay, across the 
Seine. Mom was game. So onward we 
went, great-grandmother and grand- 
mother, along the blustery quay. 

“Isn't this where the book stalls 
used to be?" Mom asked. 

1 was holding her arm, struggling 
with the umbrella, watching out for 
curbs and puddles. “They’re here. 
Mom, but they're sbuL It’s raining." 

Mom turned and looked at me, “1 
know it's raining.” 

The gods and goddesses were with 
us. There was no line. At the en- 
trance. I tried to keep the umbrella 
for Mom to use as a cane. But the 
guard said no. 

“Tell him 1 walked all the way 
from Virginia with it-” 

The guard said he would make an 
exchange. “Leave the umbrella and 
I’ll gel you a wheelchair." 

Mom accepted. Bells rang, doors 
opened, elevators carried us to the 
top gallery. This time she was 
queen. She would raise her hand 
and point to the painting she want- 
ed to see. The crowds would pan. 
When they didn’t make way, she 
would clear her throat. Sometimes 
she went “Beep, beep!" 

By the time we had worked our 
way’ from the Postimpressionists to 
ground level and the Preimpres- 
sionists, I thought it was about my 
turn to sit and let Mom push. She 
did not agree. 

“A grand visit.” she would tell 
everyone afterward. “When the mu- 
seums were dosed, we did the sub- 
ways, and when the subways were 
closed, we did the museums." 

International Herald Tribune. 




. . • •. • ■ ■- 
“ *5 • , • i !*•*: • . ■ 



L\ 

r 

r 


There are no easy names for. the kinds of service 
we've even pur Cardmembers over the years; Because every day, 
everywhere around the world, so many of our Service 
Representatives have. gone beyond the caB- helping to sofve 
problems not just about lost Cards dr Travelers Cheques, but 
about the unpredictable nature of life itself. So whether you're - 
upriver without a paddle dr downtown without a hotel. American 
Express. is there for you and ready to be of service. Whatever 
name you want to give it. 











- • • : ,; v •••; " • ;.v. ; r 2 -. : ... . ; l- 1- . 



*# 


S’ 


Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 199* 


2,000 U.S. Troops 
Expected to Join 
Rwanda Aid Effort 


By Steve Vogel There are also plans 10 send 

Post service more U.S. troops into the re- 

' ENTEBBE Uganda— Plans gi° n around Goma, according 
are advancing to establish a sig- to officers. 

* nificant US. military presence Major Dale Cremiso, a mem- 
in Rwanda, along with a com- ber of General Nix s suff, said. 

Tbined-natioiis headquarters in “We’vegot to Stop fee dyino- 

• Kigali, and an advance party 

- .1 J L. in ihp 


could be established in the 
; Rwandan capital within several 
• days, U.S. officers say. 

[ A “ minim um of 2,000" U.S. 
i troops may soon be put on the 

S ound in Rwanda, Brigadier 
eneral John Nix, commander 
of the U.S. Joint Task Force, 
said here Tuesday. 

The mission of the troops 
. would be to establish a network 
’ of relief in Rwanda aimed at 
encouraging the more than 1 
- milli on refugees living in horrif- 
ic conditions around Goma, 
• Za ire, to return home, accord- 
, ing to officers. 

In addition, a 


That’s the order of the day." 

The U.S. focus will be on 
providing clean water to com- 
bat the cholera epidemic, Gen- 
eral Nix said. 

“We cannot do it in small 
quantities,” he said. *^Ve have 
to be prepared to do it in large 
quantities because of the large 
number of refugees." 

General Nix said his task 
force headquarters would “tem- 
porarily, and only temporarily’ 
be at Entebbe. Kigali and 
Goma are being considered as 
options, according to officers. 
The influx of American 



Russia and Estonia 
Sign Troop Accord 
Military to l*a« ® n - 4u fr 31, 

Ending a 50- Year Occupation 

By Lee Hockstader ^‘^regarded 

• Pno Stnice ac too VOUng tO 


SI 




as too young. to 

MOSCOW — Russia agreed b?ne fi ts or as potential- 

trt withdraw its re - ... nccuoters. 


niuova/" receive ocu 

A»g- 3L dete^whathadbe- ^ ^ ^ U& .Strut. Lg* 




AUg. Jil, UCH»u*6 TTrt tv, 

come a contentious standoff wk 
tween the Slavic giant and US 

Baltic neighbor. 

The accord reached by Prest- 
dent' Boris N. Yeltsin and 
Estonian president, Lennart 
Men, means the end of more 


uritaSSips WtEfloni a-TTte 
vole was met with a harsh re- 
buke From the lower house of 
thlT Rusrian Parliament, and 
Russian newspapers accused 

Men. means the «a « ±e Uniu *d States of tgnonng 

than a half century.of nuhtaiy . ^ $ Russians living m 

presence in the Baltic by fonnCT soviet republics. ■ . ' 

cow. The Soviet ^nn>oc- MoscOW has insisted that the 

cupied the territory of Utbua Russian-spealang offi- 

nia, Latvia and Estomam WO. cere he treated as any other B- 

absorbing them mto the •SS tofeans, with full rights to rcsi- 


i A* 


Manuk Gareta/Rcwcr* 


ionic, dwwiw- The mnux U 1 nuisiiMH »■'" , 

„ _ . h-k— R^^rorters in Goma on Tuesday untoafir^ a fire truck that win be used to pump water to purification units. 

consisting of the different coun- at Entebbe G f a company of 

. - n roli^r ef- * - u - 


in aaaiaon, a — steam iue*i«*y »«*> — : workers in Goma on 

consisting of the different coun- at Entebbe of a company of Kenm wonv 

RWANDA: American Planes Land in Zaire With Aid for Cholera Fight 

lished in Kigali soon, according menl based in Vinceza, Italy. It. W-fVL *** estimated 20,000 who 

to a senior member of the U.S. soldiers will provide se- rMrimH i Fmm Pane 1 transport bad to be diverted from more Except . an days, the 


aviuwi - 

task force, who added that an 
advance party could be there 
within days. 

The U.S. troops in Rwanda 
will attempt to build “a support 
structure for reverse osmosis, a 
reverse refugee trek, the senior 
U.S. officer said. 

Establishing a combined-na- 
tions headquarters in Kigali is 
intended as “a statement to the 
refugees," almost all Hutus, 
that there will be no reprisals, as 
the new Tutsi government in 
Rwanda has promised, the offi- 
cial said. 


The soldiers will provide se- 
curity for the headquarters and 
military assessment *“ ° 
make sure t' 

movement, — 

harm comes to them, accord- 
ing to Captain Scott Damng- 
ton, the company commander. 

The remainder of the battal- 
ion is on standby, according to 
officers. 

Although the U.S. headquar- 
ters will be moved forward, the 
airport at Entebbe will be used 
as the air hub for U.S. relief 
operations for the time being. 


hers wrn proviac Ccutumed from Page 1 transport nao to oe uiv««iu ha ^T nmirned in the past few days, me gan, he made i 

SSSWS*!- opening the airfield at Goma to night oper- “K B&ta go™* .donated 

■sfBKSS HferasssKBR SHSSaSJSSSg Safes SsSSK 


transport .had to be divert fram nu,« JWh « ££ ^^STa ^'oTspe*- 

.. . that thev • 10 — Ir - U 


B LUCUl u»iv 

Union. Russia has ' 
pulled its troops out of Lithua- 
nia and has agreed to quit Lat- 
via by the end of August ^ 
“Leaving Estonia on the last 
day of August will reran that 
the last consequences of world 
War II are eliminated mfee 

Republic of Estonia, Mr. Men 
declared in a news conference 
here. Although fluent m Rns- 


Trminn.v mua 

dcncy and pension .benefits. 

Details were not immediately 
available of the compromise 
worked out in 
agreements, one on the with- 
SawaJ of Russian troops^ and 
the other on the status of the 
mflitaiy retirees. But i t ap; 
neared that Estonia had agreed 
to permit all of .them to slay, 
excepting only those who posed 
athreat to Estonia s national 

security. ' 

An Estonian government 

> ! .Airh mill akftlll- 


mrahm’of the Tutsi-led Patriotic wou ld be killed if they returned- in vj ow Estonia, withL 6 An Estonian gwy®* ‘y "r** 

p&szpssssisaii MSWSSSSK 

home, -savin* mey u —6 - Front and allow the defeated Russian troops remam there- Conference of Security and Co- 


rrom, a» umm vu d .. 

'MJhVmr neriod home, saying they have nothing to fear if 

^ , . they were not involved in the massacre of 

But the inadequacy of equipment on the ^ ^ ^ Rw andans, mostly 

S id, including trucks, caused a massive The Associated Press reported that 

up of supplies needed al ie government also announced plans to 
meats many kilometers away. Neveilhe- “V* ^ tens of thousands of Rwandans 

less, the United Nations has ao \ : autto- gJSSrfBr. The justice minister said those 
nzed the resumption of U.S. airdrops found would face firing squads, 
closer to the camps. A spokesman said those returning 

Aid workers called the first airdrop Sun- were received “cordially, openly and witlb- 
,^a wSteoltoTand resources because out incidents” by Patriotic Front soldiers. 


Patriotic rrom aau "* uvr ^ ~.7 

Rwandan Army — heavily involved in the 

massacres — to return home. 


Russian troops remain that. 
Despite the tiny number at 
stake, the negotiations between 
the two countries were closely 
watched in Washington and 
other Western capitals as a 
measure of Mr. Yeltsin’s wOl- 
to resist nationalist 


day 


The new Rwandan president, Pasteur 
Bizhnungu. urged President Mobnto Sese 

Seko of Zaire to disarm the Hutu "troops 

and militia. After a meeting in Mauritius. VnationaU* ■ 

the two men issued a i ornt statement prom- and live up to previous S ^Suratimts. wS he 

ising the troops wodd be disarmed. Commitments to withdraw. key issue” for 


elude one mauw. ~ 
Conference of Security and Co- 
operation in Europe “to guar- 
antee fair play " will review ap- 
olications 'to detexmme who 
presents sudi« threat, said the 
Estonian foreign minister, Jun 
T nttc He stressed that the com- 


Infecting Rwandans Is Resistant to Usual Drugs 


By Lawrence KL Allman 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The out- 
break of cholera among Rwan- 
dan refugees in Zaire is caused 
by a strain of bacterium that is 
highly resistant to the standard 
antibiotics used in helping to 
treat the diarrheic disease, ac- 
cording to the World Health 
Organization. 

But the strain is susceptible 
to another antibiotic, furazoli- 
done, according to tests per- 
formed in laboratories in Eu- 
rope, officials of the UN health 
agency in Geneva said. 


The news about the antibiot- 
ics is critical not only to doctors 
who are developing a treatment 
strategy for the thousands of 
cases of illness among the refu- 
gees, but also to governments 
and relief organizations that are 
shipping drugs and other medi- 
cal supplies to the refugee sites. 


tion, a federal agency in Atlan- 
ta. 


Such standard anti-cholera 
antibiotics as tetracycline and 
doxycycline are the wrong 
drags to send to the relief 
camps, said Dr. Paul A. Blake, 
an expert on the epidemiology 
of cholera at the Centers for 
Disease Control and Preven- 


Speaking after learning 
about the cholera strain’s anti- 
biotic resistance, he said several 
relief organizations had been 
sending the standard antibiot- 
ics in the belief that they were 
the needed drags. 

Die bacterium’s resistance to 
standard antibiotics, though of 
concern, is less dangerous than 
it would be in treating many 
other infections. That is be- 
cause antibiotics are a second- 
ary measure in treating cholera, 
which kills through severe de- 


hydration and subsequent col- 
lapse of the cirailatory system. 

The primary lifesaving measure 
is to give fluids and salts by 
mouth and by intravenous in- 
jection to restore the gallons of 
fluid lost in diarrhea. 


By the time antibiotics 
effect, a patient s' 
saved” by measures 
fluids. Dr. Blake said. 



as- 


But antibiotics can stop the 
excretion of cholera bacteria 
within 24 hours, whiefa has im- 
portant public health benefits. 


The antibiotic-resistant «•«- 
peel of the strain of cholera has 
been confirmed by laboratories 
at the Academic Medical Cen- 
ter in Amsterdam, the Pasteur 


& jnuiKuj w**— 

ill liiraciu ugee camps, itwffl.be 

practically impossible to stop 
the spread of cholera." 


Her organization and the 
Centers -for Disease Control 


. , . - A - t xria was' “the key issue for 

Earlier this “jj®***^ . Estonia in the talks, 
summit meeting of lradmg m- f the military 

touid MOons in My, Mr. ^^rould be respected 
Yeltsin gave a flat “no ESlYto the rights of Estonian 

asked if the hoops i would Teave Yeltsin was 

«=., — - *»u. *n d of Aobbsl ^ saying after the talks 

bytbe Itar-Tass press agency-. 

non or niunm*. »»»» >“ . — Adniri if he agreed with Mr. 

“Quite 

living in the republic. w jm guarantee to all 

He was referring to the Estonia 

the status of Estonia is the economic sue- 

■«* **T « *be forreer 5o«« 

■ .i * • : > _ . l-Yi— 


c nw»ai v*u' have sent teams of epidemido- --- -r— ^ fh _ _jrfn to cess story in me iww* wy" 
am, the Pastoxr ^ to Rwanda, Uganda. and who haye giracd the republics. Its showcase capital, 

institute in Paris and the Zaire to determine how much of ISu^n^ioos is crinkled with new 

French military, accorumg to the diarrheic illness that is ltiD- restaurants and caf-s 

- - • a World nMnif. tbm>> ie Hue ta dml- from Russia there- aome at it- a /femictlv West 


And they can 

by cutting down on 

of fluid lost in diarrhea and by 
shortening the duration of the 
Alness. 


that give it a distinctly West 




HEARINGS 


Contmuedfrom P^el 

meetings were ethically appropriate — is 
also about the form of government more 
than the function, and for now that is what 
Mr. Gonzalez’s committee is debating. 

The hearings, to be continued Thursday, 
are largely about bureaucratic etiquette: a 
discourse on when it is proper for one 
agency to speak to another about a possi- 
ble criminal investigation. 

In this case. Treasury and White House 
officials met several times and had a num- 
ber of conversations about the Whitewater 
inquiry, in which Mr. Clinton and his wife, 

TT"ii iuu»«% ftAtvuvl oc ^tvttxihlp. hen- 


The political jockeying has been going 
on for months, with rancorous debate over 
" counsel Lloyd J. Cut- the content of the hearings, the witness 

KSWianG White and greund rate te q u«dorant 
House’s attitude toward the da/s proceed- The White House submitted reams of 

ings in his opening comments. paper to the committee with the under- 

Thoufih agreeing that the series of con- - standing that some of it would be treated 
whH*. House and Treasury * — aii «r th*> mtws 


ble fraud at Madison and the savings anti 
loan’s connections to the Clintons. 

The White House counsel, Lloyd J. ptt- 
* - — .i.Wn,^l hie divl the White 


f UUU&U • 

tacts between White House and Treasury 
staff didn’t look good and were toaexten- 
sive for his tastes, Mr. Cutler contended. 


cianimra .iiMU miua- ^ 

as clarif ied materials. All of the papers 
were kept under guard, and with great 
fanfare, members promised that any press 


hLVC lUi 1AW j 

“These contacts had no impact on tne real 
world.” 


larnare, mauuco ujuuiw^u “ 

leaks would be fully investigated. 


“Nothing happened,” Mr. Cutler raid. 
Later, the longtime Washington inader 
—a«.j 4t affair fltfl W 1 nr 7. on 


As the hearing approached, the confi- 
, Stoner and Mr. 


. ..- _. r Jg appr 
den rial diaries of Mr. jiuhvi am. 

inquiry, in which Mr. Clinton and his wile. Later, u» ^jongume Altman began leaking to the press, as such 

Hillary, had been named as “possible ben- rated the Whitewater affair as a^l or 2 on always do. Republicans theo- 

eficianes” of bank fraud at an savings and the Washington scandal meter, witn iu r ^ zc< j ^ White House was leaking 

t — g,< f/irmm nartner in die reserved for Watergate. - ■ selected do cumen ts itself and planning to 

saoifice Mr. Allman to deflect blame for 
the contacts from the Clintons. 

Meanwhile, Democrats and Republi- 
cans boned their strategies. 


me WaSiURKlUU aMUiuu 

UlWlOlkUl Ul WM»«— — H j f lir .ln.nr.tr 

loan owned by their former partner in fee rcservedfor 

Whitewater Development Corp n James ” 


VWl XVII TV 

James B. But that did not stop the eyes of the 
McDouaal ‘ world from watching. CNN gave exhaiis- 

Con^Ss is still waiting for approval tive coverage to the hearings, and crowds 
from feeWhitewater special counselRob- of reporters ^ PtiL 
ert B. Fiske Jr., before delving into possi- nal junkies hung onto every wora 


PEACE: Behind Joint Pledge by Rabin and Hussein, Goals That Differ 


Continued from Page I 

resources and technology, tourists and 
electric power. . 

In effect, King Hussein abandoned any 
interest he may nave had in trying to re- 
capture the West Bank and East Je™sa- 
1cm, which Jordan occupied from 1948 
until the 1967 war. The land is now the 
object of Palestinian aspirations. 

While promising never to surrender Je- 
rusalem, Mr. Rabin agreed last year to give 
the Palestine Liberation Organization ad- 
ministrative control over the West Bank 
and Gaza. 


Agence France-Presse reported from Je- 
rusalem: ■ 

The leader of the PLO, Yasser Arafat, 
lobbied Arab leaders Tuesday to support 
the Palestinian claim, to Jerusalem after . 
Israel recognized Monday that Jordan had 

. ...k. S— iVc hnlu mtu A /liaWlW 


as take in the holy rity.'A dispute broke 
’ ■* • PLO, with Jor- 


out between Israd and the PI 

dan sitting on the sidelines, over Mr. Ra- 
bin's action. 

Mr. Arafat telephoned King Hassan II 
of Morocco, Foreign Minister Amr 
Moussa of Egypt and Prince Sultan ibh 
Abduiaziz. Saudi Arabia's defense minis- 


ter, a Palestinian official said. Nabil Abu 
Rodedna, Mr. Arafat's press counselor, 
also warned against attempts to break 
Arab ranks and to undermine Jordanian- 
Palestinian relations. . 

In the Washington declaration, Israel 
agreed “to accord^ high priority to Jordan's t 
historic role” regarding Muslim holy sites V : 
in East Jerusalem. 

Mr. Arafat initially welcomed the decla- 
ration. . But the Palestinian authority's 
news agency, WAFA, later put out a state- 
ment in Gaza denouncing the recognition 
on Jordanian rights in the holy city. 


Ml HE A ST: Jordan and Israel Recognize an Inevitable Reconciliation 


CocniiHied from Page 1. 
the mam currency in the West Bank and 
Gaza Strip, fall as Palestinian autonomy 
took hold, and he saw the uncertainty that 
the decline had engendered regarding Jor- 
dan’s economic future there. He saw the 
Agency for International Development 
break ground for a $12-miIlion housing 
project for Palestinians living in Gaza. 

When Mr. Clinton told the king during a 
meeting at the White- House last month 
that he would press Congress to forgive 
Jordan’s $700-million debt with the Unit-- 


ed States if he took a bold step toward 
peace, it was just the nudge the king need- 
ed. ! 

The event Monday also symbohzed 
King Hussein’s redemption in fee eyes of 
Washington- This was fee man who tacitly 
supported Saddam Hussein after the Iraqi 
leader invaded Kuwait, calling him “an 
Arab patriot." The king opporad fee de- 
ployment of U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia 
and enraged President George Bush, who 
told . intimates he felt betrayed by a 
“friend” whose signed photos hung in the 


residential quarters of the White House. 

The (mly key player still awaiting re- 
demption is President Assad. He cannot be 
happy that King Hussein, like Mr. Arafat 
last September, was welcomed al the 
White House while Syria is subject to eco- 
nomic sanctions and remains on the State 
Department’s list of nations supporting 
terrorism. 

'Thus, -fee “new landscape” in the Mid- 
dle East that Secretary ofState WanenM. 
Christopher talks about so glowingly still 
has vast areas of rough terrain. 


SEX: Phone Pom m Moldova Is Expensive Wrong Number for U.S. Parents 


Continued from Page 1 
about the international calls. 
But she said: “Because the in- 


“^.fisSSJSSK 


outside the - 

are some questions about our 
jurisdictional ability to go after 
them.” 


If customers requestit, phone 
a block access to 


companies can «««•». — — - — 
international Unra, just as they 
do for domestic 900 lwes, wh»ch 

also incur a charge when dialed. 

But such actions usually ernne 
after fee initial, slwckmg bilL 
31 “You are liable; for your 
. tv u Grind- 


Probably ihe best beer in the world 


for AT&T Consumer Commu- 
nications Services: “Just like; 
your calling card. If you give it 
to someone and .they use it, 
that’s it. Just because your son 
made a call you didn’t agree 
with, it doesn’t take you off the 
hook.” 

But he hurried on to say, 
“AT&T is a caring company,, 
and we do care about our cus- 
tomers, so we take an individual 
look at each case.” 

In the individual case of fee 
twins, AT&T took the charges 
off fee bill — this time. Bob and 
his wife, Barbara, will not be so 
forgiving. The boys, they say. 


will have to- work off the now- 
erased debt to Learn just how 
much $250 is. 

Then will come fee talk about 
pornography, a conversation 
that Barbara had hoped could 
wait another four years. 

“Heveh-years>Iqs still look 
like little boys,” fee said. “They 
have .fee developing bodies, of 
young teenagers, but they stffl 
cry. And to hear tins -totally 
obscene, totally ridiculous, gro- 
tesque caricature of Hustler- 
type pornography!” 

. - “My reaction is this signifi- 
cant sense of sadness. Some- 
how. all the extra difficulty we 


have gone through — appropri- 
ately — as parents tofeudd the 
kids from this until they're at an 
age to either comprehend it or 
. make some judgment . . . YoW 
think, *Oh; my God! It just isn't"’ 
possible to protect them! 7 ” 


Reuters 

DUBAI -— The United Arab 
Emirates signed a military pact 
with the United States this 
week, a ccording to fee official 
Emirates news agency WAM 
The report gave no details on 
the pact or where it was signed: 






:a 

-*■*-* . 


-'Kir 






*5 


- ** 


ESTER-NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


Page 7 


As Go theLigurian Boatyards, So Goes the Italian Ship of State 


By John Taghabuc 

Nov York Times Service 

LAVAGNA, Italy — There are some peo- 
ple around this town of provincial puipose- 
bilness, sparkling marinas and bustling boa- 
tyards who believe there is some link between, 
the state of Italian yachting and that of the 
nation’s souL 

Maybe ii is because the country’s postwar 
economic rise wait hand in hand with a 
boom in the building of big; sleek boats, as 
the hobby of monarchs and tycoons slid 
down to the class. 

Maybe, too, it is because a major public 
tragedy played out in Italy last year seemed 
so inextricably intertwined with yachting. ' 

After all, was not the daring — though 
ultimately unsuccessful — effort of Raul 
Gardini’s yacht, II Moro di Venezia, to seize 
the America's Cup for Italy a metaphor for 
the kind of extravagances that ultimately 
bankrupted the big Montedison corporation 
of Mr. Gaxdini and led to his suicide, which 


became an emblem of the corporate and 
political scandals that have racked the na- 
tional spirit in recent years? 

As the country and its leaders fell into 
introspection, the Mercedes-Benz with the 
Milan license plate became a less frequent 
sight. Yachts of the 1980s prosperity took 
cover in safe havens up and down the Liguri- 
an coast, a stretch of sinuous bays and inlets 
that is to Italian yachting what Milan's Via 
Mont enapol eon e is to shopping. 

At. the Sangermani yards here, which Ital- 
ian newspapers like to call the Ferrari of 
Italian boating, Cesare Sangermani Jr. says 
he understands why the yachts went under 
cover. 

“Yachts were looked upon as the greatest 
of. luxury goods," Mr. Sangermani said, 
blaming one of the periodic binges of wealth- 
baiting for the industry’s most recent m alais e 
’They saw someone out in a boat, they said. 
That guy’s rich.’ The next day the fiscal 
police showed up at his door, and of course 


everyone's got some skeleton in the closet. 
They destroyed the desire of people to saiL" 
These were unpleasant times, but ultimate- 
ly there were elections and the installation of 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, a fabulous- 
ly successful businessman and ardent boats- 
man Yachting is back in fashion. 

Recently, half the cabinet and many of the 
leaders of Parham ent — such as Defense 
Minister Cesare Previti aboard his two-mast- 
ed Barbarossa, and the speaker of the Senate, 
Carlo Scognamiglio, sailing Resolute Solo- 
mon — entered a regatta at Porto fino. Their 
appearance served to reassure Italians that 
gradually things are returning to normal. 

Now Mr. Sangermani feels a fresher, stiffer 
breeze blowing. He finds encouragement in 
the government of yachtsmen, whose nautical 
images capture the new spirit. Luciano Mer- 
igliano, a legislator allied to Mr. Berlusconi, 
compared Italy recently in a Rome newspa- 
per to an abandoned galleon. 

“We’ve all got to give a hand to right her,” 


said Mr. Merigtiano, an impassioned boats- 
man from youth, in a a kind of pep talk to the 
crew. Then we can think about changes at 
the helm, to the sails, and the rest." 

For Mario Giusfredi. president of the Na- 
tional Association of Shipyards, Nautical and 
Related Industries, what belter place to start 
than the yacht yards? 

“Three years of unin term p ted crisis have 
driven the sector into the ground.” Mr. Gius- 
fredi said. 

A recent government decree, he said, elimi- 
nated the 39 percent luxury tax on some 
yachts and sailboats. He said more was need- 
ed to rerive an industry that was so much a 
marker of the national spirit. 

Mr. Sangermani's yard, which builds three 
or four yachts a year, launched only one boat 
in all 1993, focusing instead on refurbishing. 

Some of the boatyards, however, are not 
taking a chance that revival of the Italian 
market alone will sustain them. One of these 
is Antonio Ruggieri, down the coast at the 


Valdettaro Shipyard, on the edge of Porto- 
venere. 

“We operate exclusively in the internation- 
al market.” he said, guiding a visitor across a 
shipyard that has its own helicopter pad. 

When Princess Caroline of Monaco over- 
hauled her motor yacht. Pacha III, built in 
1936 for the Renault family of France, she 
flew here regularly to inspect progress. 

So did the Sultan of Oman, when his little 
navy's “training” vessel, the sleek three-mast- 
ed Shabab Oman, was in dry dock. 

Later this month, the prime minister of St. 
Vincent and the Grenadines, the Caribbean 
island ebain. will stop by to pick up twin 
sloops at 55 million each, designed for charter 
cruises and so computerized, Mr. Ruggieri 
said, “They practically sail themselves.” 

Valdettaro is building three yachting ba- 
sins in the Caribbean and Mexico with hotels, 
golf courses, berths and repair yards. In a 
sense, Mr. Ruggieri said, “We’re creating our 
own future customers.” 


Researcher Sees 
Population Boom 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The 
population of the world could 
soar by 3 billion people — from 
6 billion to 9 billion — in 31 
years, a population report said. 

The Population Reference 
Bureau, which keeps track of 
population growth, said the 
new estimate by an Austrian 
scientist, Wolfgang Lutz, is 
about 500 million people more 
than projected earlier by the 
World Bank and the United 
Nations for the year 2025. 

Mr. Lutz's research predicts 
higher fertility in Africa and 
other developing nations than 
did the World Bank and United 
Nations, which partly accounts 
for his higher prediction, said 
the Population Reference Bu- 
reau, a private organization. 


ITALY: Berlusconi’s Grasp on Power Grows Shakier 


QmtiaatA from Page 1 

Plain vest executives, Mr. Ber- 
lusconi compounded his prob- 
lems by convening a meeting at 
his villa on the outskirts of Mi- 
. Ian. Present at the meeting were 
two top government officials, 
’ the chairman of Fminvest, plus 
• the defease attorneys for his 
brother and for Salvatore Srias- 
. da, the Fminvest tax director 
accused of paying bribes. 

By Monday, Mr. Sciasda, 
under questioning by Antonio 
Di Pietro, die chief investigat- 
ing magistrate in Milan, had 
confessed to paying bribes on 
behalf of Fminvest. Mr. Sdas- 
da was also quoted in the Ital- 
ian press on Tuesday as saying 
that Paolo Berlusconi, the 
. prime minis ter’s brother, had 
- given him the money to pay off 
the Guardia di Finanza. 

On Tuesday, the Milan 
'judges issued six more arrest 
warrants for other Italian busi- 
nessmen and police officials. 


Judge Delays Decision 
On Grad Arrest Order 

Racers 

ROME — Judge Adele 
. Rando has delayed until 
Wednesday her decision on 
whether to issue an internation- 
al warrant for the arrest of Bet- 
lino Craxi, a former prime min- 
ister, judicial sources said 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Craxi, a defendant in 
three trials and the subject of 
more than 20 corr up t i on inves- 
tigations, has been at his home 
in Hammamet, Tunisia, for sev- 
eral months. 


Although details of the Sun- 
day meeting have not been 
made public, the presence of 
Cesare Previti — who was Mr. 
Berlusconi’s personal lawyer 
before he was named defense 
minister and who is no minally 
head of the country's carabinie- 
ri paramilitaiy forces — added 
to the appearance of a conflict- 
of-interest. 

Mr. Berlusconi, haring al- 
ready experienced a backlash 
against his emergency decree, 
should have realized that bring- 
ing government officials and Ins 
company executives together at 
his home would raise eyebrows. 
His aides say that this thought 
never occurred to him, which 
means thatfor some reason Mr. 
Berlusconi's political instincts 
simply faded him. The result is 
likely to be more turmoil inside 
Msgoveming coalition. 

The investigation of Mr. Ber- 
lusconi's company is having fi- 
nancial repercussions as well 
Italian share prices plunged on 
Ttiesday, with the Mfotel Index 
of leading stocks falling 301 
points, or 2.61 percent, to dose 
at 1 1,245. On Tuesday, in New 
York trading, the Italian cur- 
rency came under pressure and 
broke below the psychological 
barrier of 1,000 lire per Deut- 
sche mark. It dosed at 1,000 SO 
DM. 

Harry Richter, chai rman of 
two Italian subsidiaries of RTZ, 
the British mining conglomer- 
ate, and former president of the 
British Chamber of Commerce 
in Milan, said in an interview 
that the corruption controversy 
had resulted in “a strong note of 
disappointment” about Mr.. 
Berlusconi among business 
Jeadeas. 


“In a matter of a few days,” 
Mr. Richter said, “Berlusconi 
has managed to undo his politi- 
cal image, put under extreme 
strain the precarious balance of 
his coalition and alienate a 
good part of support within his 
own party. At this point I would 
not bet on his government sur- 
viving beyond the end of the 
year. 

In Rome, a prominent cabi- 
net minister, who asked not to 
be named, expressed astonish- 
ment at Mr. Berlusconi's self- 
made crisis, saying: T can’t be- 
lieve the way he is behaving 
myself. He should just perform 
the functions of prime minister, 
and not even involve himse lf in 
a discussion of any kind with 
Fminvest executives, let alone 
with lawyers defending Finin- 
vest executives who have admit- 
ledpaying bribes.” 

Ghihano Ferrara, the govern- 
ment spokesman, admitted in 
an interview Tuesday that the 
meeting Mr. Berlusconi held on 
Sunday was a mistake. He de- 
scribed the prime minis ter as 
“too ingenuous” and said it was 
recommended that “be must 
create a blind trust quickly or 
he will not be fulfilling his elec- 
tion promises.” 

The problem, Mr. Ferrara 
contended, was that Mr. Berlus- 
coni “always ran his company 
like a patriarch, without even 
b ringin g it to the stock market.” 

“Now he has to run the gov- 
ernment, and he has to leant,” 
Mr. Ferrara added. 

Events of the past few days 
will undoubtedly spur move- 
ment in Parliament to push 
through new antitrust legisla- 
tion. Discussion is set to start 
tins week, l ■ 


BOSNIA: 

Sarajevo Siege 

Continued from Page I 
short of war. Such an element of 
the Serbs' behavior was tacitly 
acknowledged by UN officials 
who advised the UN secretary- 
general, Butros Butros Ghali, 
this week to seek a withdrawal 
of the United Nations' 36,000- 
strong protection force from 
what used to be Yugoslavia. 

While UN officials in Saraje- 
vo said they did not think Mr. 
Butros Ghali’s announcement 
directly prompted the Serbs to 
cut the roads, it does contribute 
to a general atmosphere of in- 
ternational weakness on Bosnia 
that can only embolden the 
Serbs. 

The effect on Sarajevo and its 
300,000 people of the Serbian 
announcement win be swift. 
Since the roads opened, food 
and fuel prices have plummeted 
after two years of scarcity under 
a bloody siege. 

■ Russian Opposes PnDout 

Defense Minister Pavel Gra- 
chev of Russia said Tuesday 
only UN forces could act as 
peacekeepers in Bosnia and re- 
jected a suggestion by Mr. Bu- 
tros Ghali that they be with- 
drawn, Reuters reported from 
Belgrade. 

Mr. Grachev told reporters 
he did not consider NATO a 
suitable replacement for the 
UN forces in former Yugosla- 
via because, he said, it is not a 
peacekeeping organization. 


BOOKS 


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Busimss Massage Canter 

every Wednesday 


HOUSE OF SPLENDID 
ISOLATION 

By Edna O’Brien. 232 pages. 
S21. Farrar, Straus <£ Giroux. 

Reviewed by 
Margo Jefferson 

H OW tired Edna O'Brien 
must get of being com- 
pared to James Joyce's Molly 
Bloom because she ’is Irish and 
lusty, and to Colette because 
she is lusty and literate. 

She is at a stage in her career 
when she could canonize past 
glories, as some of her contem- 
poraries do. She could write 
novels about lusty, literate Irish 
women writers for instance. In- 
stead. she is trying new things: 
looking at parts of life she has 
been inclined to pass by, and 
taking her lavish style apart to 
work with blunter, harsher 
tools. 

Her fiction has been mostly 
about what women and men do 
to each other in the name of 
love. Her new novel “House of 
Splendid Isolation,” places 
these casualties on a broader 
landscape, amid war casualties. 

The setting is a once- grand 
manor house in the south of 
Ireland. Il is owned by Josie, an 
elderly widow just back from a 
nursing home. She is anxious, 
needy and much too chatty with 
the local nurse, who visits duti- 
fully but remembers the time 
when Josie was much too grand 
for her, and was said to be 
shaming herself and her hus- 
band by carrying on with the 
local priest. 

One night the house is taken 
over by an IRA gunman named 


McGreevy. who is wanted in 
the North for terrorist activities 
and in need of a place where he 
can hide and plan his next ac- 
tions. 

There are supporting charac- 
ters, too, from the present and 
the past: innocent bystanders, 
staunch IRA supporters and 
wary informers. 

There is Rory, the Irish police 
constable who leads the hum 
for McGreevy, and there is 
James, Josie's husband, who in- 
flicted drunken punishments on 
her until the day she devised a 
retaliation that left her a widow 
and made him a martyr to the 
Irish cause. 

The prose O’Brien is best 
known for, all lilt and sway and 
chant, is on display whenever 
Josie thinks back on her life. 
But a more curt, brusque style 
marks the world of the IRA and 
the Home Guard. 

At first it seems that the two 
styles are cohabiting, not com- 
bining. Then, bit by bit, they 
overlap and merge. You see it in 
the way Josie’s mother de- 
scribes her labor pains, how Jo- 
sie took “a day and a night to 
get out, bucking around inside 
her, the head like an iron ball, 
coming out, going back in 
again, a stubborn, hemorrhag- 
ing head.” 

Some scenes keep the hook 
hurtling past the occasional al- 
legorica 1 excesses, and past the 
moments when O'Brien falls 
under the spell of her own 
voice. She has always written 
about the horror and hypnotic 
force of violence, and about our 
need to sheathe it in words like 
love and justice. But tOI now. 


romantic love has been her sub- 
ject, not social justice. 

George Bernard Shaw called 
political hatred the only hatred 
that civilization allows to be 
mortal haired. But Willa Cather 
wrote about the hatred that 
springs from love and shrivels 
to “a complaint breathed by a 
dying woman in the stillness of 


night, like a confession of the 
soul: ‘Why must I die like this, 
alone, with my mortal enemy?” 

O'Brien has pitebed her 
house of splendid isolation in 
both these deadly camps. 


Margo Jefferson is on the staff 
of The New York Times. 


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STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


International Herald Tribune ' 
Wednesday ; July 27, 1994 
Page 9 


At Last, a Feisty New ‘Saint Joan’ 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Few theatergoers be- 
tween ihe wars ever spoke of 
Shaw’s “Saint Joan” without 
meaning Sybil Thorndike,' and 
our generation has always had : the 1964. 
Joan Plowright revival, which moved from 
Chichester to open Olivier’s National, as a 
stmilar benchmark. Thirty years on, at the 
Strand we at last have a serious new chal- 
lenge, and it comes from not one but two 
women; the actress Imogen Stubbs and the 
Australian director Gale Edwards. 

Together they give us a feisty new Joan: 
she seems to come from Northumberland, 
she combines Plowright’s earthy vigor with 
what was by all accounts the religions 
radiance of Thorndike on hearing her bells 
and her voices. But above all the produc- 
tion holds the line between the messianic 
virtues of the title character in full flood 
and the acres of religious and political 
debate with which Shaw has surrounded 
her. 

Some tight trimming of the text also 
gives us two Joans: the warrior of the rim 
half, sword held high as she raises the siege 
of Origans and changes the wind in that 
still breath takingly poetic riverside mir- 
acle, and the shora-haired martyr of the 
second half, choosing death at the stake 
over lifelong imprisonment and then living 
on through the Epilogue to have the last, 
bitter laugh as her reluctant-convert de- 
fenders beg her not to return to them. 

This production is a sharp lesson to both 


the National and the Royal Shakespeare 
Company: the commercial theater on tour 
can still handle the major with 

energy and drive and purpose and a host of 
superb character-actors, led as they are 
here on Feta - Davison’s stunning sets by 
Peter Jeffrey as the cynical Inquisitor, Jas- 
per Britton as a crippled Dauphin and Ken 
-Bones as a world-weary Warwick. In a hot 
London summer, this is an of cool 
reconsideration and classic theatricality. 

Time has not been land to W illiam Gib- 
. son’s “The Miracle Worker” (at the Come- 
dy). Chiefly remembered from the late 
1950s for stunning title-role performances 


LONDON THEATER 


from Anne Bancroft and Anna Massey, it 
' tells the story of Annie Sullivan who in late 
19th-century America taught the blind and 
deaf Helen Keller to speak and to relate. 

In its way, the play paved the way for 
“Whose Life Is It Anyway?” and “Chil- 
dren of a Lesser God” and all the other 
dramas in which the (in some way) dis- 
abled are forced into power games with, 
their healers so that roles of patient and 
protector get reversed and reconsidered. 
But this one only creaks along, and Rich- 
ard Oliver’s production is hopelessly ham- 
strung by the fact that Jenny Seagrove, a 
charming and elegant player of fight ro- 
mantic comedy, can never even get to the 
foothills of the dramatic heights required 
for Annie. 

"The Miracle Worker” also suffers, like 
all "breakthrough” dr ama, from the fact 


that its breakthroughs have been overtak- 
en and then overtaken again. 

Both Annie Sullivan and Helen Keller 
lived to tell their tales until well into the 
middle of this century. Nowadays they 
would be all over television explaining how 
it was done, but in trying to cobble a play 
together around them for earlier times and 
tastes, Gibson had to fall back on a Vic- 
torian family pattern of the overbearing 
father and die neglected sibling and al- 
though Catherine Holman is alternately 
touching and terrifying as Keller, it's like 
watching a very old black-and-white movie 
on TV. 

Having written and sometimes narrated 
musical-anthology tributes myself, I am 
not in a strong position to complain about 
“Palsy Offne” at the Whi tehall even if the 
show is just awfuL Always beware enter- 
tainments in which the casi c hat s to yon 
before the curtain goes up: it usually 
means they want you on their side when 
the disaster happens, and in this case the 
problem is Patsy herself. She sang a lot, 
dressed in a blue cowboy suit, and then 
sadly she died in a small-plane crash on 
March 5, 1963, when she was 33. 

The producers thus give us, by way of an 
opener, the sound of a small plane's engine 
suddenly cutting out. But that's about it 
for drama or plot development, and the 
rest is 30 songs, from ‘*Blue Moon of 
Kentucky” to the revivalist “I Saw the 
Light.” True, Cline also had a somewhat 
ineffectual husband, but were she alive 
today I have a terrible feeling she’d be on 
early-morning television in Kentucky de- 
manding dollars for Jesus. 





Ivan Kina 


Warrior and martyr Imogen Stubbs as Saint Joan, with Philip Quast. 


A Stark Look at Modern India 


By Alexandra Viets 


B OMBAY — The images used to 
express the condition of women 
by one of India’s playwrights 
are startling and vivid: the- 
dwarfed and stunted boughs of a bonsai 
tree, a young bride locked in her room 
for 30 years, a Siamese twin forced to 
sacrifice a limb for her brother, a spastic 
child from an unhappy and destructive 
marriage. Perhaps most startfing of all is 
that this strong feminis t voice belongs to 
a man. 

Mahesh Dattani at 35 is considered 
me of India’s best and most serious 
contemporary playwrights writing in 
En glish, This month a collection of his 
plays, called "Final Solutions and Other 
Plays,” is being published by East West 
Press. Its publication accompanies other 
recent successes: a c ommis sion by In- 
dia’s new Zee TV for a serial of his first 
and only comedy, "Where There’s a 
W£U,” an upcoming London production 
of what Dattani calls his “ugliest play,” 
entitled “Bravely Fought the Queen,” 
and plans for .the Bombay production of •- 
“Final Solutions?” — a play on commu- 
nalism and racial prejudice: 


In spite of all his achievements, Dat- 
lani sml cannot afford to be a fulltime 
writer. By day he manages an herbal 
cosmetics company, writing his plays at 
night. After growing up in a seemingly 
benign middle-class environment in 
Bangalore, in sooth India, Dattani's 
plays are strongly influenced by the op- 
pressive restrictions he saw being placed 
upon his two sisters and his mother. 
When describing his asters’ interactions 
with their peers, Dattani talks about de- 
veloping what be calls “a sympathetic 
view of the devious ways in which op- 
pressed women come to nurture their 
intelligence.” Dattani is quick to add, “It 
is a Western misnomer that mtdfigence 
doesn’t surface under oppression. It is an 
intelligence of survival.” 


Dattani, who describes Indian men as 
“very shallow subjects who all too easily 
give in to the roles prescribed to than,” 
readily admits that be finds women more 
interesting. "There are more layers to 
peel, artistically speaking.” 

“Bravely Fought the Queen,” Dat- 
tani's fourth play, is a rather disturbing 
picture of the relations between men and 
women in a wealthy isolated suburb of 
Bangalore: The 'play traces the fives of 
two sisters mamed to two brothers, liv- 
ing side by side in identical bungalows. 
The play was partly inspired by Dal- 
lam's observation, while visiting the 
home of a Gujarati family, that the wom- 
en of the house were always dressed up 
hut had nowhere to go. Using the meta- 
phor of a bonsai tree to express the 
condition of women in India, Dattani 
physicalizes the pain of his characters 
with striking symbolism. l-athina, a 
young woman drawn to making bonsai 
trees without really knowing why, ex- 
plains: “You stunt their growth. You 
keep trimming at char roots, yea make 
sure the roots don't have enough space 
and then you bind their branches with 
wire.” 

I N “Tara,” written in 1990, Dattani 
comes up with another powerful 
metaphor for female oppression 
when male and female Siamese 
twins are physically separated by sur- 
gery. The twins’ mother opts to take a 
Hmb and vital organ from the daughter 
in order to ensure the strength and physi- 
cal perfection of the son. As a result, 
Tara gradually wastes away while her 
brother thrives. The play was a box- 
office success in Bombay, Calcutta and 
New Delhi. 

Dattani, whose gentle easygoing man- 
ner and boyish charm seem incongruous 
with the hard social realities of his plays, 
was originally a dancer of bharma ha- 
tayam, a traditional dance of south In- 
dia. Dattani, who had always been inter- 
ested in acting, fell into playwrigbting 


"by accident and because of a dearth of 
good scripts.” He decided to try writing a 
one-act play just for fun. When he sub- 
mitted me play to local competition, he 
painfully recalls how “every single critic 
took the time to tear it apart” 

Many of Dattani’s admirers claim the 
key to his success is that he uses the 


family unit as the starting-point for all of 
his plays. Alyque Padamsee. founder of 
Bombay's Theatre Group, who has di- 
rected two of Dattani’s plays, says, “In 
India, in one way we’re still old-fash- 
ioned, we still live within the extended 
family, and need to know how things 
affect one another.” Padamsee recalls 
audience members praising “Tara” as a 
play that concerns “all families 

Padams ee views Dattani as being one 
of the agents of change in India today. 
“Unlike so many of his contemporaries, 
Dattani is not writing plays that revive 
old myths and legends. He is one of the 
few, really the only playwright in English 
today who writes about modem India 
and who uses the theater as a forum for 
airing social and political issues.” _ 

Ironically, despite the social relevance 
Of Dattani’s themes, Indian-English the- 
ater is still considered a theater of the 
elite, using a language that is used by 
only 10 to 12 percent of Indians. Unlike 
the scores of successful novels written in 
English by Indian authors, playwright- 
ing is held to a different standard. People 
speak of Indian-English theater as self- 
conscious and unnatur al. Indian intellec- 
tuals whose mother tongue is English 
often a dmit to preferring regional lan- 
guage theater, over an English language 
play. Dattani dismisses this as snobbism. 
“En glis h is another Indian language. To 
most people English theater means Eng- 
lish plays and English accents. If they 
hear Indian-English it just doesn’t ring 
true and they’re disappointed.” 

Alexandra Viets is a writer based in 
India. 


Big Screen: The $4 Million Script 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Tuna Service 


L OS ANGELES — Over the week- 
end, producers, agents and studio 
executives temporarily forgot 
about the O. J. Simpson case. All 
the talk about management turmoil at the 
Walt Disney Co. was placed on hold. 

What riveted Hollywood was the re- 
cord-breaking sale on Thursday night of a 
movie script tor $4 milli on by Internation- 
al Creative Management, a top talent 
agency. 

The good news is that the script, “The 
Long Kiss Goodnight,” by Shane Black, is 
one of those rare screenplays written for a 
wo man The not-so-gpod news is that ibe 
wo man, a former assassin for a govern- 
ment splinter group, kills with her bare 
hands. She uses plenty of other weapons, 
too, producing corpses every three or four 
pages of the script. 

To executives here, the remarkable price 
of Black’s script has far less to do with the 
quality of the screenplay, a slick, compel- 
ling. blood-splattered page-turner. 

What drove the sale, said executives, 
were factois that reveal a great deal about 
the odd way studios toss around huge sums 
of money while professing to keep costs 
low. 

The factois include the increasingly in- 
tense competition for a script by a success- 
ful action writer like Black, who wrote 
“Lethal Weapon.” Another factor is the 
hunger of an upstart movie company. New 
Line Cinema, to compete in the big 
leagues. (New Line, a major movie compa- 
ny, is swimming in money after its pur- 
chase in January by Ted Turner, the media 
mogul.) And a third factor is Hollywood's 
relentless pursuit of bloody dramas. De- 
spite all toe high-minded statements by 
executives and the Motion Picture Associ- 
ation of America that too many movies are 
just appallingly violent, the studios hunger 
for violent scripts, the bloodier the better. 


An action film’s release abroad can often 
double its gross. 

Black, 32. seems unusually modest 
about his success. Of his screenplays, be 
said simply, “It’s not brain surgery.” 

Besides “Lethal Weapon,” he has been 
involved action films including “Lethal 
Weapon 2,” “The Last Boy Scout” and 
“The Last Action Hero,” the Arnold 
Schwarzenegger flop last year. “It would 
take two hours to explain what went wrong 
with that one,” he said. 

It took him less than six months to write 
the current script, which involves a woman 
named Samantha Caine, a wife and moth- 
er who suffers amnesia about her earlier 
life. In fact she was a professional killer. 
Soon enough, bad guys come back and 
threaten Samantha and her young daugh- 
ter. (The front-runner for Samantha’s part 
is Geena Davis, executives say.) 

“What 1 wanted to do is not be afraid to 
give a woman character as serious a role as 
I would a roan character." he said. “The 

S tation is to keep a woman soft and 
He added, “I also wanted to do a 
story about a mother and daughter, about 
a woman who uses her skills as a profes- 
sional killer and mother to protect her 
child” 

Black said some of his writer friends 
were more talented than he but had not 
struck gold. “I don’t ever pretend to be 
better than other people,” he said. 

He completed the screenplay about 10 
days ago and drove to the office of his 
longtime agent. David GreenbJatl at JCM 
on July 15. By July 1 8 the script was set to 
studios, and the next day the bidding war 
had begun. 

The three major bidders were New Line, 
Warner Brothers and Columbia Studios. 
Even Disney was interested, but the film's 
obviously high production costs and its 
violent nature needed the approval of Mi- 
chael Eisner, the chairman of Disney, who 
was just recovering from quadruple heart 
bypass surgery. 

Black and his agents, Greenblatt and 
Tom Strickler. were tempted by all the 


offers. Warner Brothers pledged that Joel 
Silver, the studio's top action producer and 
a friend of Black’s since they worked on 
“Lethal Weapon,” would oversee the film. 
Columbia was prodded into the bidding by 
James L. Brooks, who directed Terms of 
Endearment” and “Broadcast News.” 

Brooks, who may seem an unlikely fan 
of Black’s, said in an interview: “Shane has 
a real voice. The craft of the script is 
extraordinary. The guy can write dialogue. 
Anyone who's a sucker for a great line is 
going to have a great time with this.” 

But it was New Line that prevailed, after 
hours of meetings at I CM on Thursday. A 
dominant reason was, of course; the mon- 
ey. the most paid for a script after Joe 
Eszterhas’s S3 million for “Basic Instin ct " 

G REENBLATT said New Line 
had also pledged that filming 
would begin shortly, for release 
next summer, and that the di- 
rector Renny Harlin and Davis, to whom 
Harlin is married, would probably direct 
and star in iL They are soon to start a 
pirate film. “Cutthroat Island." but the 
fate of that movie is now uncertain. 

Greenblatt said Black was especially en- 
thusiastic about the Harlin-Davis combi- 
nation and the fact that New Line had 
pledged that the movie would be placed on 
the fast track. 

The actual deal involved $3.5 million 
paid by New Line to Black, plus a $500,000 
producing fee. Also involved as producers 
are Harlin (who has directed action films 
including “Ctiffhanger,") and Sieve Tisch. 

Tisch, one of the producers of “Forrest 
Gump,” the No. 1 film this weekend, said: 
“The special thing about this script is you 
were actually reading a movie. You see the 
movie while you read iL” 

Black is the screenwriter of “Lethal 
Weapon” and other action films. Had an 
unknown written the screenplay, execu- 
tives said, it would hardly have generated 
the same money and frenzy. In fact, it 
would probably have been on the slush pile 
at a talent agency. 


■ 4 * 


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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, July 27, 1994 










Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX: 11 3.68g| 

Injemaflonal Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
internationally invastable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 b 100. 

120 ; 



130 


90“ 



F M A M 
1993 

J J 

1994 

F Mr A M J J 

1993 1994 

| North America 


Latin America 

Approx, weigh&ig: 26% 
Ctoea 9350 Prev.: 93.55 

wrosi 

nalq 

Approx, mightag: 5% nfl 

Oj»: 1 19.66 Prev.: HB.76 fUg 



The Max tracks U.3. doBor rakes of stocks Ik Tokyo, Ham York, London, and 
AngonMna. AustraBn. Austria, Belgium. Brazil, Canada, CM*. Danmark, Finland. 
Franca, Garmany, Hong Kong, Baly. Mexico. Nathartenda, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vanazuala. For Tokyo. Now York and 
London, ffw Max b composed of the SO tap Issues n terms of market apBaBzeSan, 
otherwise the ten top stocks am rradtod- 


I Industrial Sectors 1 


Tm. Prw. % 

dm dm iteig* 


To*. 

dm 

PlVK 

dm 

% 

dragt 

Eiwgjr 

112.39 112-67 -025 

CqAal Goods 

11527 

115.69 

-0.36 

Utities 

121.16 119.92 +1.03 

Raw Materials 

128.79 

127.97 

+0.64 

Finance 

117.13 11651 +0.19 

Consumer Goods 

99.17 

99.13 

+004 

Services 

119.32 118.65 +0.56 

HsceBanaous 

129.08 

128.83 

+0.19 

For mors information about ffie Index, a booklet Is avaXabte tree of cherge. 

Write to Ttfb Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe. 92521 NetdBy Codex, Fiance. 


Clntemadonal Herald Tribune 


DEC Loss 

Shrank in 
Quarter 

Firm Improves on 
Previous Period 


Bloomberg Business New 

MAYNARD, Massachusetts 
— Digital Equipment Corp. 
shares rebounded Tuesday after 
the computer maker reported a 
fourth-quarter loss that wasn’t 
as bad as some analysts bad 
feared. 

The United States’ third- 
laigest computer company re- 
ported a fourth-quarter loss 
from operations of SI 60.4 mil- 
lion, or $1.22 a share. It had 
profit of SI 13.2 million, or 85 
cents, in the year-earlier quar- 
ter. 

While the loss was worse than 
some estimates, it was an im- 
provement from the $183 mil- 
lion, or $134 a share, lost in the 
previous quarter, a figure that 
was four times analysts’ expec- 
tations. 

“It’s pretty bad, but it isn’t 
shocking,” said David Wu, an 
analyst at S.G. Warburg & Co. 

In early afternoon trading. 
Digital shares rose 75 cents to 
$1930. The stock reached a 
three-month low of $18.75 
Monday analysts raised their 
estimates for the quarter’s loss. 

Meanwhile, Amdahl Corp., 
the second-largest U.S. maker 
of mainframe computers, re- 
ported its second consecutive 
quarter of profit after four con- 
secutive losing quarters. The 
positive result was due to lower 
manufacturing costs and a re- 
newed demand for mainframes, 
the company said. 

Amdahl said second-quarter 
net income was $123 million, 
or 1 1 cents a share, compared 
with a loss of $23.69 milli on, or 
21 cents, in the year-ago period. 
Revenue declined to $396.9 mil- 
lion from $463.2 million. 

Wall Street was expecting 
Amdahl, based in Sunnyvale, 
California, to earn 10 cents a 
share: 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Are Creative Ads Effective? 


By Daniel Tilles 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — The view of con- 
sumer marketing companies to- 
ward advertising awards and the 
ad agencies that them might best 
be summed up by a remark once made to 
Donald Gunn, director of creative resources 
for the Leo Burnett advertising agency. 

“We don’t care what you do cm your other 
clients,” said this marketing vice president in 
charge of one of the 10 largest advertising 
budgets in the world. “But if you win a 
creative award for any of our products, the 
business will be put up for review.” 

Mr. Gunn, sufficiently piqued by the widely 
held client notion that award-winning com- 
mercials can't be effective, set out about one 
year ago to determine whether advertising hon- 
ored as the best — typically meaning the most 

imagin ative — docs in fact sdl the product. 

In a speech appropriately titled, “Do 
Award Winning Commercials Self?” Mr. 
Gunn and several invited guests presented the 
results of this research at the recent interna- 
tional advertising festival in Cannes. 

The study examined 200 of the most hon- 
ored TV commercials from 36 competitions 
held around the world in 1992 and 1993. The 
conclusion surprised Mr. Gunn himself: 86 
percent, or 172 of the 200, “were associated 
with marketplace success,” he said. 

The presentation focused on 52 prize- wm- 
nino ads Tor brands and services, including 
Sugar-Free Jell-0 in the United States, the 
Norwegian postal service. Tango orange 
drink in Great Britain and Volkswagen m 
Spain. In all of these cases, business measures 
such as market share, sales and favorable 


image ratings increased during the airings of 
the television ad campaigns. 

For example, during the first run of the 
London ad agency Howell Henry Ghaldecott 
Lilly’s “Orange Man” campaign for Tango, 
sales increased 26 percent. 

A second example was for the electronics 
company Magnavox, developed by Bates 
Worldwide New York. Ads set out to make 
Magnavox’s “old-fashioned image” more 
contemporary, and position it against leading 
brands such as Sony, Panasonic, RCA ana 
Zenith, Mr. Gunn said. During the five-year 
run of a campaign starring comedic actor 
John Cleese, sales doubled. 

Tm comfortable with the implication that, 
all other things being equal, advertising with 
award-winning qualities will outsell mediocre 
ads in the same product category,” Mr. Gunn 
said. But Mr. Gunn acknowledged he had not 
formally compared ads that had won awards 
with those that had not. 

Whole focusing on successes, the presenta- 
tion also touched on failures. Mr. Gunn cited 
several factors that had contributed to the 
failure of a prize- winning ad to make a posi- 
tive difference in the marketplace. Without 
citing specific cases, he blamed poorly identi- 
fied creative strategies and incorrect target 
audience definitions as two culprits. 

But despite the positive market results of 
most award-winning ads, client attitudes to- 
ward them may remain difficult to change. 

“About half the clients couldn’t care less if 
ads are award-winning or not,” said Sean 
Fitzpatrick, vice chairman at the McCann- 
Eridcson advertising agency, a participant in 
the presentation. “They just want effective 
See PRIZE, Page 13 


Airwave Bids Draw Gasps 

One Company Offers $50 Million for License 


By Teresa Riordan 

jVrw York 7unes Service 

WASHINGTON — The Federal Commu- 
nications Commission is holding the first auc- 
tion for the right to use the public airwaves in 
America, and the opening multimillion-doUar 
bids — five times as high as analysts had 
expected — drew gasps from the audience 
and astounded perhaps everyone but the bid- 
ders themselves. 

The auction for 10 nationwide licenses, 
which are expected to be used for advanced 
two-way pa gin g services, began Monday and 
continued Tuesday. 

It will end only when each of the 29 compa- 
nies doing the bidding has either dropped out 
or won one or more licenses. The limit for any 
single bidder is three licenses, and based on 
Monday’s action, at least half of the licenses 
will serf for at least $30 million. 

[Top offers quickly soared to a total of $307 
milli on — including $50 milli on for a single 
license — soon after the FCC opened the 
second day of bidding, Bloomberg Business 
News reported. 

[In the 21th round of bidding Tuesday 
afternoon, 15 bids were submined, down 
from 20 in the closing round Monday night. 
High bids ranged from $9 milli on for the least 
powerful licenses to $50 million for the most 
powerful More than a dozen companies, 
some of which submitted multiple bids, made 
offers on Tuesday.] 

The licenses cover swaths of the radio spec- 
trum that are to be used for nationwide net- 
works that will enable subscribers to not only 
receive paging signals but also respond to 


them with either text messages or voice mail 

Representatives of the participating com- 
panies entered their bids anonymously, from 
computer ter minals behind drawn curtains. 

The companies taking pan included big 
players in the paging business, Adelphia 
Communications, Ainouch Paging, Bell- 
South Wireless, Mobilemedia Communica- 
tions, the Nationwide Wireless Network, and 
U S West Communications. 

“Everybody is surprised about the amount 
of money that's showing up,” said Mark J. 
Golden, vice president of the Personal Com- 
munications Industry Association. “The sky 
is the limi t-' 1 * 

The bidding is seen as something of a dress 
rehearsal for auctions to begin late this year 
for a set of potentially even more valuable 
licenses for the next generation of cellular 
communications, known as personal commu- 
nications services, or PCS. 

The government had estimated that the 
auctions later this year might bring in S10 
billion dollars. But if the competition is as 
intense then as during the bidding on Mon- 
day and Tuesday, the figure could go much 
higher. 

Until now r , the FCC has given away li- 
censes to use the public airwaves. But last 
year, Congress passed a law mandating that 
many types of nonbroadcast licenses be 
awarded to the highest bidder. 

When the results of the bidding on Monday 
were announced, many in the room registered 
their surprise with gasps. One company had 
bid $20 million each for two different li- 
censes, which was twice the next highest bid. 


Deutsche Bank 
Defies Odds to 
Post Mild Cain 


By Brandon Mitchener 

Internathmal Herald Tribune 
FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG said Tuesday that it 
posted a small gain in operating 
profit in the first half of 1994 in 
spite of sluggish lending and a 
sharp decline in income from 
trading for its own account. 

Hilmar Kopper, the bank's 
chair man, said be expected the 
waning recession in Germany 
and elsewhere would not seri- 
ously damage the bank's full- 
year results, which he predicted 
would fall short of its record 
year-earlier earnings but re- 
main “above average.” 

The prediction cheered 
shareholders and analysts, w ho 
had expected greater problems. 
“It looks as if they'll produce 
the same pretax figure as they 
did last year, by a different 
route, which is better than the 
market had dared to hope for,” 
said Derek Bullman, an analyst 
at James Capel & Co. 

The bank’s shares rose 7 
Deutsche marks to 735 DM a 
shar e on the Frankfurt Stock 
Exchange before the company’s 
report was released and contin- 


Hong Kong Wrestles With Transition 

Banking Cartel to Remain Land Sale Draws High Price 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Wary of unsettling its banking sector as 
Hong Kong approaches a return to Chinese rule in 1997, the 
government said Tuesday it would leave largely intact a banking 
cartel that sets savings deposit rates in the British colony. 

Currently, by government endorsement, Hong Kong’s banks 
detide the maximum rales its 174 members can pay savers for 
Hong Kong dollar deposits, a policy cited by the local Consumer 
Council as a way for banks to achieve high profitability interna- 
tionally at local customers' expense. 

“The government considers it important, while trying to en- 
courage more competition in the market, to strike a balance with 
the need to maintain stability of the monetary and banking 

See BANKS, Page 15 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupazcha 

HONG KONG — The government sold a parcel of land 
Tuesday for a higher price than many analysts had expected, 
raising doubts about whether government measures to cool the 
overheated real-estate market had succeeded. 

A consortium of developers paid 890 milli on Hong Kong 
dollars ($1 15 million) for a 23.800-square-meter (28,560-square- 
yard) private residential site in the New Territories, well above 
expectations of between 600 million and 700 milli on dollars. But 
analysts said a note of caution permeated the auction. 

“From the bids, I could sense a little optimism after a string of 
negative news for the property sector,” a property consultant- 
said. “But it’s hedged with reservations.” 

The site went to a consortium comprising Hong Kong Park- 

See LAND, Page 15 


ued to rise in after-hours trad- 
ing on (he news of lowrr- ihan - 
expected provision figures and 
speculation about a dividend 
increase. 

Despite a number of spectac- 
ular scandals involving major 
clients, the bank said die need 
for risk provisioning had fallen 
substantially “in line with the 
incipient recovery of the Ger- 
man economy.” 

The bank's first-half operat- 
ing profit included overall pro- 
visioning of 885 million DM 
($556 million), including 473 
million DM in connection with 
the collapse of the real estate 
empire of Jurgen Schneider, 
who disappeared around Easter 
with his wife, and 147 million 
DM on bad bond trades. 

Overall the h ank was san- 
guine about its performance in 
a “difficult year.” 

After risk provisions, the 
bank’s first-half operating prof- 
it totaled 2.66 billion DM, a 3.9 
percent increase over the first 
half of 1993. Net interest in- 
come was virtually unchanged 
at 5.82 billion DM, while net 
commission income rose 5.9 
percent to 3.09 billion DM. 

Profit from trading for the 
bank’s own account took a 67 
percent plunge, to 332 million 
DM, as a result of volatile bond 
markets early this year. 

The bank's net profit for the 
first half fell 12.9 percent, to 
977 milli on DM, largely as a 
result of a 27 percent rise in its 
tax burden. 

Its pretax profit, including 
about 238 million DM in ex- 
traordinary earnings from the 
sale of large stakes in Daimler- 
Benz AG and Karstadt AG, 
rose 7.4 percent to 2.47 billion 
DM. Mr. Kopper said the 
bank’s total income from the 
sales — around 1 billion DM — 
would be spread over the full 
year ami mostly funneled into 
the bank’s reserves to minimize 
the resulting tax liability. 


RJR Says 
Operations 
Earn More 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — RJR Na- 
bisco Holdings Corp. said 
Tuesday that second-quarter 
earnings fed because of ex- 
penses from early debt retire- 
ment, but operating results 
rose. 

The maker of brands tike 
Winston and Camel cigarettes. 
Oreo cookies and Ritz crackers 
said operating earnings were up 
1 1 percent from tobacco and 20 
percent from continuing opera- 
tions in food. 

The company said the do- 
mestic tobacco business, caught 
in a fierce price war a year ago, 
continues to rebound from last 
year’s weak earnings. 

Including extraordinary items 
and preferred dividend pay- 
ments, RJR said net income 
skidded to $14 nriffion in the 
three months ended June 30, 
compared with $70 million a 
year ago. 

The results for the latest quar- 
ter reflect a $146 million loss on 
early retirement of debt and pre- 
ferred stock dividend payments 
of $32 million. The results for a 
year ago were reduced by $65 
million for early debt retirement 
and reflected $7 million in pre- 
ferred stock dividends. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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55S 2 vie zwi «» wu Uim mm ha 

Htw York and Zurich, fiWnps la other amten: Toronto 

one tUiar; V Unto ot 160; NA: not tnU*H «■*-' «# 


uns 

UL9 

AW* 


Eurocurrency P>po>H» 

SWIM 


French 


July 26 

Dollar 

P'Mart 

Franc 

Stv+inB 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

1 manffi flMVi 

4 VW4 W. 

4Hi-4Va 

5 Vw-5 *• 

StvSf. 

2-2 v. 

5^5 ■v. 

limmftis 4 <Vr4 Bw 

4tW% 


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SV5N 

ZMrfU 

3 '**■«'+. 

6 months 5iMPh 



Stk-Skh 

5*^5% 

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S*i-i «. 

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Sources; ttsutorxUovttsBank. 

flWH 

6VS-6 th 



S >vS*. 


IMu eopBoobb to tnterbmk deposits eftt motion minimum (or ooutvahrdl. 


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” OSW OeedtBroc. 

— ■ 25 -5 

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MM* SS« *** 

krone £££**■ MB 

pO*" 01 kd*o»I 

^ 159,5 


cwincr w* 
Mewiieso iww 

tLltatoods loses 
MTKMM SS245 
ran.Pt* 2008 
Poaskxutr MW 
Port escudo WW3 
Buh. ruble 30S2M 
SBuortm u* 
n»t uw 


Conwxar 

5.Afr,rand 

S.KW.WWI 

SMMLfcnma 

Taiwan i 

nulbatt 
TurMctiUra 
UAE Arharn 
Vaacz. bftdv- 


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xms 

BOMS 

7JOY 

3061 

S3JW 

31421 

UJ7) 

nun 


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31 h 
Th 
4* 
020 
503 
440 
Sfi 
&0B 
U8 
in 

1 st 

MarrlU LyndiSMoy Heady asset 179 

DbcoartralB 

CoA money 2 


United State 
Mscoont rate 
Prime rate 
Federal folds 

SuwattiCDi 
Cosun. pomt IN dm 
3-otttitti Treasury Nil 

1- rtor Treasonr bill 

2 - rear Tramrr rate 
5-year Trunorr note 
^wTVmrrHh 
te-year Treeaory note 


t juwik 

iHnrvpoxn ntnuni 


2K. 
2 k. 


Ptbv. 

316 

Th 

tit 

420 

IDS 

435 

in 

6JJ9 

UB 

iX 

72t 

7.52 

171 

IV 
2% 
2 
2 Mi 


Bfttald 


Baric bme rate 

5V. 

514 

Colt money 

514 

485 

Hnunlli tehrtwnlt 

5 Vm 

5h 

Unooth intertxnw 

514 

5*. 

Mnirili latertwnt 

5SL 

5 V> 

te-vearout 

138 

Z2I 




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5.10 

SM 

Coll money 

5% 

514 

Vmootli hrtertmk 

» 

Me 

hnnlfelahrtnk 

5* 

iL 


51W 

4L 

ift+rwroAT 

IUL 

/Jl 


Lynch, Bank ol Tokyo, Commerzbank, 
Gnamreit Montagu. Credit Lvumats. 

Odd 


•Mn Currency 
C 

1JW9 janonw*"" 

13521 

. m r /rT fif th I Brussels I > Battca Cammerck 

Tokyo tTtdtrol; ROM Book 

Tt Reuters arkSAP- 




4+BWrth tatwhonk 

2K 

2K 


AM. 

PAL 

Chin 

JWOY 

AMOY n-doy 

mfwrCrariiwrteMd 

O 

435 

Zurtai 

mso 

38U5 

+ 1X0 

1JB17 

13829 L3BO 

Germany 



Umdoa 

385X5 

38420 

+ 1JD 

9*0 

HJX 97JS 

LomOard rare 

Aim 

CM 

too 

■ M 

New York 

xuo 

387.W 

+ 120 


null no 
of Canada 


tmwtfclntortei fc 
(HBontti Interbank 
TO-vear Bund 


SuDO 

5M 

SM 

M3 


SJO 

SM 

5M 

M3 


US. dattan oar ounce. LentfcnaflfefarfZa- 
MvZurtChandHew rork opening onct ckn- 
kta Prices; Net York Como » SAuoust! 
Source: Pevterf. 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
trusL J advisors helped 
adminisrer the finances 
and protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find that same 
personal service at Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
hanking is more about people than 
numbers. Its about the shared val- 
ues and common goals thar forge 
strong bonds between hanker and 


client. It's also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leadjng position in 
private banking. .As a subsidiary 
of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we're parr of 
a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 
These assets continue to grow 


substantially, a testament to the 
group's strong balance sheets, risk- 
averse orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

All banks in the group are 
locally managed, attuned to the 
language and culture of their cus- 
tomers. They share a philosophy 
that emphasises lasting relation- 
ships and mutual trust. Those 
values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


\ SAFRA BANK 

imeless Values. Traditional strength. 


HEAD offiCC: GENEVA 1204 • 2. PLACE DU LAC ■ TEL 1022) 705 55 55' FOREX; 1022 1 705 5S 50 AND GENEVA 1201 • 2, RUE DR. ALFRED-VIHCENT iCORNER 
QUA i DU MONT-BLANCi BRANCHES LUGANO 6901 - 1. VIA CANOVA • TEL (091 > 23 B5 32 • ZURICH 8039 • STOCXERSTRASSE 37 ■ TEL 101 1 ZB8 IB IS . 
GUERNSEY ■ RUE DU FRE - SF. PETER PORT • TEL. 1481 1 711 76! AFFILIATE: REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATMNSc 
GIBRALTAR - GUERNSEY ■ LONDON - LUXEMBOURG ■ MILAN ■ MONTE CARLO * MRIS * BEVERLY HILLS • CM MAN ISLANDS ■ L0S AMGELE5 • MEXICO CITY - MIAMI • 
MONTREAL • NASSAU ■ NEW TORX - BUENOS AIRES • CARACAS - MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEL ESTE - RIO DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO - BEIRUT * BEIJING • HONG KONQ ■ 

JAKARTA - SINGAPORE ■ TAIPEI ' TOKYO 







I 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TMBUNF WF-HNESPAY, JULY 2 T, 1994 


DIARY 


I Vo AMOdawd Pw» 


Weak Earnings 
Shake Wall Street 

fell for the first ume in four ““* £*“* „ ~ a share, 

sessions as oil shares slumped 0 ^h hSmed disap- 

after Chevron reported weaker- and market- 

than-expected earamgs. F 1 dropped % to 43 . 

Unexpectedly low profits at mg results, PP“ 

Eastman Kodak and a warning Texaco declined *b to ww | 
from Boeing of lower sales in after announcing lower-“an 
the second half pushed their exp ected ,« ?«% 

shares down and undermined Amoco dropped {» to w 

the market as a whole. Dedin- Royal Dutch PewteiunfeUIW 

Sg bond prices and the dollar s to 1 10 V 4 m and Shell Tramport 
mg & Trading’s American dep<*i- 

U.S. Stocks tary receipts, each standing for 

TZ six ordinary shares, dropped 1 n 

weakness against the yen also _ 
took a toll on the market, deal- 
ers said . . , 


□aBy closings ... 

Dow Jt^.induslnBl avurago 


Dow Jones Averages 

Lnw u»i a*. Metals _ 1M _. 16 ji 1<W 5 18125 —033 

° wen *** —Aid rw PWH». W 14S^ 145*0 165*0 W5JJ0 —CL75 

Stawla,J & ^ 8 Si | 1 || H IM 

es. i aagaa fttm ** « yigig 

“ W ’S 3 :S 3 Stocklndwe* ... 

TIM . ... Htft LO" O"" amm 

Dolton PW m ^rKi tn »w, fvi 527SJJQ S28S00 PTSE Wl (L1FFE) 

NYSE Indexes Soot . S2^ SMJW awWtxtM __ . 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


HtM Low La*t Sottte W «8 


InAs 373109 3MU1 ZTfiSt PlUI -Ltj 

tSv wSSfe’f&S'S M 

ma 1893 inn inn iolti „ „ 

Comp 129*27 129865139195129572 —2*0 


iojso' ifjjs rea» : — ors 
PKtftoOB So 165 J 5 18*0 165*0 I 45 J 0 -<U 5 
BM Art at wtoSes 15 * 34 . Ononlnf. 1 M 44 



U.S./AT THEwgj 

Chevron Net, Freedof ^g^^. : 


NYSE Indexes 


ComWHitB 

I ndustri als 

Troop. 

UtHFtv 

Flnonco 


Htgti Low Lo*t a*®- DoUortP 

330.73 XUU -<W* ftniri 

309.49 308J6 30042 —0*7 

WI4 244*9 244.54 - 0.10 _ 

M 205.03 » AM “OH 

211*7 2I0J6 711.17 —0*7 


Forwort 6 MS» : ~ ■ — ^ ' 

TIN . - Htfl Low 00" omm 

Dolton per m ^TSo 32 a} m 5275*0 S2BS*0 PTSE »• (L1FFE) 

BL* ^ Mal £" r ““ 3 ST mu, »« ta 

ZIHCJSMClOlHgiW™» g» St. NT. 31445 * 7 * 

WJ0 WA31 971 JO mso fcfl. votumv: 10,121 (?P«1 1"L: mais 

90*0 90*0 9M*0 997*0 CAC « CMATIP) _ . 


cone of 5** ouuw- 

ifflsjssssa®:' 

rwrai blamed on a nse tn „ 


r' k ‘. 

#i ,u 


‘.d: F:M AM. 

1994 • 


NASDAQ Indexes 


lo 66%. 


ConvtKRe 

Industrious 

Bunks 

irwirwiee 

Finance 

TransP. 


HiOh LOW Lust CM- OK 

716^23 714*7 71W1 -1^ J«*i 
725*1 734.10 79iW —0^3 So= 
MSOT 753.15 745.93 -U* Dec 
^TlO B84.94 >91.10 “Jg MOT 
934*4 932>» JU> 

7iaS 715*8 717*2 —4*1 5M> 


27 'A 2 «* HW - 

31» 30^ 31 'A -<‘- 

32 31 '« 31 W -W 

IDA lDVa 10*0 -1A 

20 ’A 14 V, IM» *1 

Si* ibis !S» -* 


Htota LOW UK* Ow. 
434.91 433.90 43 A 50 * 0*4 


SS '£& T -=T?S Dow Jonos Bond Averages 

ss =: ~ 


took a toU on the market, deal- second-quarter net ■■ — ; 5 J*S ra *5 n 

ers said. . J cents a NY SE Host Actives _ ffiSS M ™ 71 

The Dow Jones industnal -hare from SI 1 3 a year ago, less ««*. wan uiw u«r cm*- . “**' 

erage, which had foicast of 88 03 g- S gj; \'3 AMEX Stock Index 

pomts over *c past t^e^ud cents and Enough to <hive down ^ Bgjfi Sr J. ^ hr* uw, u 

“f 3 5 d «r eU 6 - ,d p “ for sr- bk 1 1 ^ 

ce^^Tha?'^ on 4 . g* 1 1 fi £ ^6 Dw. 4 ww.BmH.Aj 

New York Stock Exchange. * IS Sate of ig ?S "^S 

STdM?»i Sffi- BP wr S ' 4 « - lEfiu a 

SJSS?taldSr2 HASDAQ Most Actives DYSEDfarj 

7.56 percent before clos- l^Tlippcd H to »«■ ™ S? “ 

s&^ffSsaS P 

sas««i saBa-sssSfa 

^ I Alnhnfthl 


Financial 

Ktrt Law Odm O 

wmjwth rrexygo (UFFQ 

mgybao-XiOtlHpa 

ST H 57 *8 

DM 9358 9JS 

g“ 9327 9122 

*£? WJ1 91*5 

S- 9i*o ea* 

2S- 91*7 91*1 

jw *MZ 1141 

m 9128 91^5 

52L 91(14 91*4 

S5- 9ft*B *J|B4 

7'™ 9073 90.72 . 

■ h E*l. voMtie: SWZ.OP«n W 

J-MWTH EU1WDOI L^BS (UFTO 

IK «S ® 88 

Si RLT. 3354 
iS NIT- N,T.. 9127 


^"■SSTasus -N.T. 

j]L mu mojo n.t. . 

53 lt|S m {J.T. 

s& 21 &* 21 »« _K:t: 

Est. velwTw: 44 * 17 . Open kit* 4 UTL 

Source: 2 S 

Landed 7nH Finondai Futures Excttm ft 
inn Pn t rott vm exehaaa*. 


DWdondo 


witnoui max tuwfiw, — - — j. rhernm Diamco 

of 54 peroeat in net results, 

cnide-ofl prices and^owcr x^^K pg^od <jp revenue of $3 

.gteSB«S£»X 

SeoWn.ItaAedm.MomnSart^ 

..sasarKsSsssssr 

-iSifflsr*sSKSSS«S! 


HJ9 4-0*1 
H10 4-0*1 

«*5 Une*. Comsat Com 
??54 UmJL comnunitv l 


SiS "** Mjj -** 

AM A 1*4 — W 

Stk »■* mj; -jij 
si so an* ♦*" 


3* Bonds 
10 Utilities _ 
10 Industrials 


^st. volume: lW: 300 6.71 A 

MWNTHEUROMA^ IL 1 FFEJ 
D» 1 m auon-rt«ull«^ 

S* M «S 

S££ SS 94J7 . Nfl 

9451 MJS7 
4 m 94*2 


I Comr nnY Per Ami Par. nc 

IRREGULAR 

qwmBfc qg l rtL - 1-Sg %!f SS 

BRSu- 

INCREASED 

Comsat Coo» 2 8^19 

SS 0 ^ 801 " § ->i « IS 


w ^ 1 a B IS 

,r™ sssie™. s s « », 

„ REDUCED 

as ;s& gs^ssras 1 « a » 

94*3 + 0*2 N tou Wun Porwitr « 

WLS 7 + **1 INITIAL 

S 3 igj Dunn Corpn ' - ^ ^ ^ 

93*3 + 0*1 ptfStBCP - * 

tSSl REGULAR 


FW Source g 8-5 8-22 

S 2 S 2 S&DD. § S M M 2 


NASDAQ Moat Actives NYSE Wary 


Dollar Slips as the Yen 
Stays at Center Stage 

CwMbyOwSnfl From ***** “JW* |W JJX SSI I S 
NEW YORK - Tta dollar abou^c «df 


TdCmA 

PTTrPol 

PwraaN 

MedVsn 

MJcstl 5 

UieStar 

Cisco s 
MO 

IrmovTwt 

AlphaBta 

Cortoch 

Oactes 

UShHtiS 

□xfdHIIS 

Intel 


VOL HW Low Last OW 

Tjy, ink IT* - ^ Advanced 

nv> 7144 an - 

ah ATta 43 — 7w unoiongea 

2-A 19a 1’9|. — lift. Total Issues 

SW, 50H, -'Vi. NewHfete 

395 7V, 3Vh *1 New LOWS 

ss aS -=a — — - — 

» m £ -* AMEX Diary 

aa ja 534 ^ 

jrMi 35 Vj 37Vi »144 

S3>4 47 52Va +4JJ 

saw, 57 57V. -'A SSSSwi 

Tow issues 
NowHWn 

— Mew Lows 


Mil 0509 9S.11 +0*1 

WM M? 9503 + (1*2 

SS S 77 + 0*2 

115 IS ' 9457 +8*1 

MJ 4 5 SS W 22 + 0-01 

i e n 1 


927 1077 

1145 1050 

757 no 
2849 2837 

2fl 35 

SS 47 


Japan wonld no, reach an - 


AMEX Most Actives — — 

vol Mib law Last ON- NASDAQ Diary 

XfiocB 11705 M 14 3Wl 

3 ft ff Advancjed 

^4 ijj IW VSwnSS 

ESS* 4 #M 45 »/H dSVH Wu — **• New HR) Its 

^ - , *” - New Lows 


wn «jw» -^ 7 — 

4211 lVi. 1JJ '*u 

3470 0'A 7Jfc 8 9 

3417 1<V U IR l«Vn 


249 349 

285 294 

M 2 W 

907 792 

6 10 

11 13 


1497 1447 

1993 1991 

1978 2029 

SMB 5047 
S 3 51 

105 98 


aaragJM gggKjss 

Forokin Exchange sume cadis for a strong yen, a 

t strategy they pursued last year, 

the U ^.-imposed deadline was ^ Johnson said. A strong yen 
reached Sunday. . , makes Japanese exports more 

The yen received additional expensive, 
support on motors’ view that Dealers said the yen proba- 

Japan’s economic fundamen- would maintain its stronger 

tals are more stable than those bty ^ a spokes- 


Market Sales 


UlMLjuN. NY5E 

strong yen a m . 


Najdan 

InmIUtam. 


SpatCgBiMOdWaa 

Commodity TBdoy 

Aluminum , lb °f*2 

Cooper riedrolYHc, lb 1.19 
fi^TOB-ton mn 

SHW.tniVW 5*15 

sm*M«raP).ton ^ 

\VtX * ma 


S n I? E !9 

S& &v! ^v d SS JSS 

Jl E 5 L volume: 55*64. OP«n inL; VB, 401. 

WAOHTH PIBORIMAT.PI 

e - "' fins wi +8*4 

S£ g 9 KS J2S 

Jtm na 93 ^ +0*3 

1 M H s| m 

LONG GILT (L IP FE> 

r*‘f'aa -is 

°E#. whimo^tsss. Opwt mt: 1 ‘1R44R 
gbhmahgovernj^ht euwd iuffb 

» Is Ss as =a I 

wolun»?nM9. Own tat: 7 IftW- 
10-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONOS (MATIFI 

n i i a 

■ I Est. volume: 15L544. Orwn W5 141*69. I sm triotor 
1 1 

I inUUBUKua 1 USX- D otal 

HRta LOW Lbs! Srtlta CWi I 


_ imcEml 

4^5 Jhi^isus 1532 S 152 J 5 ia» UngL WotKtas Johnson 

SS? §1 »S SMS o^PW-aL-tatanr; 


119*7 SCP 
35931 Oct 
04787 NOV 


8 kb 94 M 

r ^ ^ fg 

Q *2 W 9-15 
O US 94 9-339 
0 S M 8-17 
a JB B -17 9-15 
q 35 B -23 9-15 
_ JOT *13 MB 
me B -23 93 B 
Q 9-23 *M 4 

Q fl 9-16 9-30 
Q .TO 9-19 HW 
Q .IBS B -15 9-15 
Q 38 1-11 9 T 
Q *4 8-17 Ml 
Q JS GIB 9 -TO 
Q 40 H H 

a w *g SS 

o *1 

8 :E *& M 3 

1 S VS 

| £ 

q ^ frS 9-10 

‘S -"S « uS 

O ^ 9-15 1 M 
8 S 9-1 M* 
q & M MJ 

g M 8-12 9-1 

in 8-1 M 

<3 *s 9 a 935 

o *5 54 9-10 

8 37 M MB 

3 *5 M 9-10 

_ JB 10-15 1 M 
O *1 84 99 

O 42 H «2 

■ CBMMMdcn- 


Slow Aircraft Sales Dent Boeing Net 

SEATTLE (Bloom y— lor - 

- r 

Of , 

S 759 .bffipo m.*c 1993 q mng. j u-u ^^jarvac likely to . 
Hoang sad sales JSf xhc camnny is sucking 

SKSfflS'S? iftS- W brnkaandddivch^ 

about 260 aiitraft- 

Strong Sales Lift Tenneco Net 67 % 

HOUSTON (Combined Di *P a “jE ) 1 35 jfKft . 

improved margins and stron ger sal« jaidTucsday. . 

AP> 

Avon Posts Lower 2 d-Quarler Profit 

1 vtttiw vnor /rvwnhmMl TiKDatches) — Avot Products 


125 |u« 15635 156*0 — 87S I _ mufiiir m '*m 

!g 3 SS SIS ®S=S ■ 


roee to SiX.1 biffion ftom S9203 . 
direct marketer of cosmetics add related ; 

tacaAto focnsits resomces 


.bm Banks Wary of Shifts in U.S. Interstate Rules 

r _ »w 6 awrvGmriAfY will 


a/ Or V 

Set also put doUar B y Lawrence Malkin ^ S^cSp £ “ “ 

SfttaMfeS deeded to boid iast-mmute ^ banking SS^fiESSS fi branches. 

U.S. gross domestic product The dollar dosed Tw»day ;*t law wiU not .overfly Jwimmate aggnM banks o^oalin^ in n^or U A modc of expansion fits with the 

S ^ 

SSSSas 


Rv Lawrence Malkin banks and by President Bill Chnton, is » rtdt onm 

f j • jf naald Trihr- now virtually certam to pass. . \ L P *ma Sr the owners of small banks 

NEW YORK -A n^ ba^mg g -and convert tirem into tireir btand.es. 

w ^» ot . ov ®2 ll J^ l, S ail< i ISSs 200 foreign banks operating m ngor U£. expansion fits with the 

banl^ ^g to expand »am:css er ^ 3^ up regipnd bran^«. J^TmStXcrican banks, said 


lnaxascu ucrcuuv — . • - . 

mfw YORK fKoomberg) — ' Loral Corp. saidTriesday fiscal 
firet-qoarter ^earnings rose 36 percent as revenue jumped on * 

“^3 SSdif«»e : »d#pa : 

income was $55 imIHon m the quarter ended . 

^dmillion in the 1993 quarter. Revenue rose 58 percent, to . 

$1 M biDion. . ' 

aTgHgatWW *j!: j 

: “cw^onHdenoe in the ! 

remained hi^t, as the CtHtference BoanTs ixxlex dropped w 5^® . 

from 92-5 inJune. 1 ; 


;rh II 


■ v .• 


W flBLP STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Mb Low 


^SrST OPBn'Mrt Low 0« OOCW7 «rt U- . ; W “ 


COMM ' Mbit Low Ome Ota OM 
























** 


Page 13 


EUROPE 


Investors’ Run 

On Russia’s MMM 

Prompts Shutdown 


The Assumed Press 

MOSCOW — Russia's best- 
known investment company 
sharply restricted its operations 
Tuesday amid panic selling of 
its shares and investors’ rears 
that it could collapse. 

i as many as 

3,000 people gathered outside 
the company's headquarters on 
the outskirts erf Moscow, hop- 
ing to cash in their 
Interfax news agency reported. 

The company, MMM, has 
been criticized by President Bo- 
ns N. Yeltsin and others who 
said they were skeptical of its 
promises of returns of 400 per- 
cent to 1.000 percent a year. 

Tax authorities have filed 
charges against MMM affili- 
ates, alleging tax fraud and oth- 
er violations reportedly 
amounting to some 50 billion 
rubles ($25 million). 

Sergei Mavrody, the bead of 
MMM, has warned that gov- 
ernment actions against the 
company could cause civil 
strife. He has also threatened to 

Seek a nfllirtqal refer endum jn 

his battle with authorities. 

The panic selling was 
sparked late last week when the 
government said it would not 
guarantee money put into in 
any of the numerous invest- 
ment funds that have sprung up 
in the past year. 

MMM on Tuesday stopped 
redeeming shares at all but (Hie 
of its Moscow offices because 
of the panic among sharehold- 
ers, said Sergei Taranov, the 
company spokesman. 

“The sale of shares has been 
discontinued due to the disrup- 
tion of the work of cash-deliv- 
ery services," Mr. Taranov told 
Interfax. 

By early Tuesday, there were 
600 people on a list waiting to 


sdl their shares at MMM’s cen- 
tral office — the only one still 
redeeming shares, he said. 

MMM, which is reportedly 
the largest investment company 
in Russia, says it has about 5 
million shareholders. 

Company officials, who only 
publish statements in the media 
and refuse to give interviews, 
have said the fund speculates 
on currency markets, offers 
short-team business loans and 
invests in stocks. 

MMM had won nationwide 
fame with its aggressive adver- 
tising, which promoted dr eams 
of easy money in post-Soviet 
Russia. 

Some have called MMM*s 
and other simil ar companies’ 
investment plans classic pyra- 
mid schemes that will inevitably 
collapse. 

Hundreds of smaller invest- 
ment funds have already fold- 
ed, defrauding hundreds of 
thousands of people of millions 
of dollars. Those hurt have 
blamed the government for 
their losses and demanded com- 
pensation. 

■ Luko3 Plans Sale 

Lukofl, Russia’s leading oD 
company, plans to raise more 
than $3 billion by selling a 15 
patent stake to foreign inves- 
tors, KnightRidder reported, 
quoting company officials. 

Lukoil, whose total assets are 
estimated at $20 billion to $45 
billion, plans to use the pro- 
ceeds from the share issue for 
ofl production and refining pro- 
jects. 

One company source said the 


if auditing estimatwi by 
Western companies, which put 
Lukoil assets at over $30 bil- 
lion, are valid. 


Banco Santander Expands Horizons 


New York Tima Service 

MADRID — Geography may not be 
destiny, but the location of Banco San- 
tander SA provided a due to its future. 

Overlooking the Bay of Biscay and 
dominating the waterfront promenade in 
the northern port city of Santander, the 
tightly run regional bank, founded in 
1857 to finance trade between Spain and 
South America, was built facing the hori- 
zon beyond the seas. 

Banco Santander is now an interna- 
tional financial player, with a presence in 
27 countries ana one of the largest inter- 
national banking networks in Latin 
America. 

Indeed, Emilio Botin 3d, chairman 
like his father and grandfather before 
him, spends half his time flying around 
the world checking into Santander’s for- 
eign operations. 

Just last month, he inaugurated San- 
tander’s new budding in Manhattan as 
headquarters for the bank’s rapidly ex- 
panding operations in the United Slates, 
where one of its most profitable ventures 
has been a stake in First Fidelity Ban- 
corp., based in Lawrenceville, New Jer- 

sey- 

Santander increased its stake in First 
Fidelity last month to 24.9 percent, mak- 
ing it the main shareholder in the h ank. 

Foreign operations accounted for 
more than 42 percent of Santander’s con- 
solidated profit last year, compared with 


a mere 10 percent in 1988. This year, the 
bank's foreign profit is likely to represent 

[The bank reported Tuesday that its 
net profit in toe first half was 51.05 
billion pesetas, up 8 percent from a year 
earlier, Bloomberg Business News re- 

There is a widespread 
belief that Botin always 
makes good deals.' 

Jose Sevilla, analyst with FG 
Inversioaea BursatOea. 


'ported from Madrid. Operating income 
rose 13 percent, to 81.6 billion pesetas. 

[Net interest income rose 8 percent, to 
125.5 bOlion pesetas, while the operating 
margin rose 14 percent, to 176.2 billion 
pesetas.] 

Santander was one of the few Spanish 
banks in a position to absorb troubled 
Banco Espafiol de Cr&dito SA, or Ban- 
esto. That bank was seized by Spain’s 
central bank in December, reorganized 
and auctioned off in April, 
half of its net income, which totaled 
24.55 billion pesetas (SI 87 million) for 
the first quarter of 1994, up 9.7 percent 
from the comparable period a year earli- 
er. 

Outbidding its rivals by more than 15 
percent to acquire 60 percent of the re- 


vamped Banesto, Santander overnight 
became Spain's largest bank in both de- 
posits and assets, with Banesto’s vast 
domestic retail network complementing 
its own rapid international growth. 

"Even though the bid seemed exces- 
sive for an overbanked market," said 
Josd Sevilla of the brokerage company 
FG Inversiones Bursa tiles, "there is a 
widespread belief that Botin always 
makes good deals.” 

Mr. Botin declined several requests for 
an interview, re spending only to written 
questions through a spokesman. Feder- 
ico Ysart 

"The acquisition of Banesto is a fun- 
damental strategic step ahead," his an- 
swer read. “Doubling out business quota 
in Spain will allow us to continue with 
our international expansion from a 
strong domestic base.” 

Before acquiring Banesto, Santander 
was already among the world's most 
profitable h anks, with a return on equity 
of almost 24 percent for the first quarter 
of 1994. Its capita] adequacy ratio stood 
at 13.4 percent, well above the 8 percent 
yardstick established by the Bank for 
International Settlements for 1994. 

Santander's bad debt coverage of 
104.53 percent is also well above the 
provisions of other Spanish banks. 

Unfazed by Banesto’s problems, San- 
tander projects profit from Banesto of 20 
billion pesetas by 1995. 


Shell to Sell Metals Unit to Gencor 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — Royal 
Dntch/SheQ Group said Tues- 
day it would sell its unprofit- 
able Billiton metals and mining 
assets to Gencor Ltd. of South 
Africa for $1.22 billion. 

Shell said the sale would re- 
sult in a $170 million after-tax 
charge against its second-quar- 
ter earnings but that it expected 
that amount to be offset by 
gains from other sales. 

The Billiton operations post- 
ed a loss of $3 2 milli on in 1993, 
mostly because of low alumi- 
num prices. 


Munich Re Sees Drop in Disaster Claims 


Condoled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

FRANKFURT — Mtacheoer Rflckversi- 
cherungs-Gcseflschaft AG, the world’s largest 
reinsurer, said Tuesday that a fall in disaster 
claims bad improved earning s in the financial 
year ended on June 30 and had helped narrow 
underwriting losses. 

In a letter Jo shareholders, the company 
said that a fall in natural-disaster claims 
abroad and unproved fire-insurance activities - 
helped Munich Re more than halve the parent 
company’s underwriting loss of 1.09 billion 
DM ($685 million) from the previous year. 

“Munich Re, in contrast to previous years, 
was spared larger natural disasters,” the com- 
pany said, noting that Hurricane Andrew had 
burdened results for the previous year. 

But the destruction of the European Space 
Agency’s Ariane rocket in January would cost 


Munich Re some 75 million DM, the compa- 
ny noted. 

The company said that the improved par- 
ent underwriting results and better earnings 
at reinsurance units also helped narrow the 
group underwriting loss from a figure for the 
previous year of 13 billion DM. 

Munich Re noted that its units involved in 
the property, accident and credit insurance 
sectors t 

those of the previous years. 

But it was optimistic for net earnings- “We 
expect improved earnings at the parent level” 
and a “satisfactorily positive result in the 
group,” the letter said, without providing fig- 
ures- In the year ended June 30, 1993, the 
group earned 287 nriDian DM while the parent 
earned 71.5 billion DM. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Gencor, a South African 
minin g company, will take over 
Billiton's stakes in mining and 
metals operations in Australia, 
f!»nad a, Colombia, Ghana, In- 
donesia, South Africa, Brazil, 
Surinam and Chile. 

“This is an aluminum play, 
and its success will depend on 
the price of aluminum," said 
Mark Wellesley-Wood, a direc- 
tor at Kldowort Benson Securi- 
ties in London. 

Aluminum prices tumbled to 
$1,139 a ton in 1993 from 
$1,955 in 1989 but rebounded 
to about $1,535 a ton this 
month after the world’s largest 
producers agreed to cut produc- 
tion. 

If aluminum prices in 1993 
had been $150 a ton higher, 
Billiton would have broken 
even rather than lost money, 
Gencor said. 

The Billiton operations Gen- 


cor is acquiring are involved in 
the production and marketing 
of al uminum, nickel, zinc, cop- 
per and gold. 

Gencor said it would finance 
the acquisition with a mix of 
cash from accounts outside 
South Africa, bank loans and 
$300 milli on in bonds Shell will 
purchase from Gencor. 

The transaction does not in- 
clude Billiton's prized 333 per- 
cent stake in the $500 million 
Collahuari copper exploration 
property in Chile, which Billi- 
ton owns with Minorco SA and 
Falconbridge Ltd. The Coll a - 
huasi stake will be sold sepa- 
rately. Shell said. 

Also excluded will be Shell's 
Boddington gold joint venture 
and other exploration projects in 
Australia, winch will be sold asa 
public company in that country. 
Shell said. 



Frankfurt 

DAX .. .. 

London 

FTSE 100 Index 

Paris 

CAC40 










™ vi — 

■ 









\J m — wv 

2000 


200—7- 

OUDU 


ISH ' 

u. 

ZHJ- 


1993 

Prev.- 

Close 

403.S2 

¥ 

'SO"? 

% 

Change 

+0.36 

"“nrr 

1983 

Exchange 

Tsnrj’ 2800 "Tm a 

1983 

index- 

AEX 

M J J 

Tuesday 

Close 

404.96 


Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,581.31 

7,529.48 

+0.69 

Frankfurt . 

OAX 

2,151.96 

2,136.22 

+0.74 

Frankfurt' 

FAZ 

81348 

809.39 

+0.46 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1JB42L39 

1,621.55 

+1.14 

London ' 

Financial Times 30 

2.423.00 

2,412.10 

+0.45 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,117.20 

3.106.10 

+0.36 

. Madrid 

General Index 

310.57 

307.05 

♦1.15 

Milan 

Mia 

1,146.00 

1.173J30 

-2.30 

Paris 

CAC40 

2,07644 

2,059.84 

+0.83 

Stockholm 

Affeetsvaeriden 

1 ,B92_82 

1,690.68 

+0.11 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

456.52 

454.12 

+0-53 

Zurich 

SBS 

925.36 

924.06 

+0.14 


Sources : Reuters. AFP 


InienumiTDl llrialit Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Greece Says EU Clears 
Olympic Air Bailout 

Reuters 

ATHENS — Greece's surviv- 
al plan for its debt-ridden state 
airline, Olympic Airways, has 
been approved by the European 
Commission, Transport Minis- 
ter Theodores Pan gal os said 
Tuesday at a news conference. 

Mr. Pangalos gave no details 
of the final version of the plan 
agreed to by the commission, 
but the core of the program, 
which has been under negotia- 
tion for months, involves a $2 
billion debt write-off. 


To subscribe in G eimcmy 

just ccd, toll Free, 

0130 84 8565 


■ West German factories were running at 823 percent of capacity 
in the second quarter, the highest rate since the third quarter of 
1992, the Ifo economic research institute said. 

■ The European Union said it would examine the recent acquisi- 
tion of the French supermarket chain PG Group by a unit of 
Belgian food retailer Delhaize Frfcres & Cie. *Le lion’ SA. 

■ Swissair said it expected to report better results for the first half 
of 1994 because erf a 103 percent rise in traffic from a year earlier. 

■ West German import prices rose 03 percent in June over May. 
while export prices were unchanged month-on-month, the Federal 
Statistics Office said. 

• Fokker NV, the Dutch aircraft maker, said that if McDonnell 
Douglas Corp. decided to start production of a 100-seat aircraft, 
the move would cause increasing pressure on a crowded market. 

• Two- thirds of Germans favor economic liberalization, including 
more flexible hours for stores and lower labor costs, a survey 
commissioned by a German business group found. 

• National Power PLC Chairman Sir Trevor Holdsworth said Lhe 
British government may sell its remaining 40 percent stakes in Lhe 
utilities National Power and PowerGen PLC early next year. 

• Outokumpu Oy, a Finnish minin g and metals concern, said it 
intended to seek a balance in its metals portfolio, which is now 
heavily dependent on zinc. 

• Banco Comercial Portugues SA the state-owned Portuguese 

bank, said it had launched a bid for 40 percent of Banco Portugues 
do Atiantico SA, Portugal's largest commercial bank. The bid is 
valued at $809 million. Reuters. Bloomberg. AF. AFX 


PRIZE: Client Attitudes May Be Difficult to Change 


British Manufacturers’ Orders Rise 

Reuters 

LONDON — Business is booming for British manufacturers, 
with orders coming in at the fastest rate in the past five years, the 
Confederation erf British Industry said Tuesday. 

The group’s quarterly survey found that a surge in demand had 
lifted output, and it said Lhe trend was likely to continue. 

Economists said the survey showed an economy that was 
forging solidly ahead, although they were less sure what it implied 
for inflation and interest rates. About 20 percent of the companies 
responding expected prices of their goods in the domestic market 
to rise in the next few months. 


Continued from Page 11 

ads for their products. The oth- 
er half are secretly pleased. I'm 
not sure it means anything ei- 
ther." 

Joe McCarthy, North Ameri- 
can advertising director for 
Nike, a company whose adver- 
tising has consistently been 
showered with awards, said: 
“Some clients, mostly large 
packaged-goods clients, think 
advertising must be dry to be 
effective. It’s good to have a 
study that talks to them in their 
own language.” 

Mr. McCarthy also said he 


had seen instances where agen- 
cies chased awards strictly for 
self-promotion: “People can get 
too caught up in the entertain- 
ment side.” 

Mr. Gunn said he hoped Leo 
Burnett would use his work to 
“counterattack” advertisers 


who argue that highly creative 
campaigns are misplaced. The 
study, he said, could provide an 
additional source of ammuni- 
tion for persuading clients 
“who have creative blueprints 
which fly in the face of award- 
winning advertising qualities.” 


For mveshnent information 

read THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 


NYSE 

Tuesday’s Closing 

.Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades eteewhere . Wa The Associated Prass 

(Continued) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


Page 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


To New NEC Chief, 
Multimedia Is Key 


Bloomberg Basinas News 

TOKYO — hi the chandc- 
Uered ballroom of a top Tokyo 
hotel, a Who’s Who of corpo- 
rate and political Japan lined 
up Tuesday to exchange busi- 
ness cards with the new presi- 
dent of the electronics giant 
NEC Corp. 

Wearing formal morning 
dress, Hisashi Kaneko, 60. met 
with NEC’s clients and compet- 
itors, members of Japan's de- 
fense establishment and a line* 
np of politicians that included 
former Prime Minister Toshiki 

Kaif n 

It was the kind of splashy 
bash that hasn’t been seen much 
in Tokyo since the economy 
went into a slump three years 
ago, and Mr. Kaneko used the 
occasion to lay out his vision of 
NECs future: multimedia. 


Hitachi Makes 
Move to Cope 
With High Yen 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO— Hitachi LvL, 
Japan’s largest electric ma- 
chinery maker, said Tues- 
day that the high yen was 
forcing it to move more of 
its manufacturing opera- 
tions overseas. 

Under a new plan, about 
70 percent of what Hitachi 
sells overseas and about 35 
percent of domestic sales 
will be foreign-made, said 
Yosbiko Shibato, a Hitachi 
spokeswoman. The plan 
will be phased into meet 
over a three-year period. 
Miss Shibato stud. 

‘The biggest reason is to 
avoid the risk involving 
currency exchange-rate 
fluctuations,” she said. 

The rapid rise of the yen 
since last year has made 
many of Japan’s products 
costlier abroad. As the yen 
rises in value against the 
dollar, Japanese profits on 
exports drop in yen terms 
while domestic production 
costs rise, fracing up the 
dollar prices of goods. 


Speaking at a news conference 
before the reception, Mr. Kan- 
eko said that multimedia opera- 
tions would propel NEC to re- 
cord profit, by the end of die 
decade: NEC. Japan’s nth-larg- 
est company in terms of sales, 
has strengths in telecomm unicar 
fions, computers and. semicon- 
ductors that will combine to put 
it at the forefront of the multi- 
media revolution, he said. 

“Multimedia is the key to 
growth and will make up some 
60 percent of our business by 
1999,” Mr. Kaneko said. He de- 
clined to say what percentage of 
NECs business multimedia ac- 
counts for today. 

Mr. Kaneko also said be ex- 
pected NECs carrent profh to 
reach 200 btflion yen ($2 bil- 
lion) by that year, which will be 
the 10whamuv«sary of NECs 
founding. NEC is Japan’s larg- 
est personal-computer maker 
and the world’s second-largest 
maker of semiconductors. Its 
current profit in the year ended 
March 31 was 31.8 billion yen. 

The new president, did not 
specify just, how multimedia, a 
catch-all term for technologies 
combining video, computer and 
tdecommumcations, would help 
NEC reach his ambitious target. 
NEC is a leading maker of all the 
ingredients Of multimedia, but 
Mr. Kaneko did not say how he 
intended to rfiang p the company 
to take advantage of this. 

Mr. Kaneko, who replaces 
Tad&hiro Sekimoto, who 
stepped down after 14 years at 
NECs brim, was president of 
NEC America from 1989 to 
1991. He isagradnate of Tokyo 
University and holds a master 
of science degree from the Uni- 
versity of California at Berke- 
ley. He joined NEC in 1956. 

The outspoken Mr. Seki- 
moto, who currently chairs the 
Electronic Industries Associa- 
tion of Japan, a trade group, led 
NEC to record profit of 140 
bfltian yen in the year ended 
March 31, 1991, and then 
watched as the company 
slapped to a profit of only 18.1 
button yea two years later. 

Mr. Kaneko will probably 
follow Ins predecessor’s line on 
com pa ny policy, as Mr. Seki- 
moto was influential in his se- 
lection for the job, according to 
industry analysts. 


Big and Broke in Japan 

Large Firms Seek Funds on OTC Market 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan's cash-strapped corpo- 
rate groups are infiltrating the country's over- 
the-counter share market, threatening to 
blunt the performance of what has been one 
of the world’s strongest indexes. 

Effectively banned from issuing more 
shares themselves, and in need of funds, some 
major corporate groups, or keiretsu, have 
raised equity capital by listing subsidiaries ou 
the OTC market, traditionally home to small, 
high-growth companies. Analysts say that 
many more covet a listing on the OTC mar- 
ket, which has gained about 40 percent so far 
rhfc year. 

“Fust-section companies are taking ad van- . 
tage and starting to crowd out growth compa- 
nies,” said Craig Chudler, managing director 
of the investment advisory firm Thomas Nor- 
ton Associates Lac. 

Mr. Chudler said the listing of keiretsu 
companies was likely to undermine investor 
confidence because they were being sold un- 
der false pretenses as growth companies. He 
added that keiretsu companies were constrict- 
ed by their culture, which renders them un- 
able to fire people or to react quickly to 
changing market conditions, as growth com- 
panies are often able to da 

Mr. Chudler warned that when these com- 
panies failed to produce strong growth, their 
shares would slip, disillusioning investors and 
undermining the OTC market’s butt run. 

He also warned that keiretsu companies 
were reducing the pool of money available to 


small companies unable to lap bond markets. 
He said Japan's corporate giants were turning 
to the relatively small OTC market — 519 
firms are listed — to save money. 

The most recent keiretsu companies to be 
listed on the OTC market were Canon Soft- 
ware Inc. and Bridgestone Meta If a Corpora- 
tion. A spokesman for the camera maker 
Canon Inc. said Canon Software, its subsid- 
iary, was listed to raise money for its expan- 
sion. The spokesman argued that the listing 
would have no impact on OTC share prices, 
market sentiment or the pool of money avail- 
able for other companies. 

He acknowledged, however, that Canon 
Software was likely to grow less quickly than 
many other OTC companies, as 70 percent of 
its business comes from Canon companies. 

A spokesman at Bridgestone Melalfa, a 
subsidiary of the tire maker Bridgestone 
Corp., said its shares had been listed to fi- 
nance the liquidation of a failed joint venture. 

“If the market decides that our listing will 
hit market sentiment, then there’s really noth- 
ing I can say,” he said. 

To put a stop to such issues, some analysts 
have called for the Japan Securities Dealers 
Association, the OTC market regulator, to re- 
fuse to list keiretsu companies. But thHi does 
not appear likely, at least in the near future. 

“We don’t look at whether a company’s 
listing has a bad effect on the market,” an 
association spokesman said. “We have certain 
criteria, and if companies meet them, then we 
let them list.” 


India Levies Mild Fines on Banks 


Reuters 

BOMBAY — A group of 20 
banks appear to have escaped 
with Htue more than a rap on 
the knuckles for their involve- 
ment in India's worst-ever fi- 
nancial s candal, but analysts 
said Tuesday they expected fur- 
ther action. 

The Reserve Bank of India, 
the country's central bank, said 
Monday it was considering 
fines totaling 1.47 billion rupees 
($47 million) on the 20 banks, 
including nine foreign banks, 
for misusing funds in the $1.28 
billion securities scandal. 

But B. Ramparasad, the 
economist for the Indian 
Banks’ Association, said further 
action could be expected. 

“The next move could be 
against individual banks," he 
said. “But what course it will 
take is not certain. To make a 


case against an individual bank 
concrete evidence is needed.” 

The central bank gave the 
banks four weeks to explain 
why they should not pay for 
breaking various rules on port- 
folio management and transac- 
tions in securities. 

The 20 banks are accused of 
diverting deposits to portfolio- 
management schemes to buy 
shares on the stock market 
They are also accused of not 
meeting the reserve require- 
ments set by the central bank 
and breaking its rules by carry- 
ing out forward deals with non- 
bank clients. 

“Such banks may be required 
to pay penal interest for the 
shortfall in cash balances,” the 
central b ank said. 

The scandal erupted in April 
1992 after bankers and brokers 


were found to hare colluded to 
divert funds from the interbank 
securities market to the stock 
markets that were booming at 
the time. 

Bankers say the government 
does not have many options 
and that it could have come 
down hard on the foreign banks 
only at the risk of endangering a 
three-year-old liberalization 
program aimed at opening up 
its long-protected economy. 


Qin^ing 

Sets a Low 
Stock Price 


Bloomberg Businas Net 13 

HONG KONG — China's 
state-owned Qingling Motors 
Co., bowing to market realities, 
will be selling 500 million new 
shares to foreign investors at 
Z07 Hong Kong dollars (27 
cents) each, Hong Kong-based 
investment managers said. 

The price equals about nine 
times the company's estimated 
1994 earnings par share, the 
lowest pricing/ earnings ratio 
offered so far by a state-owned 
Chinese company listing its 
shares in Hong Kong. 

Qingling had net profit of 
481.6 million yuan ($55 million) 
in 1993. It is expected to earn 23 
Hong Kong cents a share this 
year, according to projections 
by two fund managers. 

The lead underwriter for the 
share offering. Smith Barney 
Sheaxson of Asia, refused to 
comment on the pricing. 

Investor enthusiasm for “H” 
shares, or Chinese shares listed 
in Hong Kong, has waned this 
year because of doubts about 
the Chinese economy and 
mounting debts at many state 
enterprises. 

A Smith Barney spokesman 
said a pricing announcement 
would be made Thursday, when 
the second part of the sale — an 
initial public offering of 100 
million shares — is to begin. 

Qingling. which assembles 
Isuzu light trucks and minibus- 
es, has already sold 400 million 
shares through a private place- 
ment to international investors. 

The 500 million-share com- 
bined offer represents 25 per- 
cent of Qingling’s enlarged 
share capital and values the 
company at $535.7 million. 

One of the fund managers, 
who asked not to be identified, 
told Bloomberg Business News 
that the private placement had 
been oversubscribed. 


BANKS; Hong Kong Government Allows Rate-Setting Cartel to Continue 


Coatfamed from Page 11 
ys terns,” said Michael Cart- 
rnd, Hong Kong’s secretary 
or financial services. 

The Hong Kong government 
rill push banks to reveal more 
iformation about their balance 
heets and allow competitive 
ates for the deposits banks pay 
or fixed time deposits, now 
inly 4 percent of the overall 
long Kong-dollar savings mar- 
eL 

But the changes, announced 
a response to a Consumer 
'ouncil study of the banki ng 
ector, will have little effect on 
anks’ bottom line, analysts 
aid. 

Laura Grenning, an analyst 
rith Credit Lyonnais Securities 
a Hong Kong, said she wd- 
omed the government’s more 
tringenl disclosure require- 
aents on banks but said, “In 
■nns of impact on the banks’ 


performance, it’s a nonevent” 

Citing a study by Hong 
Kong’s Monetary Authority; its 
equivalent of a central bank, 
Mr. Cartland said there were no 
“compelling” reasons for full- 
scale liberalization of all inter- 
est rates now. 

The government said it 
would assess the consequences 
of removing a cap on fixed de- 
posits in 1995 before deciding 
upon greater liberalization in 
the marketplace. It effectively 
ruled oat substantial changes 
before 1997. 

“Contrary to popular belief, 
small depositors might be worse 
off, as banks would probably 
react by introducing additional 
charges and tiered interest rates 
in favor of larger depositors, as 
well as seating down on ser- 
vices,” Mr. Cartland said. 

“The pressure has been 
building up to see the govern- 


ment’s response,” said C.S. 
Chung, executive director and 
general manager of Wing Lung 
Bank LtcL, a prominent mid- 
sized local bank. “Our initial 
response is that the area of de- 
posits affected is quite small — 
the interest-rate agreement still 
stands.” 

Bui bankers will be forced to 
change their altitudes toward 
disclosure of their financial in- 
stitutions' true condi tion. 

Currently, among the accept- 
ed practices that make local 


banks’ balance sheets more 
opaque than those of their in- 
ternational rivals, Hong Kong 
banks can maintain so-called 
hidden reserves, which are se- 
cret to all but the Monetary 
Authority, and can make trans- 
fers to and from them without 
full disclosure. 

“It’s something that is bound 
to happen sooner or later,” Mr. 
Chung said of the move toward 
greater disclosure. “A lot of the 
bankers are now preparing for 
it.” 


Daimler Looks to Vietnam 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dapatches 

HANOI — DaimJer-Benz AG has told Vietnam it wants to 
set up a plant to assemble commercial vehicles and cars in Ho 
Chi Minh City, company officials said Tuesday. 

The proposal was mentioned during a company presenta- 
tion on mining equipment Monday, regional manager Siegh- 
ard Ebner said. 

The company planned to apply soon for a license for a 
joint-venture* plant with a Vietnamese partner. The company 
would produce as many as 10,000 vehicles — mostly trucks, 
buses and minivans but also 1.000 Mercedes-Benz passenger 
cars — after seven to 10 years, he said. 

The German carmaker said it would want to build a second 
assembly plant depending on how the market developed, a 
training center and sales and service centers. 

Although Daimler-Benz would have a Vietnamese partner, 
it did not plan to go in with either of the two local foreign- 
owned assembly operations, Mekong Corp. and Vietnam 
Motors Corp., Mr. .Ebner said. 

If its plans are approved, Mercedes-Benz would become the 
second German automaker to build cars here. Vietnam Mo- 
tors, a joint venture owned by Japanese. Philippine and 
Vietnamese companies, said last month that it expected to 
begin assembling BMW luxury cars at a plant in Hanoi by the 
end of the year. (Reuters, A Pi 


LAND: Hong Kong Prices Rise 


atoned Iron Plage II 

roup, China Travel Ser- 
oup and Hong Kong's 
i Development Co. 
ial efforts to curb the 
; rampant lan d prices 
epected to drag prices 
0 percent from record 
sacned at an auction for 
r site in March, 
rend toward firmer in- 
aies and expectations 
: government may soon 
attention to the spiral- 
imercia] -property mar- 
■ been dampening inves- 
iusiasm at government 


were lower than expected be 1 
cause 12 property companies 
had derided not to bid against 
each other. They instead used 
the auction to display their 
muscle, 


TRANSPACIFIC FUND 

SodCtl Aoonymc 

Slice social: Lnxemfoonre. 14, roe AJdringen 
Regime ae Commerce: Luxembourg Section B n° 8-576 

DIVIDEND ANNOUNCEMENT 

The shareholders aie hereby mformed that the Annual General Meeting of 
July 26th. 1904 has approved the payment of a dividend of JPY 150 per 
share. • 

The shares are queued ex-efividend as from Jdy 27th. 1994 raid the divi- 
dend will be payable as from July 27th. 1994 against presentation of coo-, 
pon n a 23 at the following banks: 

- BANQUE DE NEUFLlZc SCHLUMBERGER, MALLET 
3. Avenue Hoche. PARIS Same 

- ABN AMRO BANK 

597. Herengiacht - AMSTERDAM 

- MEES & PIERSON N.V. 

54a Herengracht - AMSTERDAM 

- BANOUE GENERALE DU LUXEMBOURG 
14. rue AJdringen - LUXEMBOURG 

- SOCIETE BANCA1RE JULIUS BAER (SUISSE! SA. 

2. Boulevard du Theatre - GENEVE 

The Board of D rectors 


INDOSUEZ HIGH YIELD BOND FUND 

Sociele d’lnvestissement a Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 39, Allee Scheffer 
L-2520 Luxembourg 
ILC. lurmbonrg Bi 48-962 


NOTICE TO THE SHAREHOLDERS 

ThU is lo inform ihr slinrrhoWrrs of llir INDOSDEZ IIH>H 1 1KI.fi 
ISOM) FUND Sirav Ihm the Hoard of Directors held on July 22. 

has decided to pay a dividend of USD 4 per share to the 
holders of Distribution Shan*#. 

This wilt apply lo shareholders of record July 26. IWt. payable 
August 8. IWt. The shares will go er -dividend on July 27. I < WL 

The Board or Director*. 


I Investor’s Asia 

Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

Singapore Tokyo 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


13000 

2500 - • • 

23000— 


120001 

2400 * 

21000 

yw 

iiwoy • 

2300*1 -M 

/U 



a - p 

V* 19000 Jf—L- 


9000 -rV 1 

S if 2100 - U- 

18000 



1984 1994 

«rjj xm ruir 

1994 

mTj 

Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday Prev. 
Close Close 

% 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9,194.36 9.174.62 

+0.22 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2,206.04 2,212.26 

- 0 . 2 e 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries 

2,041.30 2,048.30 

-0.34 

Tokyo- 

Nikkei 225 

20345.40 20.297.70 

+0.24 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,008.31 1,004.38 

*0.39 

Bangkok 

SET 

1.34&50 1,348.06 

-0.12 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

935.20 339.12 

-0.42 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,727.22 6,634.22 

+1.40 

Manila . 

PSE 

2,728.53 2,771.51 

-1.55 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

454.36 455.12 

-0.17 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,020.35 2,021.79 

-0.07 

Bombay 

National index 

1,953.66 1,942.91 

+0.55 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Inicnuiiritiil UrraM Tfit'mit 


Very briefly: 


• Coles Myer LtdL, the biggest retailer in Australia, and Rank 
CommerrisJ Ltd. of New Zealand dropped their hostile takeover 
bid for Foodiaiid Associated Ltd. 

■Telekom Malaysia BbtL’s pretax profit rose 12 percent in the first 
six months of the year, to 788.8 million ringgit (S304 million). 

• Japan's leading economic index fell to 60 points in May from a 
revised 72.7 points in April but remained ab we the 50-poim level 
that signals economic expansion for the fifth moiuh. 

• rhwiB fined a Beijing branch of Kentucky Fried Chicken 1.000 
yuan ($115) for falsifying staff income reports to understate 
employee income. 

• Vietnam plans to raise the price of electricity starting in August 
to keep consumption from outpacing power-plant development. 

• President Enterprises Corp. earned 1.65 billion Taiwan dollars 
($62 million) before taxes in the first half of the year, up 51 
percent from the 1993 first half, helped by higher sales. 

• Ishikawapma-Harima Heavy Industries Co. plans to merge one of 
its B razilian units with Emaq-Verobne Estaleiros SA to form one 
of the largest shipbuilders in South AM eric a. 

• Keppd Bank of Singapore Ltd. plans to finance a hotel, shopping 
and entertainment complex in Singapore for 480 million Singa- 
pore dollars ($318 million). 


Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP 


Tsingtao Chief Steps Down 


Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — The chair- 
man and general manager of 
Tsingtao Brewery has resigned, 
and the company said he want- 
ed to pay more attention to his 
work as secretary of Tsingtao's 
Communist Party committee. 

Tsingtao, China’s largest 
beer maker, whose shares are 
listed on the Hong Kong Stock 
Exchange, said Zhang Ya Dong 
had found the workload of his 
many responsibilities to be too 
heavy. 

The new chairman will be Liu 


De Yuan, a former head of the 
Qingdao municipal bureau of 
mechanical works and officer- 
in-charge of the Qingdao Mu- 
nicipal Economic Commission. 

Tsingtao’s new general man- 
ager will be Shao Rui Qi, a 
senior engineer who was direc- 
tor and general manager of an 
affiliated brewery. 

Tsingtao said Mr. Zhang had 
made important contributions 
in the reorganization of the 
company leading up to its list- 
ing in Hong Kong a year ago. 


International 

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• Monday 

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Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in international Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

ftcrallCSSribunr 


opers have obviously 
lutious about o ffering 
js because the govem- 
made dear that there 


are going to see any 
upaway prices at land 
in the foreseeable fu- 

ien of Asia Equity raid 

,ugh the price fetched 
renunent auction in dj- 
aad for low-rise devet- 
as still strong, "it is not 
mgji to stimulate the 

ras the first auction 
government took steps 
[h io slow the ragmg 

Hong Kong's proper- 
ty banning the resale 
shed apartments and 
, more land for devel- 

ivas less certain after 

: sale was the impact 
-eck’s changes to the 
ules. which were de- 
prcvenl the sort of low 
ig that went on at the 
auction in May. 
is said the prices then 


On September 5th, the IHT will publish a Special 
Report on 

Aviation 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Developments of the GE90, a new aircraft engine. 

■ Future of mergers and acquisitions in the industry. 

■ Importance of the Chinese market in aircraft sales. 

■ Privatization of airports. 

■ Secrets of success for the European charter industry. 


This Special Report Mindctes with the Fambonxjgh Air Show, September 5-11. 
For more information about this Special Repot, 
please contact BiB Mahder in Paris at (33-1) 46 37 93 78. 

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t < iwunminii me « 4 

Hcraio^i^ItonDitnc 







Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERAT I) TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


AD VERTISING SEC TION. 


DUBAI 







Multimillion-Dollar Shopping Center 
Owes Success to Innovation and Service 



top-level team of 
Irishmen and an 
international staff 
of more than 500 
led by Colm 
IcLoughlin have helped to 
create in Dubai one of the 
most talked-about airport 
duty-free shops in the world. 

Success has been largely 
achieved through positive 
diplomacy, commercial 
shrewdness and the undeni- 
able charm and sincerity of 
its general manager. 

If Colm McLoughlin, a 
quiet-spoken man from 
County Galway, had not 
been a complete failure as a 
young encyclopaedia sales- 


man in London, he might 
never have gone to Dubai. 
where he has been general 
manager of Dubai Duty Free 
since it began in late 1983. 

Mr. McLoughlin had also 
tried his hand at bus con- 
ducting. although his parents 
had wanted him to become a 
demist. As a student more 
than 30 years ago. he had 
gone to London to earn extra 
money for his university 
fees back in Ireland. 

But he was just not suited 
to selling or bus conducting. 
As a salesman he had 
covered the whole of Lon- 
don trying to persuade peo- 
ple to buy his encyclopae- 



Mohi-din Binhendi, who first 
conceived the idea of the duty- 
free shopping complex. 

dias. without any success. 

"I must have been the 
worst salesman in the 


world,'* Mr. McLoughlin 
says. Today he manages a 
sales empire with a turnover 
of more than $140 million a 
year. The route from frus- 
trated salesman to manager 
passed through a Wool- 
worths store in a London 
suburb, where he began by 
sweeping up the floors as a 
trainee manager. 

(t was a humble begin- 
ning, but nine years later, 
following a return to Ireland, 
he got a job as assistant 
manager at Shannon Airport 
duty-free shop, then one of 
the top duty-free operations 
in Europe. He became man- 
ager four years later. 


DCA Head Had Idea for Airport Shops 



he credit and in- 
spiration for the 
original concept 
for a duty-free 
complex must go 
to one of the emirate’s lead- 
ing young technocrats. 
Mohi-din Binhendi, director 
general of Dubai's Depart- 
ment of Civil Aviation 
(DCA). 

Mr. Binhendi, educated in 
the United States, is a man 
who likes to get things mov- 
ing, and when he visited 
Shannon Airport duty-free 
shop in 1983, he at once de- 
cide that Dubai had to have 
a similar operation to re- 
place its drab duty-free 
shopping counter. 


With the blessing of the 
ruling Maktoum family and 
the support of Sheikh 
Ahmed bin Saeed AI Mak- 
toum, president of the DCA, 
he set about creating the 
new complex. 

By December 1983, 
Dubai Duty Free was open 
for business. 

‘Turnover in our first year 
exceeded all our expecta- 
tions - $20 million - which 
equaled several of the long- 
established airport duty-free 
shops in other parts of the 
world,” Mr. Binhendi points 
out proudly. 

Mr. Binhendi. like Irish- 
man Colm McLoughlin. the 
man he chose to be his duty- 


free general manager, is 
something of a workaholic. 
When not sitting behind his 
desk, he can be found at 
meetings discussing new 
plans for the airport, or trav- 
eling the world seeking new 
ideas. 

When Dubai's airport 
shops first opened, about 3.5 
million passengers used the 
airport per year, of which 
2.5 million were departures 
or in transit. 

Today, the shops serve 
over 5.2 million passengers 
per year, and plans are under 
way to expand both the air- 
port and its duty-free shops 
to cope with the 10 million 
passengers that are expected 


to pass through the airport 
annually by the year 2000. 

Profit is not the main mo- 
tive in Dubai. Many goods 
are imported in bulk, often 
at preferential freight rates, 
and profit margins are low. 

“We want to pass on all 
the advantages to the cus- 
tomers,” says Mr. Binhendi, 
pointing out that this is why 
Dubai can offers some of the 
best-value goods in the 
world. 

“Give the customer the 
right product at the right 
price and in the right envi- 
ronment, and you can al- 
ways be successful. This is 
exactly what has happened 
here," Mr. Binhendi asserts. 


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Colm McLoughlin, general manager of the Dubai Duty Free 
shopping complex, with 1985 and 1986 International Duty Free 
awards. 




Chance, or maybe the . 
“luck of the Irish,” brought 
him to Dubai. Mohi-Din 
Binhendi, director general of 
Dubai’s Department of Civil 
Aviation, made a stopover in 
Shannon on his way to the 
United States. Always quick 
to recognize a good idea, he 
decided that Dubai should 
have a similar duty-free op- 
eration, and asked Mr. 
McLoughlin to put together 
a team and come to Dubai to 
investigate the possibility of 
opening a duty-free shop- 
ping complex. 

When the feasibility study 
was completed, Mr. 
McLoughlin, much to his 
surprise, was offered the job 
of establishing and manag- 
ing the proposed new opera- 
tion. He kept some of his 
original Irish team, includ- 
ing George Horan, now his 
deputy manager, and John 
Sutcliffe, who now manages 
the duty-free airport shop in 
Bahrain. 

They soon became known 
as the “Irish Trinity” and set 
about making a few miracles 
happen, working up to 20 
hours a day. The first new- 
style duty-free shops were 
set up in the only space 
available at the airport, an 
unused kitchen area. 

In the early 1970s, when 
the United Arab Emirates 
was created out of the old 
Trucial States (a British 
colonial protectorate), the 
then new Dubai airport ter- 
minal had a single counter 
selling duty-free goods. 

Mr. McLoughlin likes to 
relate the story of those early 
days when a friend went to 
the counter and asked for a 
bottle of Bells whisky. ‘No 
Bells," said the assistant “A 
bottle of J&B then," said his 
friend. “No J&B,” said the 
assistant, adding, “No 
whisky.” Today, well over 
600,000 bottles of whisky 
are sold annually in Dubai’s 
duty-free shop. Some 70 
percent of everything sold is 
purchased locally. 

One of Mr. McLoughlin ’s 
first jobs in the early days, 
after be had finished work at 
die airport, was to go down- 


town tc the souks and seek 
out local traders who would 
provide him with some of 
the goods on his duty-free 
shopping list. 

Dubai is in practice a 
“duty-free area,” and Mr. 
McLoughlin has always 
been at pains to establish 
good relations with the the 
local market. The airport 
duty-free shop provides an 
additional outlet for Dubai 
traders. 

Improvement, innovation 
and. above all, service to the 
traveling public are key ele- 
mems of Mr. McLoughlin’s 
approach to the duty-free 
business. 

He has revolutionized the 
traditional approach to duty- 
free operations by creating 
an entirely new environment 
for the 5 million passengers 
passing through die airport. 
Many of the airlines stop in 
Dubai late at night and early 
in the morning, and shop- 
pers usually have a maxi- 
mum of 30 minutes to visit 
the marbled halls of the 
duty-free complex. 

“We have strived to make 
Dubai a really pleasant place 
for visitors to snop. We nave 
plenty of space, with soft 
lighting that makes for a 
friendly atmosphere. Our 
staff are trained to be both 
courteous and knowledge- 
able about the products we 
sell. 

We are providing a ser- 
vice - one of the best, we 
hope - for airline shoppers 
as well as giving them value 
for money," says Mr. 
McLoughlin. He also points 
out that none of this could 
have been achieved without 
the support of his staff and 
of Mohi-Din Binhendi and 
Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al 
Maktoum, president of the 
Dubai Department of Civil 
Aviation. 

T have a very close work- 
ing relationship with my 
boss , and the people who 
make the policy decisions 
are right here beside me,” 
says Mr. McLoughlin, who 
now oversees an annual, 
turnover of mote than $150 
million. 


CONGRATULATIONS 

WITH 

10™ ANNIVERSARY 
OF 

DUBAI DUTY FREE 

FROM 





Growth of Shopping 
Complex Linked 
T o Local Economy 

ith its Sheltered deep-water creek, Dubai has 
been a major trading port for more than a centu- 
ry. Dhows moored five abreast were a common 

sight in the port until the eariy 1970s. They are 

still in use, but now have their own harbor. 

Free trade, under the guidance of the ruling Maktoum 
family, has been die secret of success for. Dubai, one ot tne 
United Arab Emirates. Its prosperity was founded on a thriv- 
ing re-export business. In 1970, before the high -rise con- 
crete and g lass banks, offices and hotels towered over the 
creek, it. was common txrsee bars of gold stacked by the side 
of a moored dhow, watched over by a bearded guard. 

Gold and Dubai have always been synonymous. Today, 
gold is the largest-selling item at the international airport's 
duty-free shopping complex, which just celebrated its 10th 
anniversary- Last year, it sold over two tons of gold, more 
than any other duty-free shop in the world (it also sells more 
Toblerone chocolate bars than anyooe else). . 

When ft opened for business in December 1983, few peo- 
ple would nave believed it- could achieve such success. 
Since sales reached $20 million in the first year of trading, 
the duty-free operation has rarely been out of the headlines. 

This year, its sales will probably exceed $150 million. It 
has achieved worldwide recognition from the tax-free indus- 
try and travel trade, and has won scores of accolades. It has 
now become one of the top three airport duty-free shops in 
the world, along with Amsterdam and Singapore. 

The inspiration for the shop came from a chance visit ear- 
ly in the 1980s by a young Dubai technocrat to the duty-free 
shopping complex at Irelands Shannon airport. Mohi-din 
Binhemfr, director-general of Dubai Department of Civil 
Aviation, liked what he. saw and decided on the spot that 
Dubai had to have the same service for the rapidly growing 
passenger traffic through his city airport. Little did he know 
that Dubai was to start a revolution in duty-free shopping 
presentation and service that was to be emulated throughout 
die Middle East and even farther afield Apart from being 
the first modem duty-free shopping complex in the Gulf, the 
Dubai operation has also been of key strategic value in pro- 
moting Dubai as a business and tourist destination. Last 
year, more than 1 million guests stayed in Dubai’s hotels, a 
15 percent increase over the previous year. Americans and 
Europeans accounted for nearly one -third of the total. 

“The promotion of Dubai is high on our list of priorities," 
says Cohn McLoughlin, the Irish general managerof Dubai 
Duty Free. “When. Mr. Binhendi first envisaged a duty-free 
facility, he saw ftas a service to passengers that would com- 
plement the other facilities al the airport. Over the years it 
has become a most efficient promotional tool for Dubai, and 
we are delighted to continue in this way. It is very satisfying 
for us to bear both our own organization and the United 



Participants in and supporters of the 14th World AbtineQott Tour- 
nament, held to Dubal and sponsored to part by Dubai Duty Free. 

Arab Emirates, spoken of in such an enthusiastic way all 
around the world. 

While the 26 shops in the marbled hall of the duty-free 
complex have gamed.an undeniable reputation for good val- 
ue, the duty-free marketing and sponsorship programs have 
greatly enhanced Dubai’s global image. The “Finest Sur- 
prise" luxury-car raffle, now in its fifth year, has been one of 
the complex’s most successful marketing innovations and 
has been coped by others around the world. Dubai Duty 
Free has sponsored the PGA Desert Classic golf champi- 
onship, international tennis, snooker and powerboat racing 
competitions and many other sporting events. Why does 
Dubai Duty Free get involved in sponsorship? Mr 
McLoughlin explains, “We do it for several reasons. Each 
time a race is won, a red is sunk, a blow is struck and a ball 
is hit, the name of Dubai Duty Free gets into 300 or 400 mil- 
lion homes around the worid. We do it for corporate Dubai " 
Together with other organizations, the duty-free operation 
helps ensure that Dubai is seen for what it is- one ofthe a 
places in the Middle East in terms of the quality of sod 
and business life. J 

se p in £ U P Middle East headquarters don'i 
usually look any farther than here,” Mr.McLoughlin says. 
But improving the shopping outlets and providing unpre£. 
dented service for the 5 million passengers who vie theat 

of ^ “» I* i"*r- 

By constantly reviewing product lines and adopting a “Us- 
ming . approach to customers, Dubai Duty Free tritl to ere 

nrct-Hnce tn it* ^ w cn 


sure first-dass service to its customers. This strategy ha* 
been rewarded, as witnessed by the dozens of accola&s tot 
complex faasraceived, begimung in October 1985 with Sc 
Rronber marketing awards for “operator of the vear” 

ed the best -duty-free shon th rfw utnru .v _ . . .. 



award-winning proq^o^d^SM^ 

McLoughlin: “When Mdhi-din BinhetSil^'S*? 

ftee shops in 1983, he had very 

Ten years later, we can say that, as a rrairnF oqgcnvea 

team effort, we have achievedmanv of 

: However, the message for ^uSKfe^t^n 

Sg&F our position in the maketpiace and^ 

ait^rtwill have bcen^|^X n ^ B a ~>ona 
duty-free complex capableofmovidina 
pected JO million passengere^S ? * 
n s airport in the coming decade^ 1 ** ustn l 









Cofan McLoogh Bn 

General Manager, 
Dubai Dury Free. 


• WB AI^OTY PUtt i'v 
SPONSORED EVENTS 

IfU 

Mosta Snooker Tournament 

19*9 

Bahai Saooker Onsnr 
WCC Stogies Iannis Gwrapioaship 
• 1990 ‘ 

Babul Smoker Classic 
Worid Karate Qompwnshlp ■ 



1991 

Dubai Smoker Gassc 
Avtatien Cop :1st Men's Stogies Open 
Tennis Toawmnt 
International Offshore Powerboat Race 

1992 


Dubai Snooker Classic 
Worid Offshore Powerboat Omrepiansfaip 
Aviation Cop : 2nd Men's Staglss Open 
Tennis Totmwmait 



en year* ago, jno one expected (Dubai (Duty 0ree lo b ecome one of ike worlds lop three July ftee operations. 
Sfoday,: -ill has Seldom been out of iheheaJlines. ^ - ofales al ike end of 1QQ3 were $ 13 2 million — a 435 P er 
cent increase; over iA j first frdlr years trading! (Dubai (Duty (free has not only revolutionized ike style of duly free 
c^cdions in lke :(Yi%uldle Sasi, it lias set new standards of presentation and services for ike lax free industry world- 
wide j(Dubai ^tdy^r^has played. a key role in promoting (Dubai as a unique business and tourist destination 
wftli-ihe sponsoring df a host of wofld class sp •orling arid leisure events. Qke promotion of (Dubai is kigk on our 

... v ; 7/. -• .{ ; . . ’ 7 . 

10 {qf priorities,’ saijs 6olm, QTlcJ^ougklin, who has been general manager of (Dubai (Duly Sree since its inception. 
'When QfYir, Q^o/rf-Gta SSinkendi, director general of (Dubai (Sivd (Aviation, first envisaged a modem duty free facil- 
iiy al (Dubai, s he also saw , it as a service lo passengers lo complement ike other facilities offered al ike airport, 
©ver the years & has. become a most efficient promotion tool for (Dubai Qnd were delighted to continue in this uniy. 


1993 

Dubai Tennis Open ATP Sanctioned 
Worid Anfioe Goff Toomaraent 
Daboi Snooker Classic 
Wodd Offshore Powerboat CkmpwRshjp 
Aviation Cup : 3rd Men's Stogies Opw 
Tennis Tooroomeot 


Gif ! s from Dub-ni 


1994 

DiibcH Tennis Open ATP Sanctioned 
DDF Cep Creek GoB dub 


Duboi^nnid Prtx. 

Awrffea Cup: 4* Men's Stogies Open 


Doty Free Saf World Cbp 



Frontier Marketing Awards 
Best madcefeg ampoigo far a rrtrdar - emner 
in 1999 
Pak-fnmrtas Forma 
Aend hr industry— best doty free 
Od 1989 

Business Traveler Readea Pol 
Best duty frae worldwide— 2nd 

Middle East Economic Digest Baades Suvey 
Best GCC duty fiee -winno 

Od 1988 

Frontier MnkatingAwwi: 

Render of the year 
-ieghly commended 

Business Traveler Readers Pofl 
Best duty free woddwide- 2nd 

Mxkfe Bet Economic Digest Reorfeo Survey 
Best GCC daty free - raw 

Od 1987 

Froofe Mukafog Awards 
Airport Arty free operator of the year 
-highly amended 

Business Traveler Reodec M 
Best duly free wddwfe-2 nd 

Od 1986 

Frontier Marketing farads 
Best nabttog campaign 
for 0 defy bee operator -winet; 

Duly free person of the yea 
(Cohn Mdoughfinl - winet. 

Od 1985 

Frontier Marketing Awards 
Anport dutyfree 
operator of Ihs year - waner ; 

Bast mariatsg ampogn 
for 0 dirty free operate- highly commended. 


lw 

1BSS - ions 10TH ANNIVERSARY 

3Icralb3£Irlbunc, 
















I 








Page 18 

ADVERTISING section 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


ADVERTISING SbCjjW 


DUBAI 


Airport: Sixty 
Years of Growth 


ince the first British Imperial Airways flying 
boats landed on die creek in Dubai in the 1 93&i 
^*4 en route from Europe lo the Asian subcontinent. 
Siiiam Dubai has become a major transit point between 
West and EasL 

The growth of its airport ami aviation services reflects its 
increasing prosperity as the commercial and aviation cross- 
roads of the Gulf. When the first modem airport opened in 
1960 with a single 3.U00-meier runway, the terminal could 
handle only 1 5(f passengers at any one time. 

Ten years later, the situation was transformed by the open- 
ing of a new S3.! million terminal that could accommodate 
1.500 people. When the duty-free shop started in 1983. ap- 
proximately 140 planes were landing and taking off daily, 
and 3.57 million passengers passed through the airport dur- 
ing the year. 

More than 5.2 million passengers used ihc airport’s newly 
extended terminal building and other facilities last year. 

The airport is also the home base for the UAE’s own 
award-winning airline. Emirates, which first took to the 
skies in 1 VS5. Emirates has expanded rapidly and is now a 
truly international airline, serving more than 30 destinations: 
it has set new standards in comfort and serv ice far its passen- 
gers. 

According to Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum. 
president of die department of civil aviation and chairman of 
Emirates. 7 million passengers are expected to use the air- 
port by the end of 1997. and 10 million at the turn of the mil- 
lennium. 

“Much has been achieved in the 32 years since Dubai Air- 
port began as a lonely desert landing strip. Today, it is one of 
the world's best airports, because we devote great attention 
to providing top-quality service for all our customers - pas- 
sengers. airlines, cargo agents and cargo shippers,” says 
Sheikh Ahmed. 



An Aladdin’s 


opeoea-ai tne.enu m ».* r T.: 

grofKd taX'free5lro^hg-in die Gulf that even des*. n l 

SgitwasififScuIt ' - • . . .. ,, 

' • ..An ^extravaganza -of exc'efleriee or- a "^eniabw 

werejusrtwouF the most quoted phras- 
es' fa describe this reyofutibn in airport shopping. 
J.L* fWhu uihKin a vhnn. 


Now Dubai is planning an even bigger and more sophisti- 
cated airport which it hopes will serve its needs well into the 
next century. The unusually rapid growth of tourism in 
Dubai is another factor that the airport has to lake into ac- 
count 

"This is becoming very active as we are trying to encour- 
age people to come here, and it is now beginning to pay off. 
We are forecasting between 7 and 8 million passengers for 
the airport by 1997,” says Mohi-Din Binhendi. director gen- 
eral of the DCA. 

He adds. “We are planning some very extensive develop- 
ments for the future new airport. We want it to be clean and 
spacious. We want it to be an ‘easy' airport for passengers, 
with as little hassle as possible.” 

Mr. Binhendi *s dream is to create what he calls the “five- 
minute airport." The proposed new $500 million airport ter- 
minal will have 56 departure gates and the latest security 
technology. “We want an airport where security, immigra- 
tion and "check- in procedures are minimal but are still, of 
course, effective, and where service is first class.” 

“If we can find the solutions, we will become the fastest 
airport in the world.” Mr. Binhendi says. 



V-ITte-.br&al shops have changed over the years to 

demands and needs. New 
shopShave been bulk and old ones inodenured ur re- 
■ iurbisbeef with special displays to bring a Iresh look to 


; '• ;‘r> -v? United Arab Emirates 
; • ; • . *V 2 V & the yeorld'S top 


m 1 .,*-' ."A t ‘-r. 

. " V.'vn it* 

v- . y, «**/*. us*’. ~ ‘-v ' 

* 


: .Thert^ r s-jn^ earfrahce Is by way of* an escalator 
* fo^diertimrtd^xuture terminal; from which raiop- 
^ perk' fr&vt. wew of the gleaming counters 

i KnboleK Italian eold iew- 


nr- 


Ultramodern faculties at Dubai International AirportilO mSUon visi- 
tors per year are expected to land here in the year 2b00. 


■■'WVW . X“*«**«e . j/wwki . C*" .■ er 

. • '-T$pne;.s$leis A packed .electronics arid domestic 
■'equipment, outlet, including -cameras and computers. 
Ort ^o&er 1 $ a bustling food store. which has grown 
ss^ii6pantly ,trifer the years. Surprisingly, nuts, milk' 

and sjtecial hunjkJi- 




' *.N- *> ■ K 



.mm*™* • * 


Sports Program: Events 
Range From Snooker to 


warn.-*. ' 

.... .v.-, 

’i ■* - 


)LF 


wm& 


g SB^a s part of the 
“Corporate 
Dubai” image. 
& 2 &M Dubai Duty Free 
has been diversifying its ac- 


tivities into sports sponsor- 
ship since the mid-1980s. 
“We became involved in a 






wide range of events, includ- 
ing football, basketball, rug- 
by. ice hockey and water 
skiing." according to Cohn 


McLoughlin, general man- 
ager of Dubai Dutv Free. 




Awards ceremony for the Dubai Tennis Open. 


ager of Dubai Duty Free. 

In 1988, the first interna- 
tional event, the Dubai Duty 


Free Masters Snooker Tour- 
nament. was staged. The 
tournament has now become 
one of the world’s biggest 
snooker events to be held 
outside of Britain, with prize 
money totaling more than 
$300,000. 

The duty-free organiza- 
tion’s most recent presti- 
gious event was the 1994 
Dubai Tennis Open champi- 
onship. now in its second 
year. 


This year’s event, jointly 
sponsored with BMW, was 
held at the Aviation Club 
Tennis Centre in February 
and attracted many of the 


world’s top players, who 
competed for 51 million in 


ill 


competed for 51 million in 
prizes. 

The top prize of $144,000 


went to Sweden’s Magnus 
Gustafsson. ' vho defeated 
the Spanish player Sergi 
Bruguera 6-4 6-2 before a 
packed cente -court crowd. 

Other major sporting 
events sponsored by Dubai 
Duty Free include the Duty 
Free Cup Cre k Golf Course 
in July, the S looker Classic 
in October, t le Grand Prix 
World Ofifsht: re Power Boat 
Race Champi jnship lU.I.M. 
Class 1) in November,, the 
Dubai Aviatit n Cup ’94 ten- 
nis toumamei l also in No- 
vember, and he Dutv Free 
Golf World CUp *94 event in 
December! ’ -V 

AH these dvents are ex- 
pected to draw; a large num- 
ber of international sports 
fans. 




mtur 






jssssaw- - .v . mam&xji® 




■ 





The fe*$ry 

mnof^pBsatingetB InitmOUbat dtdy-tee stepping complex. 

'■ '-''i .. . s . ' « . ■_ . . .... 

■' Ttoe are alsd. secdoos-devdtod to toys, flic, latest. 
LfasWpqs,' ^jptwig. goods, ^Ds and 1 tapes. One of die 
bdssest counters « for fraOTarices isikf cosmetics. The 
: ckcof is in: sbff pastef shades designed to cxeate^i re- 
.. texed fflmpsphae foe travelers, jnrtnmlar(y.4hu>e in 
transit, who typically haVe only 30 minutes in the tei - 


w> ri»fce the’raail a 
mvpasmigprs. to -spendt&ri r’money, : 
m < JS3Mg;iiM6 taiyers,” says Cdm 
5i^Q(-free.^en^aI Thanagi^!.fo' 1987. • 

for 


Jof Rolls’- • 


Stephen Hendry, emriual winner at the Dubai Duty Free Snooker 
Classic S3, one of the world’s biggest snooker events. 


1989,- Tick- 
gtmted;tp'.l^XX)'per draw,' 
Wkltm theijEst week df :. . 


CONGRATULAnONS 






mm 


Ronald Cyprian D’Cunha of India, winner of a 
Mercedes Benz S 500 Coupe and two first class, 
round-the-world airline tickets in Dubai Duty 
Free’s 500th Finest Surprise. 

Dubai Duty Free’s Finest Surprise, now in it's fifth 
winning year, offers you the opportunity to win die 
world's finest cars at the world's finest Duty Free. 
Tickets for the cars are priced at Dhs. 500 (US$ 139) 
and are limited to 1,000 bonafide departing and 
transit travellers. The draw date and winning number 
is published and each participant is advised The car 
is shipped io the winner’s address free of charge. 
Tbejiaest coHeclios at the uvrhfs most ekgact doty free. 

JWk 


• Jashanma! National 
Company,, founded 75 
years ago as a general store, 
has expanded throughout the 
Gulf and is now a major dis- 
tributor of fragrances repre- 
senting more than 50 brands. 
Congratulating Dubai Duty 
Free on its success, Gangu 
Batra, chief executive offi- 
cer. says: “[The Dubai Duty 
Free staff is] tremendously 
productive, completely pro- 
fessional and manages to 
combine this with a friendly, 
personalized relationship 
with us suppliers. When our 
duty free sells more To- 
blerone bars than any other 
duty free in the world - al- 


most a million bars a year - 
without a doubt, everything 
is in place." 

• Congratulations from 
Mustafa Biu'AbduUatif, 
Dubai agents for Roth- 
mans of Pafl MalL “Dubai 
Duty Free certainly ranks as 
one of the best in the world. 
Its wide variety of beautiful- 
ly decorated shops offers the 
discerning traveler a bewil- 
dering choice, of merchan- 
dise at some of the best and 
most economical prices. A 
further attraction that has 
created considerable interest 
and has been an example for 
other duty-free outlets 
around the world to follow is 


west _ 

* iQ-reahsk at ■ * 

rW ffcay- . 


ms 





the foxury-car raffle. The from strength to strength. To 
choice of such an array of . all concerned with this suc- 
reasonably pneed goods; cessful venture: Well done 
combined with die possibili- . and the best of luck 1 " 
ty of warning a Porsche or a • Spinneys Dubai savs 
“*5 S 'The Dubai Duty Free & 


TXibai Duty Free' irresistible. 
We wish Dubai Duty . Free 
all the best for the coming 
years, and hope it will grow 




/3y 


‘With Orniptiments from 

Oswmieys 


the Dubai Duty Free has 
o©en instrumental in deter- 
mining Dubai as a free port 
worldwide. With its spon- 
sorship of various interea- 
???£ events, it has con- 
inbuted siffliificantlv toward 
putting Dubai on the world 
tounst map. The DDF shop- 
ping complex gives value 
^rmoney and offers quality 


^Leading brands of con- 


dair y products 

are ap- 
plied in bulk £n r»r»c vT 


For further information please caH Dubai (9714) 206-2433 or Fax (9714) 244 455 


CONGRATWATIONSI 

DUBAI WITT REES HNEST SIWWSt WINNEK 


308th Winflg j: MWOWWW tSSggS, 

SS^S.dS.IME. Iranian, from Diiai. UAE, Wnnnfi™ AbuDtabLUAE. 


PaastaaLfiom Dubai, UAE, Iranian, from Mai, UAE 

Porsche 91 Itinera car. BMW750iLcar. 


. , ■ 7 ' ■ uuiim, uuu rwuMiMn. u 

UAE, wmwa-of a zarai sflver winner of an Oxford gram 
Macedes Benz SL 500 car. BMW 850 Ci car. 


• FMCG Distribution 

• Supermaricet Retailing 

• Contract Catering/Shipchandling 

PO Box 677 Dubai UAE Tel: 04 374050 fax: 04 371210 


plied in bulk to the DDF by 
S^nneys Dubai. Success 

P«cenHn^ rDlmed fay ^ 2!J 

Mackintosh K ra f t 

FcS'rkS* 

Clarke 


SSSS-neorLbS! 


nationally renowned hi. Tr 
represented bv bran ? s 
the Dubaj Dut^ p^ ys 


1 








The program for the conference 
will focus on three key sectors: 
telecommunications, 

transportation anti energy. 


INVESTING IN NEW 
INFRASTRUCTURE FOR EUROPE 


SKADDEN 
ARPS 
SLATE 
MEAGHER & 
FLOM 


BERLIN 


NOVEMBER 3 & 4 

IfcralbS&ribunc 


For further information on the 
conference, please contact: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long AiTe, London WC2E '*JH. England 
Tel: (44 71) 83ft 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 83ft 0717 

















































































I 


rage 20 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


SPORTS 


Edging Braves, 
Expos Extend 
Lead in NL East 


7Jie .isjoaaiai Press 
A tiring trip around the bases 
by John Smoltz may have cost 
the Atlanta Braves m their Na- 
tional League East division bat- 
tle with the Montreal Expos. 

The Expos’ manager, Felipe 
Alou, is convinced; Smoltz ad- 
mits it helped end his night 
That coupled with a two-run 
triple by Menses Alou off Mark. 

NL ROUNDUP 

Wohlers in a three-run seventh 
inning Monday night in Atlan- 
ta, helped the Expos to a 6-4 
triumph over the Braves. 

The victory extended Mon- 
treal's winning streak to seven 
games — their longest of the 
season — and gave the Expos 
their biggest lend of the year 
over the Braves at 2% games. 
Atlanta has lost six of nine; 

Smoltz walked in the fifth in- 
ning and scored from first on 
David Justice's double, sliding 
in just ahead of the tag by Mon- 
treal's catcher, Darrin Fletcher. 

It gave the Braves a 4-1 lead, 
but the run proved costly. 

Smoltz gave up a one-out 
walk to Fletcher in the sixth and 
Wfl Cordero followed with his 
15th homer of the season. 

Dodgers IQ, Giants 5: Ramon 
Martinez cooled off Darryl 
Strawberry and surging San 
Francisco, pitching the visiting 



. ■ S'. r -< ' 


Los Angeles Dodgers to a vic- 
tory that stopped their season- 
high five-game losing streak. 

Eric Karros bomered twice, 
doubled and singled, driving in 
four runs as the Dodgers took a 
2 Vi-game lead over San Francis- 
co in the NIL West 

Malt Williams bit his major 
league-leading 37th home run 
for the Giants, who lost for only 
the third time in 15 games. 

The Giants were 9W games 
behind the Dodgers before ac- 
quiring Strawberry, making his 
first appearance against the 
team that released him May 25 
following his treatment for sub- 
stance abuse. 

Reds 7, Astras 4: In Cincin- 
nati, Kevin Mitchell homered 
twice, rallying the Reds to a 
victory over Houston that se- 
cured the Reds’ month-long 
hold on first in the NL Central. 

Mitchell wiped out deficits by 
connecting on both of his swings 
against Greg Swindell, and Bret 
Boone doubled home the go- 
ahead runs to give Cincinnati a 
two-game lead over Houston. 
The Reds have been in first place 
alone since June 21. 

Phillies 8, Martins 1: Cun 
Schilling, sidelined the past two 
months by injuries, allowed one 
unearned run in five innings for 
his first victory since last year’s 
World Series as Philadelphia 
won in Miami. 

Schilling last pitched in the 





• -■ v i •- 






Eiic Uay/Thc AsnctMed Pm 

Second baseman Chuck Knoblauch went airborne to throw Ivan Rodriguez of Texas out at first 1 h Minnesota’s 7-4 loss. 


majors on May 16. During the 
layoff he had a bone spur re- 
moved from his pitching elbow 
and underwent surgery on his 
left knee. The victory was his 
first since pitching a five-hit 
shutout in Game 5 of the Series. 

Mels 7, Canfi nab 1: Rico 
Brogna went 5-for-5 and Bret 
Saberhagen won his fifth 


j. 


•■*„**« 


fRi 


'•vJ 




SPllIT 

Or 


straight decision, leading New 
York in St Louis. 

Brogna, who had three sin- 
gles and two doubles and drove 
in two runs, has hit safely in his 
last 1 1 starts while batting J14 
(I9-for-37). His five hits tied a 
club record last readied by 
Howard Johnson in 1988. 

Pirates 6, Cubs 2i Denny 


Colts Make 
Faulk Richest 
NFL Rookie 


Marshall Faulk with the 

Indianapolis r unning hade 

coach. Gene Huey, 
during his first day of 
training camp with the 
National Football League 
team. Faulk, a former 
San Diego State star and 
the No. 2 draft pick, * 
signed a $17.2 million, 
seven-year deal with die 
Colts mi Monday, the most 
lucrative rtwkfe contract 
in NFL history. Faulk will 
receive a $5.1 mMon 
signing bonus and his total 
package eclipses the six- 
year, $14.4 iralKon deal 
signed by the top draft 
pick, the quarterback Dan 
Wilkinson, with the 
Cincinnati Bengali Faulk 
rushed for 4*589 yards 
and 57 touchdowns in three 
years at San Diego State. 


Neagle ended a string of poor 
starts and hit his first major- 
league homer, leading Pitts- 
burgh past visiting Chicago. 

Neagle, who had allowed 
nearly a run an inning in his 
previous four starts, pitched 
five-hit ball and struck out nine 
in seven innings. Dan Miceli 
pitched two scoreless innings 
for his second career save. 


Rockies 4* Padres 3: Andres 
Galarraga hit his 3 1st home run 
to help Colorado overcome an 

11-strikeout performance by 
Andy Braes in San Diego. 

Danny Sheaffer broke a 2-2 
tie in the seventh by leading ofi 
with his first homer of the year, 
hitting a 3-2 pitch from Banes 
into the left-field seats. 


3-Run Homer in 12th 
Puts Royals Past Chisox 


Rua Hntai/Thc Aaodtwt Pnsi 


The Associated Prea 

The fireworks returned to 
Kansas City's Kauffman Stadi- 
um, thanks to Bob Hamdin. 

Hametin’s three-run homer 
with (me out in the bottom of 
the 12th inning Monday night 
gave the Royals a 6-4 victory 

ALROUNDUP 

over the first-place Chicago 
White Sox and set off the fire- 
works, suspended since an aeri- 
al bomb exploded in the right- 
field bleachers on My 15. 

The Royals* manager, Hal 
McRae, was modi more dated 
over the fireworks on the field. 

"This could be the turning 
point," McRae said. "I think 
well get it done this time," 

The Royals’ third consecu- 
tive victory lifted them to two 
games over .500 at home for the 
first time this season and to five 
games over JSQO for the season. 
They still trail the White Sox by 
7 Vi games. 

"It was a must win and 
should give us some momentum 
for tomorrow,” McRae said, “I 
saw nothing but positives.” - 

The biggest positive was Ha- 


mdm’s homer, his 20th of the 
season and third in three games. 

“I was just -trying to get the 
run in from third and got a 
pitch I could drive,” said Ha- 
mdin, whose lowering hlast on. 
Roberto Hernandez’s first pilch 
just cleared the 410-foot mark 
in center field. It scored Dave 
Henderson and Wally Joyner, 
who both singled. . 

The White Sox took the lead 
in the top of the 12th when 
Ozzie Guinea doubled with one 
out and scored ontlm Karnes’s 
two-out single, 

Rangers 7, Twins 4: In Ar- 
lington, Texas, Jose Canseco hit 
his 27th home ran, leading Tex- 
as past Minnesota as the Rang- 
ers ended their four-game los- 
ing streak. 

Canseco broke out of a 2-for- 
18 slump with a 423-foot, solo 
homer in the fifth riming. Rusty 
Greer had a pair of RBI singles 
and two waus for Texas. 

Brian Bohanon won for the 
first time in the majors since 
July 15, 1993. He started in 
place of Kerin Brown, whose 
scheduled turn in the rotation 
was pushed back a day because 
of a stress fracture in his foot. 



By Heath A. Smith 


When the San Francisco Giants signed the outfidder tterryb 
Strawberry on June 19, it was a new start for a talented player and, 
for a team that was not ejected to need one this season. • 

SSncchis first gameas^^Mtod July 7, they are 12-3. ^ tih a 

Monday to the Dodgers, they ended a trine-game warning streak, 
been the longest in die NanooaJ League this sepon* ! 
- Strawberry, with the Giants, completed half a 
baseball memory lane, winning 2-of-3 against the ream that made • 
him the Gist player selected in the 1&3 m^'or-league draft the. 

New York Mets. ’ 

On Monday, he began the second half of his reunion tour, going, 
hitless in the 10-5 loss in. the first game of a ibxex-gpme senes; 
against Los Angeles, the ream that traded ton to the Giants. . 

But the right fidder wasn't as interested in memories as m the* 
future. With every victory, the Giants not only are one step closer, 
to being where they thought they would be ra the firs t hal f of uie. 
season, but the voices off those who questioned Straw berry V 
signing get more and more faint. 

“1 think it makes it caster for everybody,” said Strawberry abouC 
. his team's winning ways. "It makes it raster for the players, it makes- 
it easier for the poaches and it makes h easier for me manager when* 
die team starts putting pieces together. It just takes pressure off of. 
everybody when you can relax and perform Kke that ” * 

A relief from pressure is certain^ something he could use. ’ 

- A troubled player who hacTwrestled with, emotional and fioan- * 
dal problems in the. pas, he admitted to a substance abuse' 
problem in April, entered adrug-rehabiHtationprogram and was. 
released from the Dodgers 6a May 25. The Grants signed him? 
June 19 and, after he played briefly with the AAA Phoenix. 
Firebirds, the Grants brought him back to (he majors. * 

"I fed comfortable coming back tobascbalL” Strawberry said. ! 
“There were times when I thought! wouldn’t be retnraixig. It's just; 
nice to be back out on the add. I fed like Fm a part of the. 
winning. Fm included with everybody else.” 

^Arnving here I think has 'picked up everybody dse’s game," ! 
he added. ^Sometimes drat happens wbara player comes along, a . 
player who’s capable of bdgmg a team, who land of inspires the* 
other players. It just removes an dial doubt from other players’! 
minds, axtd they know they can do the job.” 

Injuries to key players hadravaged the Giants roster this year, ! 
and they had been under .506 tv most of the season. Their best* 
player, outfidder Barry Be ads, wbfle having a decent year often-; 
sivdy, was distracted by -the flfaesaof his father, Bobby Bonds,* 
who is fee gad by to o wn feverne^ ^ ; 

helps hS^foei ^th^^ra^mad^^^xencein this comeback. ' 
It hdps us m thmkH^maybehemade a difference and maybe we| 
made the right derisa®.” /' , » 


ran punch in t»&d^Th»'Seaaoa. With Strawbe^ they have 
beoomeOne off the' mpsfcpowexftd teams; in National League! 
history .IJbry wereibefiutest pairinNL history fo both reach 30v 
home runs cn"t£e season, and with Strawberry now’ 

in thc&aeap th^^aa&h&pftched mound. . ’ ■_ 

: “Barre moved wso spot; where he got Matty hitting 

behind bmii M ~su£ the pteawr Ptirtte^ *Barry is getting 

good pitches to hit hujfc^frgettittg good pitches to hit becousg - 
Dairy! is pnj t rxyuigj gp^ ; *. '* 

On Maoday, Wiffiams bit his ; 37th home run to take sole 4 
possession cf the nuwor-ldtgue te&dfor the first time this season. * 


while Bonds, is thirdbin the NL witlE3 1 . Together, Williams and 
Bonds have hit 16 homers m '’fee IS g/oaesdOot Stnrwberzy has 
been pa fee team. * r ' •***■ ’*• - * '- 1 
"Honwrimprodraaicmhaa increased tremoadously, espcdailjp 
since Sfraw ha&beeaJbcre” 5ind Baker. "You look at Barry, you 
look at Mii^ th«y*ve bc®Sici«MB6fc ^oto know th^ just* 

can't jatdxaritemu Batryte ro Martraw^v ... . '• 

Tfs Hke^ FredMcGriU hot year when he got to Atlanta," he’ 
added. ^AD of a snddra Tcny Pendleton got hoi, David Justice 
got hot and Fred was 1-ot” 

fit 15 games with th&Giants, Strawberry is batting .310 with 
two home runs, including a grand slam —his first since August 2 1 * 
1991, when he was with the Mets, — 13 hits and tl RBIs. 

The Giants (47-53) had steadily dosed the gap on fee Dodgers 
(49-50) -r - from 7% games back to 2ri — and have a chance to take' 
over f&st place qf the NL West, depending on the current series’ ■ 
More inqxjrtant to the Giants, though, is their sense of renewal,’ 
thanks, in part, to a guy starting over again. 

*9®*^®*^ ** bttux kdia*.” Baker ^ said. “Wbefeert 

irs Strawberry or not it rare locks like him that’s made the: 
difference;" 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


7 irs'N 


/them vhn rnt ikIt'* 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


MY TfQER, ir S&IS. iS RUNRWS 1&MP NJCE. . 
ms FUR 0»T MUST WMHWA-HIN PEBSPiRE. 

IT LE5 ON THE FUXA- SHOUl® THIS 9E CWSIW6D 
AS A PERMWCHT OJMteE CTftTiagT . 

PERWPS ME CDMSdSSS ITS OAOfS WB5E; 

OR. KMBE TT W HM TOO SNVJ& 

Wk.UE.WMT \r e KXT SUCMtf I NT tt WKt? 



















2'k3&- : -'»£•- '< -• 

- *:dvi. k -r.r >.'• .Jt-N-y rtfv: •-“ 







/l£g> 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


Page 21 


i 



3T 



sn’t Cricket 


England Aghast as Tram faptain Admits ^« ting Hall 

a tube of Bp salve in their 


By Barry James 

Iniemalicnai Herald Tribune 

AS for a handful of dust, 
England’s cricket - captain, 
Michael Atherton, is covered 

in dirt this week. 

Like the balls with which it 

is played, cricket has long had 
; its seamy side Even the leg- 
endary w. G. Grace — - who 
looked like a cross between 
an Indian guru and a Victori- 
an urine owner, and batted 
like a dream — “was a cheat 
on and off die cricket field,” 
: according to the writer C.P. 
. Snow. 

But Grace was a mere 
“player” — a professional By 
• dint of his Cambridge educa- 
tion, Atherton rates as a 
. “gentlemen” under the snob 
rules of the empire’s favorite 
, game, a division officially 
abolished as recently as'1963 
, but still present in me minds 
■ of many. Until Saturday, as 
one newspaper put it, Ather- 



Mr. Clean image was 
. signer stubble. 

During England’s disas- 
, trous test against South Afri- 
ca — disastrous for England, 
- that is, as South Africa won at 
* Lord’s for the first time in 59 
years — Atherton was ob- 
__ served through the sharp lens 
of a TV camera on Saturday 
~ to put his hand in his pocket 
ana then rub the ball before 
handing it to the bowler Dar- 
' ren Gough. A television com- 


pockets for just that purpose 
' (hair cal ana sun lotion make 
handy substitutes). The aim is 
to make the baB as shiny as 
possible cm one ride, and 
rough up the cither ride to 
increase spin. With a fast ball 
traveling at up to 95 miles 
(150 kilometers) ah hour, the 
question of spin is no laugh- 
ing matter. 

Questioned by the referee 
in the England-South Africa 
test; Peter J. Burge, Atherton 
explained that, on a hot and 
humid day, be had been dry- 
ing his fmgerg. The referee 
examined the baB and decid- 
ed that there had been no foul 
play. 

Atherton said he had not 
realized until after the day’s 
play that there had been such 
a “hoo-ha” over the constant 
replaying erf the video se- 
quence. And he confessed 
that he had scooped up some 
dirt from the pitch and pat it 
in his pocket to keep his fin- 
gers dry, although he had not 
told Binge that. He added 
that he had not transferred 
any of the dirt to the ball, and 
he vehemently denied being a 
cheat. 

Nevertheless, Raymond B- 

Trn g wnrth j the chairman ci the 

England cricket relection 
body, fined Atherton the max- 
imum of £1,000 (51,530) “for 
using dirt to dry his fingers 
and £1,000 for not telling the 
match referee the full story.” 

Although : bowlers have 
never' 


naentaior, Tony Lewis, spot- irig their swratypahns i 

had the video sou — many do — Atherton’s 


- ted the move, 
replayed and made a joke 
about “Aladdin's lamp.” 

* The assumption was that 

- Atherton had infringed Sec- 

- don Five of the international 
cricket rules on Changing the 
Condition of the Ball by ap- 
plying an artificial substance 

. to its surface. 

* Members of the bowling 

. side have been known to keep 


apparent surreptitiousness 
was considered to be, well, 
n ot o mte cricket 

“Tbe action (rf having dirt 
in his pocket in order to dry 
his hinds was foolish in the 
extreme and cannot be con- 
doned, particularly when 
done by a test captain,” 
Burge said. 

“The fact that Atherton 


misled an ICC referee by not 
giving a full and Bank disclo- 
sure when given the opportu- 
nity to do so concerns me 
more because of the effect on 
the image of cricket,” he add- 
ed. 

- Many, including the crick- 
et greats Doris Compton, 
Geoffrey Boycott and Jona- 
than Agnew, called on Ather- 
ton to resign or be fired. 

“If the captain of En- 
gland’s cricket team fails to 
uphold the values of his soci- 
ety,” The Times erf London 
intoned, “he is unworthy of 
that uncornmonhonor, which 
the captaincy represents. He 
should be replaced.” 

A Conservative member of 
Parliament, David Wilshire, 
suggested that the pockets of 
cricketers be sewn up. After 
two members each took 
£1,000 recently to raise ques- 
tions in Parliament, some 
think that would be a good 
rule for politicians, as wdL 

Meanwhile, they’re laugh- 
ing all the way to the Punjab 
over Atherton’s discomfiture. 

Two years ago, the Paki- 
stani bowler Safraz Nawaz 
unsuccessfully sued Allan 
Lamb, an FrigHsh batsman, 
for fibd after he accused the 
victorious Pakistani team (rf 
tampering with the ball The 
assumption put forward by 
the more jingoistic elements 
of the London press was that 
Pakistanis may do that sort of 
filing, but upstanding En glish 
gpmtlpman, never. 

The Pakistani bonder Im- 
ran KHan admitted in a book 
that he had once t am pered 
with a ball and said this was 
“common practice” in county 
and international cricket. Re- 
ferring to Britain’s toniesl 
educational establishments, a 
friend chided Mm: “And to 
think you went to public 
school and Oxford!” 

“Where do you think I 
learned it?” Khan replied. 


Barcelona Adds a 3d Virtuoso 


Iniernatkwol Hendd Tributte 

L ONDON — “Johan CruyfT wanledHagi, 
and ndw we’ve goThim.” 

Those words, delivered with the air of a Latin 
shrug, tdl us why a soccer transfer called off on 
Sunday was consecrated on Monday. , . . 

J What Johan wants, Johan usually gets. He saw 
Gheoighe Hag, • 

the dark, rear- Rob •f " • 

khng little Ro~ u..nhno 
maman, disperse Hughes 

inspiration like — . - . 

• dew drops on this summer’s arid World Cup. 
Coach Cruyff determined he would have Hagi 
for his talent pool at Barcelona FC 
Good choice. You or l playing make-belief, 
would surety put Hagi, Hnsto Stoichkov, Ro- 
mArio and Roberto Baggio as automatic stanezs 
in our best 1 1 of 1994 World Cup stars. 

Cruyff now has three of than. Baggjo, the 
property of Juventus of Turin, is probably be- 
yond price, and anyway, he was run into the 
ground by Italy during USA 94. Who knows 
when he will be free of pain in his damaged right 
kniw , hamstring and heel? 

For roughly a third of Baggio’s $20 million, 
value, Cruyff has acquired Stoichkov, RomArio 
and Hagi. 

They are virtuosos. Their skill is a beholders 
dream. But the management gamble in bringing 
tfwn together, in risking $1 mill i on salaries for 
their exquisite twrhniqnes but questionable tem- 
peraments, is Cruyff’s burden. 

Cruyff’s heart failure is history. He seems to 
draw on volatility, on risk, as once he drew on 
nicotine. The temperaments, the clashing egos of 
the dressing room, fuel him. 
tfitoichkov, Romirio and Hagi are Latins. 
Their touch and invention are a joy, their moods 
can swing like the deviL But so could Cruyff’s 
when he was a star player. 

When he was less trusted by Barcelona than he 
is now, Cruyff bought Stoichkov, a player ticking 
away toward self destruction. Stoichkov was a 
wild spirit that the Bulgarian Army couldn’t uwne 
and the Bulgarian soccer federation harmed. 

S PAIN soon discovered his errant side. Cruyff 
was considered to be out erf Ms mind when he 
stood by Stoichkov after the Bulgarian had 
stamped petulantly on a referee’s toes. 

Cruyff may speak with a disciplinarian s 
tongue. But he may as well say Vesunus win 
never erupt again as claim that Stoichkov has 
thrown his last tantrum. . . 

Yet all of us witnessed Stoichkov at 


We also saw Rom&rio in incomparable scoring 
- imc nrone to intemperate spasms th an 

sSdcov, Romirio was the catalyst in Brazil s 

IfSSSSMK 

of cash. Romino was as big a 
blending mischief 

them np almost 

as rivals. r»me out rf it as 

- Yet he made them gel lo one 

Wends, temporarily at 8 odfaU,cr 

another's children. . . . - Soanish in- - 

-Stoichkov and Romano tad 

tqmational team playj^, Now they 

Ronald Koeman, working “ an ‘ 

have Hagi. 


FJA Bans Schumacher for 2 Grands Prix 


Confided by Oar Staff From Dispauha 
PARIS — Michael Schumacher, the 
world Formula One championship lead- 
er, was suspended for two races by auto 
racing’s world governing body on Tues- 
day for breaking the rules at the British 
Grand Prix earner this month. 

The International Automobile Feder- 
ation, FJA, also slipped a $500,000 fine 
an Schumacher's team, Benetton, “for 
faiEng on several occasions to obey the 
instructions rf the o fficials ” at the Brit- 
ish race on July 10 at Sdvcrstone. 

TWo other driven, Rubens Barri- 
chello rf Brazil and Mikka Hakkinea of 
Finland, were given one-race suspended 
bans. But Damon HSU, Schumacher's 
closest pursuer in the championship, 
was cleared of any rule breaches. 

Schumacher, a German, may stiD 
mmpgtf; Sunday in the German Grand 
Ptix at Hockenheim if he lodges an ap- 


peal, which would automatically sus- 
pend the ruling, said FlA’s president. 
Max Mosley. 

Schumacher and Benetton were also 
disqualified from the SD verst one race 
and the German driver was stripped rf 
the six championship points he had 
gained by finishing second behind HUL 

Schumacher was punished for ignor- 
ing a black flag order to stop after he 
overtook Hill illegally during the warm- 
up lap that preceded die race. 

“As a defense, be said he didn’t see 
the flag because of the sun,” Mosley 
said. “I can understand a driver not 
seeing the flag, but then it’s up to his 
team to tdl him qq the radio to come in 
by the next lap.” 

Schumacher made no comment Tues- 
day after attending the FIA disciplinary 
hearing in Paris. 


Despite the penalty imposed on him, 
SrhnmarhfT remains far ahead in the 
driven* championship with 66 points. 
H01 has 39. 

Hill collected a British flag from a 
spectator on the slow-down lap after 
winning but he was not punished after 
he proved that he had slowed down but 
not stopped, FIA stud. 

The one-race bans on Hakkinen and 
BarricheUo were suspended for three 
races. The pair collided on the final 
bend of the race and Hakkinen overtook 
another car on the formation lap. 

FIA said it had suspended the rulings 
due to “extenuating circumstances” and 
would erase them u the drivers did not 
break the rules ggpin during the next 
three races. 

The director rf the British Grand 
Prix. Pierre Aumonier. was stripped of 
his license for one year for failing “in his 


duties with regard to various points." 

FIA also asked the British Grand Prix 
organizers to conduct a full investiga- 
tion into the arms and take necessary 
measures to avoid any recurrence. 

Schumacher's absence . from the 
Hock enh rim Grand Prix would be a 
blow to the race’s promoters, who have 
reportedly sold 150,000 tickets. 

Schumacher has won six of the right 
races so far this year, coming in second 
in Spain due to a stuck fifth gear and 
because of the penalty at Sfiverstone. 

Benetton was fined an additional 
$100,000 for faffing to make its comput- 
er source codes available to officials 
after a challenge to the electronic sys- 
tems on Schumacher's car at the San 
Marino Grand Prix. 

McLaren was fined the same sum for 
the same reason. (Reuters, AP) 


Cruyff is the most restless, the most demand- 
ing, coach in the game. He is risking nothing on 
.ability —mose breathtaking Hagi curled- 


Hagfs; 

left-foot free kicks and his orchestration rf the 
imperious victory over Argentina were evidence. 

Hagi, with Ms appreciation of space and tim- 
ing, with Ms canning to know when to hold the 
baU in the caress rf Ms left foot or to release 
teammat es like diots from a sling, can compli- 
ment Stoachkoy and Romirio. 

He already speaks enough Spanish to mix it up 
with them. At 29, he has the woridhness rf a 
player who began representing his nation abroad 
at Ac age of 15. 

T HE questions are not to do with quality. 

They are in the mind and the heart of Hap, 
the wfihngness to be accepted among artists 
rather than play on the pede&al among artisans. 

Think where he is coining from. A few months 
ago, flabby around the waist and apparently 
letting the game pass Mm by, he strolled the 
midfield for Brescia in Italy's second division. 

I saw Mm at Wembley in March, a lost soul, or 
so it seemed. In a stadium only a quarter frill, 
playing in the recently exhumed Eaglish-ItaHan 
Cup. He walked, he seldom ran; yet, when he 
stirred, he still was a class apart. 

Two weeks later, Romania suspended Hagi for 
two games after he spat at a Northern Ireland 
player in a friendly match. The World Cup 
transformed M™, and I believe him implicitly 
when he says there was special inspiration — a 
drive among players who represented Roma- 
idy fit 



Arar Dedov Ream 


MheheH Bursts Past the Stars as Lewis Is4th in Goodwill 100 Meters 

Dermis Mhcbefl rf the United States raised a victory salute as he beat a star- bolder, who was second in 10.1 1, and Jon Drummond, right, was was third in 10.12. 
studded 100-meter field at the Goodwill Games in Sl Petersburg. Finishing in Carl Lewis, the A m e ri can former world-record holder and Olympic champion who 
10.07 seconds, Mitchell edged his compatriots Leroy Burrell, left, the world-record ruled the world’s sprint domain during the 1980s. came in a distant fourth in 10-23. 


mans 90 recent r 

Hagfs own liberation was personal. Few Ro- 
manians drove a white Mercedes around Bucha- 
rest as he did years ago, but few were the person- 
al “captives,” the pa athletes, rf the dictator 
Ceancescu. 

Hag and Nadia Comaneci shared that The 
son rf peasants, he was a prodigy known to and 
guarded by Ceaucescu when he was still a boy.. 

When the dictator fell in 1989, when Real 
Madrid first lured this “Maradona of the Carpa- 
thians” to Spain, freedom almost consumed him. 

Hagi dronlc too much and performed too Ettle, 
and in two years was on the shppery dope. Brescia 
rescued Mm because its coach, Mircea Lupescu, 
knew Hag’s worth and knew, from 72 appear- 
ances on Romania’s left wing, the demands. 

Lupescu surrounded him with two other Ro- 
manian exiles. The coach tolerated Hagi’s defect 
{intermittent brilliance) and gave him affection. 

I don’t know that Cruyff is into affection. 
Barcelona will grant more money than Hagi can 
spend — a thousandfold the laborer’s wage of Ms 
father, Iancn HagL 

Catalonia is a platform, a challenge fit for his 
phenomenal gifts. But it will extend Mm physi- 
cally and mentally. Hagi has coasted this far. He 
may find he has opted for a more fanatical 
calling even than that of Romania, where some 
would make him president. 

At Nou C 

and only then if he works. 

fteb Huffiest a* iStaag of WaTboks. 

■ lala® Pots Off Signing With Psdova 

Despite claims from the team that he was 
ready to sign, the U.S. defender Atari Lalas put 
off a dedaon Tuesday on joining the Italian 
soccer chib Padova, Die Associated Press 
reported. 

On Monday, the team announced that the 
defender would sign a contract at anews confer- 
ence Tuesday, making him the first American to 
play in Eruope’s most prestigious soccer league: 
Laias showed up for the conference, but rather 
tfra" agoing, he “promised to give the team an 
answer cm his decision by the end rf the week.” 
said GikJo Fattori, the team’s spokesman. 

Factor! said Lalas was still undecided because 
he had two other offers, from the German dub 
Bochum and the English team Coventry City. 








Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Bad Dtvtriea 



w L 

PC*. 

SB 

New York 

40 36 

425 

— 

Barttinera 

S4 41 

set 

SVi 

Baaton 

47 50 

AOS 

Uto 

Toronto 

47 50 

AS5 

13¥i 

DWrott 

43 55 

Ceosral Divtstae 

A3t 

18 

Chicago 

59 39 

M2 

— 

Ckvctand 

56 37 

sn 

1% 

Kansas aty 

52 47 

SB 

TYx 


46 52 

Aef 

n 

Milwaukee 

45 53 
WH7DMEM 

AS9 

14 

Tean 

47 52 

ATS 


Oeuand 

44 54 

A49 

TVs 

California 

42 58 

A2B 

5» 

Seattle 

40 56 

AM 

5V> 

•1 

P 



W L 

Pet 

SB 

«■ • * 

9VKNBIB m 

61 37 

422 

— 

Allonto 

59 48 

JW 

TA 

PhUattetatila 

48 53 

480 

14 

New York 

46 sa 

469 

15 

Florida 4S 54 

CeMra* DMDaa 

455 

Wfi 

Cincinnati 

58 40 

-592 

— 

Houatea 

57 43 

-570 

2 

PttMwrgh 

47 51 

480 

11 

St Louis 

46 52 

469 

12 

Chicago 

43 54 
MtDMSlM 

443 

141(1 

Ln Angeles 

49 50 

495 

— 

Colorado 

48 53 

473 

2 

San Francisco 

47 51 

470 

2% 

San Diego 

39 42 

386 

11 

Monday’s Line Scores 



Mortinn. WorreiJ (VI and Piazza. Haman- 
dar (9); Portugal. HieMrm Hi. Gomez (il, 
Frtv (9) and Manwartno. Rood (4). W—Mar- 
ltaK.t-7. L— Portugal. V-7. H Rs-Lns ARMtH. 
Karras 2 (11). San Frcmdsco. WHIIctto (371. 
BonzJoger («. 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

MONDAY'S GAME: Jordon wenil-for-5 In 
Ihe Barons’ >2 victory over II* Orlando Cute. 
Jontei struck nd m tnv cacond popped w> la 
flnt In Hw DIM. fllvd out to center In me 
seventh, grounded into a double play In the 
loth md had a boa! single In Hie nth. He had 
seven putouts In right held. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordon Is hlttlna 43- 
farvjsa (.us} with 2B runs. 13 doubles, one 
trtpta.31 RBIS. 17 wants, 84 strikeouts and 23 
stolen hoses In 37 attempts. 

Japanese Lea gu es 


Yomturt 

Yafcutt 

ChunkM 

Hanshln 

Hiros hima 

Yokohama 


ATLANTA— Acttvotwl Term Pendleton. 
INrdbascman.frocnl5day4soMedfltf;Knt 
kifMdcr Mfite MordecaJ to Richmond, il. 

NEW YORK — Put Pete Smith, ptteher. on 
I5dav disabled nst, retr umJ Ive hi July IB. 
Recalle d Jam Castillo, Ditcher, from Bkw- 
hantfon. EL. 

PHILADELPHIA— Activated Curt Schll- 
Hne, Pilcher, horn 15-day disabled list. 
BASKETBALL 


DETROIT— Acquired Ertc Leckner, cen- 
ter, from Philadelphia tor a secondrowid 
draft Pick in 1W4 or 1W7. 

SEATTLE— signed DeHef ScbremaL tar- 
wont to 5-V* 


FOOTBALL 


W L T Pet. SB 

47 32 8 MS — 

40 39 0 JDS 8 

« 40 0 JOO 81* 

39 43 0 jfH 10*4 

36 42 8 AO im 

35 43 0 Att 12Ml 


Konshin 8. Yam to rt 3 
Yakut! 4. Hiroshima s 
ChunlChl 1 Yokohama 2 


ARIZONA— Put Garrison Heaest running 
back, on physleoUv-unoble-to^ertamt-ilsL 

ATLANTA— S u spended Chuck smltn, de- 
fensive end lor 3 weeks. 

BUFFALO— Signed Mike Dumas, safety. 
Released Shown Lawson, defensive back. Re- 
moved Kent HulL center, tram physically 
unable ta- a orta i m-Usi. 

DETROIT— Stoned Lorry Thorpe, offen- 
sive tackle. 

GREEN BAY— Claimed Bob Brasher, tight 
end ea waivers tram LA Rams. Stoned Aar- 
on Taylor, offensive guard l»4-ysar contract. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Signed Marshall Faulk, 
nmtna back, to 7-year c ont ract. Agreed to 


AMERICAN LEAOUE 

m mi tn-4 7 1 

888 «n Tex— 7 12 • 

Brtcksaa, Trombley (7} and Parks; Bo- 
bonon, Whiteside (7), Oliver (9) and Rodri- 
guez. W— Bahama >8. L — Erickson, 8 -Ml 
S y-OBver (2). HRs— Minnesota. Munoz (10). 
Texas. Cc eis oc a (277. 

rWngi 888 IM ft* 881-4 H 0 

trnesei aty its m 888 mm is 8 

(12 femiaael 

MdSamefl. MeCaskH! OW. Hernandez 02) 
ana Lnvafliefe, Metvta (9); A ppier, Brewer 
(9). Pich ar do CM) and Mn tJu rlane . W— PC 
rtiardo. *3. L— Hernandez, J-*. HR — Kansas 
City. Hamel In (207. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
NEW York m ip 888-7 U 8 

SL Louts MS 188 M8— 1 7 8 

Sabertioaen t»d Hundtev; Ottvare* Rodft- 
ooez (57. Ev er seerd (47. Buckets 191 end Pay 
noed. W — ■Saberhanwv 194. L— Olivares. 2-3. 

8*8 781 888 — 2 4 1 

SU 889 ST*— 4 M 8 

Banks, Otto W. Veres (4), Crtm (7) end 
Parent; Neaofat, Mkxll. (I) end Parrish. 
w H e apte. »dL— Banks. *9. Sv mieetl (It. 
HRs Chicago. Zambrano <4L P ittsburgh . 
(It. 

8B1 an 8M-4 7 1 

Florida M 0U BCB-l 9 1 

SdilMng, Andsnon (4). Sloaenb (77, Bor- 
land (?) and Pratt; Weathers, Mathews (7], 
Mutts (B, Lewis (8], Perez (9) and Sanlkigo. 
W— Scftfinno. 1-7. L— Weathers, W. 
Meefreal 888 W 380-6 11 I 

Atlanta OB 818 888— t .4 8 

PMartmet Roks IT), wwietand (97 end 
Flehber, spear 171; Smoltz. Wohlers (7), 
Station 0i, BMscfcJ (97 and O'Brien. Lope s 
(77. W— PMorthie*, H. L W ohlers. 7-i 
s v- w e t t zkMd rm iiTti nw n iiii* rsm— 
(151. Atlanta Klesko (17). Pendleton (4). 

08 BBS 888—4 S 1 
204 m It*— 7 M 1 
Swtndett. wadam* (3). Edens (7), Hampton 
(9>. Vsres (9) and Eusebio; Smliev, Carrasco 
(7) ceid DonetLW— Smiley, 11-*. L— Swindell, 
7-7. Sv— Carrasco (47. HRe-OMfnrati, 
MUdietl 2 Ot). 

CB I w ads tm 808 119—4 9 1 

San Diego « 880 SOI— 3 M 1 

RHz. Harris (7).Munaz (7), Reed (8), Ruffin 
(81 ant Sbeaffer. Ow en s (8): Penes Mauser 
(11. Tatxsfco ID, FTarte (9) and Arams. 
W-RBZ.44. L — Beoes. 6-12. Se-Hirtfln 04)- 
HRs— ColonxbGalarnniaQD.Sheatter (1). 
San Dtoga. Johnson (3). 

«1 BBS 883—10 11 3 

8BB MS a to— a 7 1 



Partite League 

W L T 

Pet. 

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PITTSBURGH— Sorted diaries Joftnson. 
wide receiver, to 4-year contract Signed 
Brantson Buckner, defensive Nnemon. Re- 
tooled Mike Baker. wMe receiver. 




BASEBALL 


CLEVELAND— Optioned Jerry DlPoto, 
ptteher. to Charlotte. IL Called up AJUe Lo- 
pes, Pilcher, from Oiariotte. Extended Hie 
c e ntractol Mike HororavfcmiB ki oer. through 
1994 season. 


SAN FRANCISCO— wotved Karl Wilson, 
defensive end. Waived Jon Baker, detersive 
Hnemon,andAPttionyJe9fersoawMerecefw- 
er. Agreed to terms with Bryant Yaung^eten- 
stve tackle, an a 6-vear contract signed Ed 
MeCettrey. wide receiver. 

WASHINGTON — Stoned Martin Baylesw 
safety, to 1 wear c ontract, and Tre" Johnson 
offensive Hneraaa la 4-vear contract Waived 
Austin QtoMa. vride receiver, and Steve Do- 
mingos. punter. 


Court Gears Rugby Player in Killing 

LONDON (AP) — The first player in English rugby’s 171-year 
history to be prosecuted for a death on the field was found not 
guilty of manslaughter Tuesday. 

William Hardy. 25. an electrician, was cleared of charges that he 
“deliberately and unlawfully*’ caused the death of Seamus La veil e 
during a chib match between West Drayton and Hendon 16 
months ago. Prosecutors aDeged that Hardy had “deliberately and 
unlawfully” disabled Lavelle with an uppercut to the jaw during 
the match. As Lavelle fell backward, his bead struck the ground. 
He died from traumatic head injuries two days later. 

“It’s tragic. A man is still dead” said Hardy, who embraced 
relatives as be left the court “1 am relieved I have been cleared 
but I shall carrying on grieving for him. T am still upset someone 
has died” 

Celtics Drop Parish, Last of Big 3 

BOSTON (AP) — Robert Parish, 41. the last active member of 
one of the greatest front lines in National Basketball Association 
history, will not play next season for the Boston Celtics. 

That probability became a certainty when the team used Parish’s 
$2.8 million salary cap slot to sign the free agent Dominique Wilkins 
last Friday. League rules provide a one-year prohibition on teams 
re-signing a player whose slot it used to sign another player. 

For the first 12 of his 14 seasons with Boston, Parish teamed 
with the forwards Larry Bird and Kevin McHale to form a 
briDiam front line. Bird retired after the 1991-92 season and 
McHale retired a year later. 

For the Record 

Isabelle Brasseur and Lloyd ISsler of Canada, ice dance bronze 
medalists at the IJHehammer and Albertville Olympics, an- 
nounced in Toronto on Tuesday that they were quitting competi- 
tion to concentrate on a professional career. (AFP) 

Bobby Charlton, 56, the former English soccer star, was knighted 
by Queen Elizabeth D at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday. (AFP) 

The Denver Broncos and Los Angeles Raiders arrived in Barce- 
lona on Tuesday in preparation for the first American Bowl game 
of the National Football League preseason on Sunday. (AP) 


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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 1994 


OBSERVER 


A Classical Turnoff 


By Russel] Baker 

N EW YORK — California, 
which is in the vanguard of 
practically everything, has 
started using classical music as 
a teenager repellent. 

Apparently nothing works 
like a dose of Beethoven quartet 
for driving a horde of teenagers 
out of your neighborhood, un- 
less it’s a Bach fugue. All the 
masters are powerful juice, 
however: Haydn, Mozart. Wag- 
ner, Brahms .... The pity is 
they can't be sprayed out of a 

c?n 

Id California, severe infesta- 
tions of teenagers occur, as in 
the Hast, in malls and around 
convenience stores. Biologists 
believe teenagers are lured by 
the combination of generous 
parking space and chilled soda 
pop. 

□ 


have created, everybody would 
be better off if they couldn’t 
ever hear anything anyhow. 

□ 


These, say the scientists, 
combine in mild weather to in- 
tensify a terrifying teenager lust 
for noise. At one time this could 
be gratified by a small car radio, 
or so it was believed by early 
teenage rdogists- 

How wrong they were. Ap- 
parently the teenager has al- 
ways had an ear organ — ironic 
word for it in view of teenager 
detestation of Bach’s magnifi- 
cent organ music — which cre- 
ates an insatiable craving for 
decibels. 


What excites the teenagers to 
such sass? Scientists believe the 
fury results when a teenager 
hears what he regards as music 
referred to-as “noise." 

Experiments at the Institute 
of Teenager Sturm und Drang 
suggest that the teenager does, 
in Tact, believe that sound capa- 
ble of blowing out eardrums 
eight blocks from its source is, 
as one specimen teenager called 
it, “the sweetest music this side 
of Heaven." 

California malls, like most 
malls, provide incessant broad- 
cast music, which is theoretical- 
ly supposed to stimulate the 
money-spending juices of their 
prototypical customer, a well- 
heeled baby boomer who is go- 


ing on SO. 


o a teenager an^rock is bet- 


ter than no rock. So the malls 
have been providing a rock to 
stay the teenager’s hunger until 
he can get to a convenience 
store and turn up the sound to 
the point where it scares the 
hurricanes back to the horse lat- 
itudes. 

□ 


California malls now find 


they can clear them out fast by 
pis 


Only recently has electronic 
technology reached the stage 
where it can even begin to pro- 
vide the decibels the teenager 
can absorb without pain. 

Industrial-strength electronic 
weaponry now being sold can 
make life insupportable for 
neighbors of open-air business- 
es like convenience stores expe- 
riencing a teenager infestation. 

Malls can police teenager 
noise better than convenience 
stores, but they find that teen- 
agers nevertheless tend to scare 
older customers who associate 
them with noise capable of 
deafening the innocent for 
miles around. 

Teenagers say there aren’t 
any innocents for miles around 
anymore and, in view of the 
unspeakable world their elders 


replacing baby- boomer rock 
with the classics. Teenagers 
simply can’t stand it. 

Four notes of a Mozart piano 
concerto affect them the way 
DDT used to affect earwigs. 
Scientists believe teenagers di- 
stinctively fear that classical 
music is a deadly threat to their 


music is a deadly threat to their 
health, just as the boomer gen- 
eration believes cigarette smoke 


will do them all in. 

This could mean a grim future 
for people who are not already 
dear, because teenagers, who in- 
variably get older, are bound to 
be in charge eventually. We 
could end up a nation of malls 
vibrating to unbearable sounds 
and of social outcasts huddled in 
lonely alleys listening through 
ear plugs to heavily taxed tapes 
of Venn's “Requiem.” 

A few York Tima Service 


Latest Collecting Boom: 




By William Grimes 

New York Turn Service 

N EW YORK — America’s post- 
war boom brought with it an offi- 
cial style and an official narrative. The 
mood was optimistic. The cars, the 
kitchen appliances and even the peo- 
ple were shiny and bright 
After a depression and a world war, 
the vision of a split-level suburban 
house and a happy nuclear family 
took up permanent residence in the 
national brain. All endings were hap- 
py ones. Officially, there were no 
shadows. 

Well, forget all that 
With the persistence of a recurring 
nightmare, images of the other post- 
war America now stalk the land, offer- 
ing lurid testimony of an alternative 
nation — an America of cheese, tease 
and sleaze — of bondage princesses, 
third-rate dinosaur and outer-space 
movies, dark and violent tough-guy 
thrillers, scandal rags, “nudie-cutie” 
adult films, bodybuilders, hot rodders 
and juvenile delinquents. 

In an orgy of historical revisionism, 
collectors, amateur historians and the 
style-hungry have been working the 
margi ns of late-’40s and '50s America, 
timing over rocks and peering into 
forbidden corners with the savage glee 
of a gang of bikers holding Ozzie and 
Harriet hostage. 

There’s a lively market in drugstore 
pulp paperbacks, scandal magazines 
(especially if the cover shows trash 
goddesses like Mamie Van Doren or 
Jayne Mansfield), and pinup art 
Video distributors, having, worked 
their way through the B material, are 
frantically exhuming levels C and D, 
in some cases bringing out '50s films 
that never made it to the screen. Pub- 
lishers like Vintage have reissued a 
slew of tough-guy '50s crime writers 
like Jim Thompson and Charles Wihe- 



OtOBT MuhanmudJThD New York Tunc* 

Miriam Linna and Billy Miller repackage little-known rebel rockers. 


ford. Picking up the scent Showtime 
illy asked 


recently asked' a handful of well- 
known directors to remake 1950s B 
movies for a new series, “Rebel High- 
way.” 

“People think of the 20 years after 
the war as this Eisenhower, golf. 
“Leave It to Beaver,’ plastic sort of 
Timt!, but there was a real undercur- 
rent of sex, violence, mystery and ex- 
ploitation.” said Alan Betrock. an ar- 
chivist who publishes collectors’ 


guides to popular scandal and giriie 

ma gazines like 


Dare, 


Confidential, 

Glance and Naked Truth. 

The cover lines sizzled. “To Get 


Him Back I Had to Become ... A 
Cheap Pickup.” “Those Naughty, 
Naughty Stories About Diana Dors.” 
“Have You Tasted Forbidden Love?” 
“Hollywood Dope Racket.” The mag- 
azines offered everything that televi- 
sion didn’t. 

“These magazines sold 35 million 
copies a month,” Betrock said. “Con- 
fidential was the largest-selling news- 
stand magazine in America. This 
wasn’t a small thing; it was a big 
thing.” 

It’s still a big thing. James Ellrqy 
has mined a rich vein of sleaze in 
books like “The Big Nowhere," “LA. 
Confidential” and “Hollywood Noc- 
turne,” double-hard-boiled crime sto- 
ries that make Los Angeles in the early 
’50s seem like a bubbling cesspool. 

Everyone is crooked, the double- 
cross is the usual form of human inter- 
action, the cops are barely distinguish- 
able from the creeps they bust. The 
prose is nonstop uppercuts. 

Eliroy, whose next novel, “Ameri- 
can Tabloid,” will be a 
Knopf in the fall takes a _ 
pleasure in minglin g with his kind of 


people, whom he describes, with plea- 
sure, as “the peepers and prowlers, 
homosexual informers and hepcat 
junkies, voyeuristic cops and dope ad- 
dicts.” 


Those were the days. 

In fact, Eliroy sees a kind of inno- 
cence behind the world he describes. 
“Back then, square Americans knew 
the dark stuff was out there, but it was 
contained,” he said. “It didn’t have a 
name; it wasn’t thrashed out on televi- 
sion tikeit is today. People want to go 
bade into an era when there were 
shadows.” 

There are many roads back into the 
murk. Through their Norton record 

. tahrf, Miriam i Inna and her 

Billy Miller, repackage little-known 
rebel rockers and ultrafrantic rocka- 
billy ringers like HasD Adkins and 
Johnny Powers, the ultimate in teen 
alienation. 

Their series “The Raging Teens,” 
now at three volumes, offers a scenting 
impossibility: New England rockabil- 
ly- 

“You wouldn't think you'd get one 


vdume_of that,” Miller said, “but we 
.may put oat Volume 4.” (Volumes 2 
throbgti 3 mdude promising angry- 
teen titles like “Gangwar,” “Gimme 
the Keys" send ' “Renegade:") 

Pride -of place in the Norton cat* 
lognegoes to Link Wray, master of the 
scary, rwerfHrich guitar solo. 

“I tike the Hell’s Angels instrumen- 
tal kind, of stuff, when he was a real 
maniac,” said liana, who panted ont 
that Wray's. 1958 hit "Rumble” vras 
the only instrumental ever to be 
banned as a possible incitement to 
gang, warfare,. 

. At Kim’s Video in the East Village, 
a sign near the door promises “honor, 
sci-n, mifldtes * action and gratuitous 
violence" by the best of the nation’s 
driw-m auteurs." ■ •; • 

This includes - special sections for 
biker fihns, juvenw-ddinqueat films, 
exploitation fi l ms and, of course, the 
complete works of Ed Wood. Jr., the 
legendary director erf “Plan 9 From 
Outer Space,” “Jail Bah," “Bride of 
the Monster” and other triumphs of 
cinematic incompetence. 

Wood has become a figure of fasci- 
nation. for revisionists. A cross-dress- 
er, he played a thinly disguised version 
of himself in the very strange “Glen or 
Glenda,” a film that was made in 1953 
but not released until 1981. “The 
world still wasn’t ready ” Michael 
Weldon justly noted-in his seminal 
le, “The Psycfaotronic Encyclope- 
- of Him.” ' 

But the wheel of history has turned.. 
Today Wood stands- as a towering, 
anti-auteur, technically awful but 
mysteriously compelling- (Tim Bur- 
ton, the director of the Batman films, 

is making a feature film on his life and 

work.) And along with, him, a host of 


en trom the depths. 

Video companies like Sinister Cine- 
ma in Medford, Oregon, and. Soane- 


every one of them; from horror, i 
juvenile delinquent and exploitation 
to such intriguing hybrids as sword- 
and-sandal meets sci-fi (“Hercules 
Against the Moon Men”) usd horror 
westerns (“Billy the Kid Meets Dnt- 
cula"). 

“This was the r fun stuff that dida’i. 
nuke any apologies,” said - Michael 
Batson, the editor of the forthcoming 
“1 Mamed a Monster From Outer 
Space: Tear-and-Send Postcards 
From the Truly TteniWe Fantasy and 
Science Fiction B- Movies of the *40s 
and *5Qs” (Pantheon). 


people 



SoF«ff-,iVofSoG<»d 

Paul McCartney and his 
neighbor, the television vntafc. 
SI Lane, failed in then bid to 
save 150 Canada geese that 
were proving a nmssuwemUa.- 
doa’s^ Battersea paric.-McCart- 
nS’ suggested they be moved to 
to Sussex estate. Yoo fate. 
Marksmen from the local coun- 
cil shot them. Meanwhile. 
McCartney, outraged that Gil- 
lette uses animals in product 
testing, has sent his razor, shav- 
ing cream anti 

back to the company. McCart- 
ney demanded a refund, which 
he said he would donate to Peo- 
ple for the Ethical Treatment of 
Animals. 

□ 

Madonna is seeking a re- 
straining order against Todd 
Midtutei Lawrence, accusing 
him of stalking her and calling 
himself her husband. She says 
he has been ringing the buzzer 
at her Hollywood house and 
saying he was “coming home.'* 

■ according to court papers filed 
in Los Angeles. 

□ 


Bryce Taylor, a New Zea- 
lander bring sued by Princess 
Diana for photographing her 
working out in a London gym, 
says Bu ckingham Palace has 
singled him out because he's 
not British, and is using him to 
send a message to the British 
media. 

Q - - 

The movie producer David 
Geffm thinks writers should 
stick to writing and leave the 
casting to him. Anne Rke, au- 
thor of “Interview. With the 
Vampire,” complained when 
Tom Oise was chosen byGef- 
fen’s company to play the vam- 
pire Lest&l in the film of die 
book. “People were outraged 
when Vivien Leigh was cast is 
the role of Scarlett O'Hara,” he 
said. “Today, it is unthinkable 
that anybody- else could have 
played it” 


INTERNATIONAL 
CLASSIFIED - 

. Appears ott ftifir H 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



High 

Low 

W 

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Low 

W 


OF 

CZF 


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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu- Weather. Asia 



Jwwrawn 


Homy 
5no« 


North America 

Unseasonably hot weather 
will cover tfte Western states 
through the and ol the week. 
Frequent showers wfl eecur 
across the western Great 
Lakes There w* be showera 


end thunderstorm* Thursday 


and Friday across much 
the East, including New York 
and Washington. D C. 


Europe 

Much ol Central and Eastern 
Europe will remain unsea- 
sonably hot through the end 
of the week, Indualra Berfn, 
Warsaw and Minsk. Showers 
will cover much at Britain 
and Ireland. Paris to Munich 
wfl be 3lkjhtly warmer then 
usual with a few thunder- 
storms. 


Asia 

Frequent reins wfli continue 
Into fire weekend across 
southern China, including 
Hong Kong. This win aggra- 


vate the current Hooding 


The wet pen am win persist 
the northern PhUppmes with 
heavy showers and thunder- 
storms each day. Much of 
Japan and Korea wti be hot 


Asia 


Today 




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13 Renders 
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14 Logical thinker 

15 Praises: Var. 
is Lovable 


is Assam 
is River Inlet 
a© Swiss river 

32 Sequel to 
Buck's “The 
Good Earth" 

33 Group of gangs 
ze Sank dams 

as Geo. andThos., 
. e.g. 
as Adjusts 
31 Belles — — 


33 "Are Amanda" 
author 

as Word repealed 
in a Doris Day 
song 

3* Brownies 

33 Meal 

4« Balkans map 
abbr. 

44 Some boxing 


Solution to Pnrie of July 26 


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ej Boar or boor 


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strongman 
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or believer 


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24 Mr. Sikorsky 
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30 Located 
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Lucrece' 

34 Pays pert of 

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locale 
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31 The slammer 
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41 Dismiss lightly, 
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"fravd in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AKKar Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1 . Using the chan below, find the country you are calling from. 

2 Dial the corresponding ACS' Access Number. 

3. An ADS' EoglislMpeaking Operator or voice prom{xvviU ask for the phooe number ycHiivish to caQ or connect you io a 

mstocaa service representative. 

To receive your free waflet card bfXBfffc Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 
tbeoountjry yotfresaandask fOTCXtaantTServioe. 


* 



Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 am knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with ABEC 1 

To use these services, dial the AISST Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
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If you don’t have an AIi£T Calling Card or you’d like more information on ABET global services, just call us using the 


convenient Access Numbers on your right. 



COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Ilaly" 

172-1011 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

TJwhwwurtn* 

15*00-11 

China, FKC*** 

10811 

1 MiimwIm 

8*196 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

0-8004)111 

Hong gong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.yjt. of 99900AO8S 

India* 

000-117 

Mata* 

0800-890-110 

hnkinulii 

WrtBOl^LO 

Monaco" 

194.-0011 

Japan" 

0039-111 

Netherlands" 

06-022-9111 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Korea** 

- il* 

Poland'* “ 

0*0 10-480-011 1 

Midaysla* 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

050171-288. 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Vamawla 

01-8004288 

rxzmppmor 

109-11 

RnsstorOtosoow^ 

155-5042 

Saipan* 

235*2872 

Son&k 

004204)0101 

Singapore 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

P00-9P-0O-11 

SrtLanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

020-795-611 

Tehran* 

0080-102884) 

Swbzeriand" 

1554)0-11 

TteiJand* 

C01W91-1U1 

UK- : 

050089-0011 

EUROPE 

Ufasdne*’ 

8*300-11 

Anaenkr 

8*14111 

MIDDLE EAST 

Austria**** 

022-90^011 

Bahrain - • 

8004)01 

Mgk'in* 

0600-100-10 

Cypms* 

. oao^oow 

Bulgaria 

00-1900-0010 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Croatia** 

99-3M011 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Czech Kep 

0042000101 

LdbaaoaOMnxt) 

426-801 

Oetuank* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

.08004)11-77 

Wnfemri 1 

9800-100-10 

Sautfi Arabia 

1-800-10 

France 

19*4)011 

Taster 

00-800-12277 

Gemmay 

01304010 

UAE" 

- axMzi 

Greece" 

00-800-1S1L 

AMERICAS ~ 

Hnogary* 

00*-6004)1111 

Argemirta* 

001-800-200-HH 

Icdancfa 

9994X31 

Bribe* 

555 

— . J* 

1-80MSWW. 

.Bolivia" 

o-eoo -1115 


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COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Brazil 

0004010- 

Cl ,71- 

00*4)312 

Ctdttndbda 

980-11-0010 

Costa Rica's 

114 

Ecuador* 

. ... no 

ElSaivadorti 

• J90. 

Guatemala" 

190 

Guyana"** 

165 

Honduras** 

223 

Mexico*** 

-95-80CH6Z-1240 

pac * r ^ua (Managua') 174 

Panama* 

100 

Peru* 

191 

Suriname 

156 

Venezuela** 

000*10 

804)11-220 

CARIBBEAN 

Bahamas 

1-800-872-2881 

Bermuda* 

HSXP872-2881 

British VI 

T-80WT2-2a8i 

cxytnanlstaids 

l-3QM72-»« ' 

Grenada* 

1-800-R72-2881- 

Haiti* 

001-800.972-2883 

Jamaicar 

0-800^*2-2881 

NedLAxMfl 

001-800-872^2881 

St- KltCL ^evts . 

HSXW2-2881 

AFRICA 


5304)200 

Gabon"- 

Gambia* 

(MU-001 

Kenya* ~ 

0800-10 

Ilbcrla 

797-797 

sown Africa 

0*00494125 


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